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R1100s models, repair information and related

I put the shorter link on the rear, which raised the rear ride height a bit and steepened the front end quite helpful in addressing slow steering. Not sure if you've looked at that. There was a factory sport suspension kit, but some folks just used a GS rear arm.

If you're still messing around with suspension settings. I added Ohlins and oh my. It finally made that bike ride and handle like it was capable of.
 
Yeah, at the beginning of ownership I replaced all the suspension, still emulsion shocks but much better than stock quality (YSS). My rear shock does have ride height adjust, so I could shorten the arm, nice to know the GS hack. Forks are slide up and inch or so the accommodate clip-ons above the top clamp, but still steers like a truck.
Question: if you jack the rear with a shorter arm, does that screw up our kickstand? Or does that just lean over more than stock, which I think would be an improvement anyway.
 
I didn't have any issues with the sidestand. BMW says you can't put the centerstand on it, but I never had any issues.

I spent some time setting up static sag front and rear, which made a pretty huge difference in turn in, as well. I think telelever bikes are pretty sensitive to rear ride height, especially. If I forget to raise the rear of my RT when my wife is with me, it steers like a truck and just resists turning in pretty hard. Add two turns of preload and everything's just fiiiiiine and we're out carving corners and having fun.

I never rode my S two up often, but if I forget to raise the rear preload when I had all my gear piled on there, I knew it almost immediately.
 
I just swapped the front tire out a couple months ago on the 99 1100RT. Road 4's. The old one was pretty triangular in the cross section from lots of cornering on tight roads. The amount of countersteering needed especially at slow speeds was incredible. Bike just wanted to fall over. New tire and it was all gone. The bike is really sensitive to the psi and the front tire in general. Overall, I find it takes more practice and concentration to ride the 1100RT well at very slow speeds than say the 1200RT.
 
I have been looking for a more "triangular profile" front so it would fall in easier. Coming from a roadrace background, static sag (racetech method) was the first thing I did with the new shocks. I have a sneaking suspicion that the lower center mass of a boxer design may actually fight quick transitions that a bike with a higher center of mass would fall over quicker. I also think it's unfair for me to expect a 20+ year old twin designed for sport touring will handle like a race prepped GSXR literbike that I'm used to.
 
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Mini hater.
While on the Tail of the Dragon, I noticed Christine really hates Minis. She would dog them and keep pushing them into corners in hopes of a forced error.
She's not buying that they are true BMW's...:) You can't reason with her.
 
Just installed AF-XIED, (gen4) set on #7. Put a 100 miles on it and see stronger throttle response and a "howl" from the engine I've never heard during wide open. Hope the off throttle and slow speed stuff gets better. This was the wire-it yourself version. Not too hard. O2 sensor had 31k on it so left that alone.
It does start and idle better.
 
Just installed AF-XIED, (gen4) set on #7. Put a 100 miles on it and see stronger throttle response and a "howl" from the engine I've never heard during wide open. Hope the off throttle and slow speed stuff gets better. This was the wire-it yourself version. Not too hard. O2 sensor had 31k on it so left that alone.
It does start and idle better.
Your race-bred expertise and mods are very intriguing... but I feel like every time I start going deep into the mods on a bike or car I end up someplace where I'm challenged to get the package right and wish I'd just left well enough alone. My only material mods beyond the Sargent seat [ultimate non Ohlins mod] is a Danmoto cat elim that came installed, along with a peg/controls lowering kit [also installed by the previous owner].

All that said as I roll up toward 40k miles suspension refresh/upgrade is very intriguing and all the talk of the sensor mods etc. is compelling. Shoulda bought the exhaust I had a line on last year but $1k seemed a bit steep! Anyhoo, interested in your continued R&D, thanks for sharing.
 
A racing background is more of a curse than a blessing on the street. On track every race bike was crafted just for your racing style and body dimensions, it spoiled you for sure. Some mods can easily go down the rabbit hole, like suspension/dampening settings. Fueling as well. For both, I make a tweak and ride it sometimes for months until I know it needs another click or setting. But I love the chase to perfection, knowing I'll never get quite there, but want to see how close I can get.

Totally get others may just ride the damn bike, never care that their front tire is really 1psi too low for their particular riding style or less compression on their front suspension will help sluggish turn in...it's a curse.
 
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