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Thread: A little positive for BMW

  1. #16
    Nutfarm
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    They are great OLD bikes. But in some respects the sidestands, flexible frames, diode boards, rotors, brakes, receding valves, points, cracked coils, wheels, clutch splines, wheel splines and a few more notorious features do mean they are not perfect.
    Paul, you are quite correct about the old airheads. But the issues they have are far cheaper to deal with than the new ones. And I've never had one strand me because of a leaky fuel pump.

  2. #17
    Registered User STEVENRANKIN's Avatar
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    Good idea

    Ingenuity is the mother of invention. I used to be the guy who had to say "no" to garage expansion/construction. But then I rewrote the ordinance - and got it passed - to be more reasonable and make it somewhat easier for folks to meet their garage needs.

    A great idea except in my case, I am too well known and no one would vote for me in my village, NOT! LOL, St.

  3. #18
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    A former client of mine has an independent motorcycle repair facility, specializing in older Japanese machines.

    He told me some time ago: "the thing with BMW's is you can just keep recycling them..." He did think the transmission disassembly and assembly procedures were pretty onerous.
    Rinty

  4. #19
    Registered User STEVENRANKIN's Avatar
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    Or

    "the thing with BMW's is you can just keep recycling them

    Or, you can just keep rebuilding them so long as parts are available and keep on riding.

    I don't know if there exists as many independent parts manufacturers, or companies who have continued to make parts for Honda or other bikes to the degree BMW gets. I am amazed and thankful to those who continue to supply us with parts to keep our old bikes going. St.

  5. #20
    Registered User tanker4me's Avatar
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    I am presently caretaker to 3 Airheads. I'm familar with the laundry-list.
    Also a Kbike, two Bultacos, and a modern Yamaha.
    About ten years ago, while having lunch with a fellow rider I mentioned that a pair of R60/5 fuel petcocks set me back 80 bucks. I probably included that the BMW dealer down the street had them on the shelf.
    He stared at me a few seconds, then stated that he had spent 125 dollars for a single 70's Honda fuel petcock, and waited six weeks for it to be delivered.

    !5 years ago, before purchasing a R100GSPD after a 23 year hiatus from riding, I was looking for a Honda XR400 or TransAlp.
    After inquiring about parts availability at several Honda dealers, I decided to look for something else.

    Over a three month period, in two states 2000 miles apart, after the "can I help you" greeting, I would ask about the parts, all of the parts counter guys had the same response, the side to side "no" head shake without any words spoken. It was creepy, like they were robots.
    Bill

    ONE 130.jpg
    Last edited by tanker4me; 05-01-2021 at 01:28 AM.
    We are all here for a spell, get all the good laughs you can.
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  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by tanker4me View Post
    After inquiring about parts availability at several Honda dealers, I decided to look for something else.

    Bill
    In 1970 I had a connecting rod break in a Yamaha 250 scrambler. Then I spent a year at a remote radar site in Alaska. Upon my return I tried to get the parts to fix the bike. A few were available. Most were not. So I traded that bike in on a new RD250 in 1973 and got a trade-in price for the motor in boxes and the rolling chassis equal to what I paid for the bike. The dealer needed it for parts he couldn't get from Yamaha.

    This 50 year old example is just an anecdote. It hardly applies to 2021. But, I am willing to bet if I still had a 1973 Yamaha something, or Honda something, or Kawasaki whatever, if I sought a part like we might for a /5 BMW we would be laughed right out of the dealership. If I am wrong educate me.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 04-28-2021 at 02:33 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  7. #22
    Registered User tanker4me's Avatar
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    IMG_1344.jpg

    Did your scrambler look something like this? It's Big Bear 305 at a show in San Luis Obispo.
    We are all here for a spell, get all the good laughs you can.
    Will Rogers

  8. #23
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    [QUOTE=tanker4me;1247290]IMG_1344.jpg

    Did your scrambler look something like this? It's Big Bear 305 at a show in San Luis Obispo.[/QUOT
    Last edited by EUGENE; 04-28-2021 at 03:24 PM.

  9. #24
    Registered User STEVENRANKIN's Avatar
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    Availability

    While I frequently complain about the "modern" BMW's corporate nonsense, such as boutique dealerships with the "customer experience" as well as shops who turn their noses up at airheads, I do have to say, someone in BMW has done a good job keeping replacement parts in the pipes for us.

    In all honesty if I were not able to source parts for my two bikes, they would have been gone to the great scrap heap a long time ago.

    Also, I am VERY lucky that with proper maintenance the robust design of the time has allowed things such as the main engine bearings, crank, cam, transmissions, all the big expensive parts to last the miles they have. Oh yeah, I have had to have heads rebuilt, new jugs and pistons, brake master cylinders, shocks, and of course other wear components replaced. Given the way I rode/ride, these things wearing out come as no surprise.

    After buying my 84 R80RT new in early 85, I have just replaced most of the wiring harnesses. The originals finally starting to show their age and abuse from my riding in all kinds of weather including the salted roads of NY winters. In fact, the current overhaul of the bike now over this past winter was not so much as a mechanical overhaul, there were no mechanical issues to address, but a cosmetic one. Mind you, the bike has 240K miles on it.

