Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 62

Thread: Ca DMV skills test

  1. #46
    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Trinity, NC
    Posts
    1,131
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I am curious. Does anybody know how riders of truly big big bikes, HD baggers, Goldwing, R18 etc. get licenses in California?
    Jerry (The Motorman) Paladino, has training classes, sells training videos, and has plenty of free video content too. He has all kinds of students in the videos but he features big V-Twins in the videos. They make it through the weaves and circles with those big bikes. It's the same coaching you hear everywhere; head & eyes (turned), clutch in the friction zone and some rear braking.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

  2. #47
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Corralitos, CA - Santa Cruz County
    Posts
    242
    I may go by the dmv here with my RT and see how bad I am at it. Easy to give advice when I haven't even done painted line or cone work since I did it with my F650.
    Signature

  3. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    Jerry (The Motorman) Paladino, has training classes, sells training videos, and has plenty of free video content too. He has all kinds of students in the videos but he features big V-Twins in the videos. They make it through the weaves and circles with those big bikes. It's the same coaching you hear everywhere; head & eyes (turned), clutch in the friction zone and some rear braking.
    I have seen the videos of LEOs training on their big motors, and have seen the competition events for motor officers. So I know that with hours and days and weeks and months of practice, years of experience, and lots of drops amazing things can be done with big heavy bikes. But that does not address how relatively new riders will perform.

    The cynic in me wonders what private contractor does the beginner schools in California and how they are connected to the state. If the state makes the on-bike skills test hard enough to pass but accepts the class instead they are inherently steering people to pay the contractor and take the class to avoid the hard to pass test. As in many things, follow the money.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  4. #49
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Tier of New York
    Posts
    2,206
    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    Jerry (The Motorman) Paladino, has training classes, sells training videos, and has plenty of free video content too. He has all kinds of students in the videos but he features big V-Twins in the videos. They make it through the weaves and circles with those big bikes. It's the same coaching you hear everywhere; head & eyes (turned), clutch in the friction zone and some rear braking.
    I doubt I would do all that well doing tight circles without a few practice sessions:



    Harry
    My fleet: 2015 R1200GS, 2017 Toyota Prius Prime (plug-in hybrid)

  5. #50
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    16,703
    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    Jerry (The Motorman) Paladino, has training classes, sells training videos, and has plenty of free video content too. He has all kinds of students in the videos but he features big V-Twins in the videos. They make it through the weaves and circles with those big bikes. It's the same coaching you hear everywhere; head & eyes (turned), clutch in the friction zone and some rear braking.
    I bought the instructional DVD...... I found it worthwhile
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  6. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I have seen the videos of LEOs training on their big motors, and have seen the competition events for motor officers. So I know that with hours and days and weeks and months of practice, years of experience, and lots of drops amazing things can be done with big heavy bikes. But that does not address how relatively new riders will perform.

    The cynic in me wonders what private contractor does the beginner schools in California and how they are connected to the state. If the state makes the on-bike skills test hard enough to pass but accepts the class instead they are inherently steering people to pay the contractor and take the class to avoid the hard to pass test. As in many things, follow the money.
    If CA's requirements are similar to that of other states, taking the skills test through the state licensed contractor (such as MSF for most states other than CA) is definitely not a way to get an easier or more lenient test. As a returning rider, I took the full on MSF beginner course last summer, and they taught to a significantly higher standard than what my state's skills test requires. Our state test is no easier than what you have described. Though probably not the case in most areas, but in our area, most taking the MSF beginner course were like me, coming to the table with a fair bit of prior motorbiking experience, which helped a lot. After 2 days spent doing mostly far tougher skills than what was required, they then tested us for every single item on the state required skills test. At that point, the test seemed easy peasy. For a true beginner, a 2 day course is not likely enough time to learn enough of the skills, and there's a good chance the student will still fail the skills test. Our class was sponsored through a Harley dealership, so we had to take the class with metric Harley's which rather heavy, poor handling Harley's - not the most ideal learner bike.

    I highly recommend taking the course, as a) you generally get to learn using a smaller/lighter/more agile bike (small Honda's are common), b) you don't have to fear putting their supplied bike down, and c) you learn the right way to do the skills. Once you have passed and got your license, you still need to practice on your bigger bike on your own.

  7. #52
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    441
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post

    The cynic in me wonders what private contractor does the beginner schools in California and how they are connected to the state. If the state makes the on-bike skills test hard enough to pass but accepts the class instead they are inherently steering people to pay the contractor and take the class to avoid the hard to pass test. As in many things, follow the money.
    Ok, now I have to tell my story. I started riding in North Carolina in 1971, no endorsement required. After a year in England, I moved to New York City in the late seventies and promptly purchased a motorcycle. NY required an endorsement so a buddy and I used a van to haul my bike to the testing site. The test then was to ride a prescribed route with the examiner observing from a trailing vehicle, which was the van driven by my friend. At the conclusion, my friend said that I was perfect with my signaling, stops, speed, etc. The examiner came over and dismissed my friend, then just stood there and waited. Finally, he said that I failed by not signaling, which I knew to be untrue. When I related my tale of woe to my boss, a life-long New Yorker, he just laughed and said that I was supposed to pay the examiner for an endorsement. He then called a friend who ran a motorcycle training school and set me up. I showed up, sat through a brief class, then rode an unfamiliar training bike around the block with the examiner following with my instructor. I don't know how much of my school fee went to the examiner (if any?), but I passed.

