Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Trailering 2014 k1600gtl and tie down points

  1. #1

    Trailering 2014 k1600gtl and tie down points

    I would appreciate someone telling me, or better yet, showing me in photos, what the best way is to tie down and trailer my 2014 K1600GTL. I've got lay down bars front and rear but have learned that pulling down on the suspension is not good. Also have read that handlebar attachment is not good and I don't see a good place to tie onto the lower forks. So I could continue this list of what not to do, can someone tell me the best way? Thanks

  2. #2
    Straight from the owners manual
    Trailering.jpg

  3. #3
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    16,715
    Along with that information, Im a fan of leaving the bike in gear while its being transported.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  4. #4

    Trailering 2014 k1600gtl and tie down points

    Quote Originally Posted by rhbike View Post
    Straight from the owners manual
    Trailering.jpg
    Thanks for the info and pictures. My 2014 Rider's Manual doesn't even have a Sec 7, Page 130. Thanks again, nonetheless.

  5. #5
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    1,842
    You can get manuals in PDF form from BMW here: https://manuals.bmw-motorrad.com/en/rider-manual
    The manuals change from year to year, and the downloaded versions are sometimes updated, so the page numbers change also.

    Usually tiedown info is under Riding, look for something like "Fastening motorcycle for transport". That topic was in section 5, page 84 in the version I found.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  6. #6
    slave to gravity skibum69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    New Melbourne, NL
    Posts
    3,651
    I gotta say looking at it I don't like the low tie down points on the forks but that's just me.
    http://beerthief.ca
    ITSteve: ride in peace my friend
    save $5 on a new SmugMug account, use this coupon 7frrnSRiTt9Fk

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    117
    I've been hauling BMW's for years with the method the manual calls for and it works just fine.

    I once had to have a K1200GT towed and it became a bit of an argument with the tow truck driver as to how to secure the bike. Said he'd been towing bikes for 20 years as he went for the handlebars. I told him to unload the bike and that I wasn't paying him. He then listened.

    Thought just occurred to me. Print out the manual section with the illustrations and keep it with the bike. Next time an argument ensues break it out saying this will hold up in court when suing for damage.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    Along with that information, I’m a fan of leaving the bike in gear while it’s being transported.
    OM
    Not me... why strain the drive train (poetic)? If the tie down is proper there won't be significant fore/aft movement and if it's not proper being in gear won't help.

    I don't use the side stand either... see that way too often with the HD crowd.

  9. #9
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    1,842
    Quote Originally Posted by GIARCG View Post
    Not me... why strain the drive train (poetic)? If the tie down is proper there won't be significant fore/aft movement and if it's not proper being in gear won't help.

    I don't use the side stand either... see that way too often with the HD crowd.
    Any strain on the drive train will be miniscule compared to the forces on it while riding. Leaving the bike in gear might help with controlling the bike during loading/unloading.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  10. #10
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    16,715
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    Any strain on the drive train will be miniscule compared to the forces on it while riding. Leaving the bike in gear might help with controlling the bike during loading/unloading.
    Absolutely

    I also use the bike in gear when unloading down the ramp. The clutch friction on the rear wheel augments the iffy brake control that that disappears as soon as the front wheel locks up and starts to slide on the ramp.

    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    Any strain on the drive train will be miniscule compared to the forces on it while riding. Leaving the bike in gear might help with controlling the bike during loading/unloading.
    Miniscule to designed loads.. obviously. Unnecessary... absolutely. The comment was leaving the bike in gear while being transported, that means going down the road. Maybe I misunderstood the reason why someone would do that, I assumed it was to act as a parking brake of some sort.

    Your comment about controlling the bike while loading/unloading makes no sense to me... the good news is it doesn't have to.

    I power my bikes up the ramp running, transport them in neutral and coast them down the ramp using the front brake. Not suggesting you or anyone else do it that way...
    Last edited by GIARCG; 05-02-2021 at 02:12 AM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by GIARCG View Post
    Miniscule to designed loads.. obviously. Unnecessary... absolutely. The comment was leaving the bike in gear while being transported, that means going down the road. Maybe I misunderstood the reason why someone would do that, I assumed it was to act as a parking brake of some sort.

    Your comment about controlling the bike while loading/unloading makes no sense to me... the good news is it doesn't have to.

    I power my bikes up the ramp running, transport them in neutral and coast them down the ramp using the front brake. Not suggesting you or anyone else do it that way...
    A lot of these techniques depend on how steep the ramp is, how wide the ramp is, how big the bike is, and how little or big the rider may be. Unlike oil and tires, there might be more than one way.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    A lot of these techniques depend on how steep the ramp is, how wide the ramp is, how big the bike is, and how little or big the rider may be. Unlike oil and tires, there might be more than one way.
    Not sure what point you're attempting to make (oil and tires?) by stating the obvious. No one is claiming there is only one way to trailer a bike. Someone mentioned his method, I mentioned mine and questions were raised... that's what forums are for. I also stated clearly "Not suggesting you or anyone else do it that way..."

    I don't see any value in your post... mentioning only because you quoted me.

  14. #14
    A zip tie around the front brake lever also helps.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    16,715
    Quote Originally Posted by kirnal View Post
    A zip tie around the front brake lever also helps.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
    Welcome to the forum!

    From what I read, those that have had their bikes on a ferry really recommend this tip

    Im usually into a wheel chock and once in, I tie the wheel to the chock.

    Gary
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

Similar Threads

  1. Bluetooth Pairing Issues with 2014 Schuberth C3 Pro, NAV V, and 2018 K1600GTL
    By landcruiser15 in forum Straight 6 K1600 GT/GTL/B
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-11-2019, 02:39 AM
  2. 2014 K1600GTL, Bluetooth , audion success!
    By billblecher in forum Straight 6 K1600 GT/GTL/B
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-07-2016, 01:41 PM
  3. K1600GTL 2014 Passenger Wind Problem
    By Fineplumbing in forum Straight 6 K1600 GT/GTL/B
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-24-2015, 11:04 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •