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Pro's and Con's of 2024 Redmond Rally

Thanks for the correction! My sticker shock was such that I couldn’t remember the correct price!😳

Best,
DeVern
When I first (and last) ordered on Tuesday afternoon arrival they had just finished setting up in the beer garden.
Cans all lined up for selection ease, no prices posted. Asked for two Coors.
Sixteen Dollars she stated.
Me: … no I don’t want a 12 pack, just two.
Her: regulated event pricing is $8 each.
Me: I was hoping to be here often, but you won’t see me again. Regulated common sense of pricing.
 
It may help those concerned with the “event” pricing of “beer” at an event location is to attend a sporting event and experience that this pricing is common.
While many may be bothered by this pricing, the only real way around this is for the MOA to some way, in the background, subsidies the beer vendors……..and that will increase “Gate” pricing, even if you don’t want beer.
A quick search- or visit, asking the beer pricing at a sporting event or trade show will amaze those that haven’t been to an event in a while.
It’s not the MOA’s fault either for location selection or lack of negotiation, it’s “overhead”.
OM
 
It may help those concerned with the “event” pricing of “beer” at an event location is to attend a sporting event and experience that this pricing is common.
While many may be bothered by this pricing, the only real way around this is for the MOA to some way, in the background, subsidies the beer vendors……..and that will increase “Gate” pricing, even if you don’t want beer.
A quick search- or visit, asking the beer pricing at a sporting event or trade show will amaze those that haven’t been to an event in a while.
It’s not the MOA’s fault either for location selection or lack of negotiation, it’s “overhead”.
OM
Our Club selecting a venue/location for its membership annual gathering…
is not a “for profit” sporting event.
We can do better. Or we fail to exist in the future. Shitty shower trailers & expensive beer will be the death of our previous success at rally’s.
This has to stop.
 
It may help those concerned with the “event” pricing of “beer” at an event location is to attend a sporting event and experience that this pricing is common.
While many may be bothered by this pricing, the only real way around this is for the MOA to some way, in the background, subsidies the beer vendors……..and that will increase “Gate” pricing, even if you don’t want beer.
A quick search- or visit, asking the beer pricing at a sporting event or trade show will amaze those that haven’t been to an event in a while.
It’s not the MOA’s fault either for location selection or lack of negotiation, it’s “overhead”.
OM
Exactly. The beer is going to cost more because of their extra overhead costs. Inventory, transportation, refrigeration, and servers all cost more than if you went into your local liquor store and grabbed a six pack.

Up until about 10 years ago, for many years my part time side job was as an alcohol compliance supervisor for stadiums, arenas, and other venues in my area. A VP of the food and drink vendor (I won’t mention their name but they’re the largest in North America and they service stadiums, arenas, universities, and yes, prisons) shared with me that they were Budweiser’s largest customer, and they paid appropriately 50 CENTS for that can of beer that they charged $8 for. (at that time, it’s probably $12 now)
 
Nothing is inexpensive anymore but getting ripped off at about every turn leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
I am quite picky as to what rallies I go to and personally I prefer the smaller ones but YMMV
 
While I have done my share of shopping at BMW MOA National Rallies to me the rallies are not about stuff. They are about the ride to get there and about seeing again the many friends we have met over the past 40 years at these rallies.
 
I’m not familiar with event sites providing wifi as that means each group needs to password in- which can be automatically done. Having wide open wifi is something that site owners may have but a quick join-up has been historically not secure for those that join- think the free wifi at McDonald’s restaurants.
I am more familiar with a site providing a dedicated cell infrastructure to accommodate the groups that attend these event sites- think cell service at a concert event. The dedicated cell sites are usually built robust enough to support a lot of streaming. :dunno
OM
Get ya some VPN and you can use public sites with some level of security, password or not.
 
No waiting at 4:30am
We adhere to "rally shower schedule" which means afternoon. You slept in a tent. Nobody cares what you smell like when you just crawled out of a tent.

We'd get up, go for a ride and then have a nice quiet shower in the PM before dinner.
 
When I first (and last) ordered on Tuesday afternoon arrival they had just finished setting up in the beer garden.
Cans all lined up for selection ease, no prices posted. Asked for two Coors.
Sixteen Dollars she stated.
Me: … no I don’t want a 12 pack, just two.
Her: regulated event pricing is $8 each.
Me: I was hoping to be here often, but you won’t see me again. Regulated common sense of pricing.
You can always bring your own, you know. We used to carry a soft cooler for exactly that reason.
 
You can always bring your own, you know. We used to carry a soft cooler for exactly that reason.
Yep. I live in Washington. We look upon Oregon as the state of cheap liquor and beer. There was a great liquor store on the way to the Safeway and every brewery will gladly sell you as many growlers as you can carry.
 
Get ya some VPN and you can use public sites with some level of security, password or not.
That comment doesn’t seem to jive with the following comment-
I also missed the booklet as the app seemed limited with our demands on the bandwidth. And some older than me were digitally impaired. But being from Vermont i found the night temperature perfect. And there were enough vendors to lighten my billfold a bit
A primer on things associated with a VPN (virtual private network) would be another whole deal.
OM
 
That comment doesn’t seem to jive with the following comment-

A primer on things associated with a VPN (virtual private network) would be another whole deal.
OM

I think wifi isn't necessary like it used to be a few years back. Who buys a phone that doesn't have LTE or 5G data access anymore?

VPN isn't hard like it used to be. Now it's just an app and a service you buy to protect your data and you. Unlike corporate VPNs, which required tons of configuration and the like, these are crazy simple to use. You seriously just push the button.
Yep. I live in Washington. We look upon Oregon as the state of cheap liquor and beer. There was a great liquor store on the way to the Safeway and every brewery will gladly sell you as many growlers as you can carry.
Everybody knows that it costs more to drink in a bar than on your couch. :beer
 
Thats the primary reason I did not attend. Thats been the trend in the last few rallies. And if it doesn't change, I probably won't attend another national rally. But thats just me.

Joe
I am not bashing your opinion at all, however, it was one of my reasons to attend. I wanted to put a face with the company I may do business with. And I saw a lot of faces!
 
While I have done my share of shopping at BMW MOA National Rallies to me the rallies are not about stuff. They are about the ride to get there and about seeing again the many friends we have met over the past 40 years at these rallies.
You are correct. I have now been to 2 national rallies. I want the relationships more than the money. I am not being flippant, I loved the ride and want the friends. Have been blue collar all of my working life. Would enjoy meeting you Mr PGlaves.
 
You are correct. I have now been to 2 national rallies. I want the relationships more than the money. I am not being flippant, I loved the ride and want the friends. Have been blue collar all of my working life. Would enjoy meeting you Mr PGlaves.
Come to Lebanon next year. I have been to 37 of the past 40 rallies. I presented or participated with others in technical seminars called Very Basic Tech, Not So Basic Tech, Oilhead Tech, and other titles for more than 20 of those 40 years. We have literally met thousands of folks, many of which remain first name friends. That is what rallies are about. Not vendors. Not beer prices. Not other things. People! That is what rallies are about.
I will add this. Since my first rally in 1984 I have heard comments about how the rallies seem cliquish. Folks with their friends ignoring other folks. I have always tried to avoid this, even though it seems true. I have never sought out the "club camping" areas at the rallies. I would rather go camp with new folks and get to know them too. But this might be a double edged sword. New riders or new rally goer might do well to seek out the local club closest to their homes and go camp and get acquainted with them. Then back home more local activities become attractive among those new friends.
 
Come to Lebanon next year. I have been to 37 of the past 40 rallies. I presented or participated with others in technical seminars called Very Basic Tech, Not So Basic Tech, Oilhead Tech, and other titles for more than 20 of those 40 years. We have literally met thousands of folks, many of which remain first name friends. That is what rallies are about. Not vendors. Not beer prices. Not other things. People! That is what rallies are about.
I will add this. Since my first rally in 1984 I have heard comments about how the rallies seem cliquish. Folks with their friends ignoring other folks. I have always tried to avoid this, even though it seems true. I have never sought out the "club camping" areas at the rallies. I would rather go camp with new folks and get to know them too. But this might be a double edged sword. New riders or new rally goer might do well to seek out the local club closest to their homes and go camp and get acquainted with them. Then back home more local activities become attractive among those new friends.
At the next event or gathering, when someone is just kinda milling around by themselves, say Hello and try to include them.
Random inclusion, help with a problem, or even a compliment can frequently make a couple of peoples days.
OM
 
At the next event or gathering, when someone is just kinda milling around by themselves, say Hello and try to include them.
Random inclusion, help with a problem, or even a compliment can frequently make a couple of peoples days.
OM
And that is exactly what happened to me at my first National Rally in 2006 in Vermont Rally. A couple of experienced rally attendees seemed to frequently find me and engage me in conversations. 👍

The rest is history with my attendance at quite a few Nationals and even chairing a rally committee for a few years.
 
I just got back to South Carolina from the Rally and here are some of my Pros and Cons.

The Pros:
1. It was a great excuse to ride across the country and hit a bunch of southwestern "bucket list" spots; Taos/Angel Fire area, Route 66, Death Valley (at 114 degrees), Yosemite, Sonora Pass, Crater Lake, Bonneville Salt Flats, Colorado National Monument, Mount Blue Sky (formerly Mt. Evans and still the highest paved road in the USA) and other less known but amazing and beautiful spots along the road.
2. Peach Street Revival, the band that played after the door prize drawing, had some really strong talent and high energy. The wind was cold and the crowd was small, but those who stayed for the concert had a good one.
3. Check in was quick and easy.
4. The food trucks were plentiful and although a bit pricy were not out of line with other events that I have attended.
5. Good access to laundromats, restaurants, and grocery stores for those that wanted reasonably priced beer or did not want the food truck offerings.
6. The TRIUMPH demo truck. I may have found my next bike.
7. A good selection of tire vendors and installers.

The Cons:
1. The App. In the future, please use printed material first and the electronic format as a backup option.
2. Lack of vendors selling Motorcycle Related Items. I looked for a couple of dealers that were at other rallies but they were not there. Maybe they know something?
3. The Missing BMW Demo Truck. At least TRIUMPH was there.
4. Ridiculous beer prices.
5. The Shower Trailers. In my view a 5 out of 10; could be better, could be worse. At least the water was hot.
6. It may be just me, but it seems that the Cliques are becoming more "cliquish" . I located a fine flat spot to set up my tent, not very close to the tents already there, and as I was in the tent setting up my sleeping arrangements I heard some bikes pull in around my tent. One loud voice cussed the B*****d who set up near their spot. I did say Hello after I exited my tent, but they only seemed inclined to converse amongst themselves. So much for Club civility. I did meet and talk with a number of other riders during the rally though.
7. Again, The App. Many folks are not yet married to their device and prefer a simpler, low electronic lifestyle. For these members access to the seminars and other amenities are hampered by the lack of physically posted information.

This is just a quick view of one member's pros and cons and may well not reflect the views of most of the members experiences. We are each individuals with our own views, yet part of this collective we call the BMWMOA.
 
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