    Inspection during this overhaul showed ALL major components to be in good shape, great compression, splines good. So, after wiring, paint, and some re chroming, I figure everything is good for another 100K miles. LOL, the chances of me doing that overhaul are slim to none.

    The highest mileage airhead I know of was ridden by my first dealer, and it was a R90S, now if he was to be believed, it had 500K miles on it and was still running the same major components. That and my bikes say a lot for proper while not always perfect design. St.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by STEVENRANKIN View Post
    While I frequently complain about the "modern" BMW's corporate nonsense, such as boutique dealerships with the "customer experience" as well as shops who turn their noses up at airheads, I do have to say, someone in BMW has done a good job keeping replacement parts in the pipes for us.

    In all honesty if I were not able to source parts for my two bikes, they would have been gone to the great scrap heap a long time ago.

    Also, I am VERY lucky that with proper maintenance the robust design of the time has allowed things such as the main engine bearings, crank, cam, transmissions, all the big expensive parts to last the miles they have. Oh yeah, I have had to have heads rebuilt, new jugs and pistons, brake master cylinders, shocks, and of course other wear components replaced. Given the way I rode/ride, these things wearing out come as no surprise.

    After buying my 84 R80RT new in early 85, I have just replaced most of the wiring harnesses. The originals finally starting to show their age and abuse from my riding in all kinds of weather including the salted roads of NY winters. In fact, the current overhaul of the bike now over this past winter was not so much as a mechanical overhaul, there were no mechanical issues to address, but a cosmetic one. Mind you, the bike has 240K miles on it.

    Inspection during this overhaul showed ALL major components to be in good shape, great compression, splines good. So, after wiring, paint, and some re chroming, I figure everything is good for another 100K miles. LOL, the chances of me doing that overhaul are slim to none.

    The highest mileage airhead I know of was ridden by my first dealer, and it was a R90S, now if he was to be believed, it had 500K miles on it and was still running the same major components. That and my bikes say a lot for proper while not always perfect design. St.

    I'm trying to think what I've had to replace on my '74 R90s (141k miles).

    cylinders re-bored at 110k with new pistons
    some seals
    a couple of pushrod tube seal replacements
    a tranny issue with the broken shifter pawl spring
    steering head bearings done at least 30 years ago
    wiring harness as the original started fraying and cracking

    I've never touched the crankshaft, cam, lifters, etc., which is impressive with an air cooled motor.

    Much to be said for BMW's keeping the spare parts available and the simple design that keeps these great old bikes on the road.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by EUGENE View Post
    That is a 1967 305 Big Bear twin. A 1973 250 would have been an single DT-1. Right Paul?
    The original bike was some model of late 60s vintage. I traded it in on a 1973 RD 250. I bought the first one when I saw it parked on the sidewalk with a for sale sign. I have no idea what model it was. It was black.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  12. #27
    Minnesota Nice! braddog's Avatar
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    A '73 RD250 is a little 2 stroke twin. The DT line were single enduro style bikes. I had a '74 DT250 growing up in NoDak, and I found a '72 RD250 a few years ago that I flipped (bought and sold, not wrecked).

    The parts availability for BMW's is amazing. The mere fact that so many of the airhead models are still on the road and still being ridden regularly is quite amazing. I have 2 of the original RS line, meaning I've got a '77 R100RS and a '94 R1100RS. I enjoy them both, but frankly enjoy the R100 more. It could use better brakes, for sure, and it seems like it always needs a little love somewhere, but it just goes.

    As an FYI, for those maybe wanting an old 2 stroke, there's a company called HVCycles out of Nebraska that pretty much has anything you'd need.
    -----------------------------------------
    Brad D. - Member #105766
    '77 R100RS - Black Beauty (big pipe, baby!)
    '94 R1100RS - Sylvia

  13. #28
    Registered User tanker4me's Avatar
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    Some have it worse than others.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rKH_ll8cFxY

    Bill
    We are all here for a spell, get all the good laughs you can.
    Will Rogers

  14. #29
    Registered User STEVENRANKIN's Avatar
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    Wow

    Boy now that was some collection of bikes. Sorry but it kind of mad me sad to watch it. A lot of bikes and I give a lot of credit to the guys who collect, or hoard them but, what happens when they pass on? Man it would be a real tragedy to have all or even some of the bikes end up in the scrap yard because the collector/hoarder, dies. Collectors, seem to have for the most part plans in place to make sure this doesn't happen but a lot of hoarders don't. They die and the remaining family/friends/agency, open the doors of the hoard, gasp and call the junk man. I am watching that happen now just a few miles from me, a crew has been working for a month or more with excavators and roll offs to clear a dead hoarder's hoard, There never was any kind of "sale" or what not to see if there was anything of value, nope, all the old cars, trucks and tractors are now junk. Hey, they may just well may be but it is still sad.


    So here is a cheer to the fellows who collect and hoard old bikes! A lot of them would have disappeared from history if it were not for you.

    And here is a plea to those same guys, make plans now while you are alive and in good mental health to dispose of your treasures because your kids, relatives, agencies, may not feel the same way you do and won't always do what is best. St.

  15. #30
    Watch This!!! junkjohn's Avatar
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    Us junk guys know witch junk to keep when doing a clean out.
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