    Doug
    Sent from a Galaxy, far, far away

  8. #53
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    south of Los Angeles
    Posts
    3,014
    The California Motorcyclist Safety Program is administered by the California Highway Patrol, pursuant to California Vehicle Code section 2931, which established permanent funding for the program in 1994.

    They work hand-in-hand with the Total Control training programs to provide the places, bikes, and schedule.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls1150 View Post
    The California Motorcyclist Safety Program is administered by the California Highway Patrol, pursuant to California Vehicle Code section 2931, which established permanent funding for the program in 1994.
    Which explains the use of skills test elements practiced ad nauseum by motor officers.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  10. #55
    Registered User r0ckrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls1150 View Post
    The California Motorcyclist Safety Program is administered by the California Highway Patrol, pursuant to California Vehicle Code section 2931, which established permanent funding for the program in 1994.

    They work hand-in-hand with the Total Control training programs to provide the places, bikes, and schedule.
    And having taken MSF in WA to get my license, and an IRC class from a Total Control school, I can honestly say that you learn more in TC than MSF. (The IRC is one step up from the BRC - in BRC they include starting and stopping and shifting. In IRC they jump that part, and you are expected to already be able to do the cone weave and keyhole circle.)

  11. #56

    signed up

    Closest location to me is a JC that explains that the money goes to the college and the instructor. Their classes fill up quickly. I just grabbed one 2 months out. I will still do more slow speed work and try the skills test at the DMV in the interim. I can get a refund if I cancel 3 days prior to the class. No boring Zoom class or two days of long commute. I am going to ask the owner of the little all in one engine shop in the DMV town near me, (1/2 hr.) if he will rent me one of his bikes on the day of the DMV test. The closest BMW dealer is over an hour too. I still like living in the boonies. ChrisinSC let me know how you do on your DMV practice if you try on the big bike.

  12. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by mntngrown View Post
    My 1st post asked If anyone with an R1100S aced the Ca DMV skills test?. The guy I bought mine from said I should borrow a small displacement enduro etc. This R1100S does not , with my skill sets , want to do the DMV dog and pony show. After my post many people offered many suggestions but no one said yes I passed it on an R1100S no problem you incompetent bastage!. I practiced and practiced and when I swing by the DMV and just try to ride down the entry lines and do the circle I cannot with friction zone and counter weighting stay in that circle. I will take a class although having logged probably 50k miles on MC's I am beginning to feel that this test is not relevant to safe motor riding.

    Yes, I did the test on a R1100S. It’s capable of doing the DMV maneuvers with ease.
    What part of Ca are you in? Even if you’re far, if you’ve got good riding nearby, I could perhaps be persuaded to come up and teach you how. It would take just a few hours, max.

    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I am curious. Does anybody know how riders of truly big big bikes, HD baggers, Goldwing, R18 etc. get licenses in California?
    They either do the state approved course, or they take the test at the DMV. I’ve never encountered a bike incapable of navigating the DMV maneuvers.

    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I have seen the videos of LEOs training on their big motors, and have seen the competition events for motor officers. So I know that with hours and days and weeks and months of practice, years of experience, and lots of drops amazing things can be done with big heavy bikes. But that does not address how relatively new riders will perform.
    How to do the (fairly basic) maneuvers required by DMV, it should only take an hour or two to learn, as long as the rider has some basics.. for example, can keep the bike upright riding in a straight line, and can execute a stop without dropping the bike.

  13. #58

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by SPX View Post
    Yes, I did the test on a R1100S. It’s capable of doing the DMV maneuvers with ease.
    What part of Ca are you in? Even if you’re far, if you’ve got good riding nearby, I could perhaps be persuaded to come up and teach you how. It would take just a few hours, max.

    Thanks for the kind offer! I booked a course and if I can't get this down on an1100s will just do the CMSP as I now know someone has done it on a R1100S

    They either do the state approved course, or they take the test at the DMV. I’ve never encountered a bike incapable of navigating the DMV maneuvers.



    How to do the (fairly basic) maneuvers required by DMV, it should only take an hour or two to learn, as long as the rider has some basics.. for example, can keep the bike upright riding in a straight line, and can execute a stop without dropping the bike.
    Thanks for the offer as I booked a course and will woodshed some more and go to DMV

  14. #59

    Thanks

    Thanks for the kind offer! I booked a course and if I can't get this down on a 1100s will just do the CMSP as I now know someone has done it on a R1100S which I was sure was possible. Just need more practice I guess.

  15. #60
    Registered User motor10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Spotsylvania VA
    Posts
    64
    When I learned to do the keyhole I was told its all about head and eyes. You are almost looking behind you over your shoulder. You stay seated and lean the bike, keeping you upper body upright bending at the waist to counter balance. You need to enter into the circle on the opposite side of the entrance from the direction you plan to go. So, for explanation sake lets say you are going to do the keyhole counterclockwise. Start driving straight towards the entrance of the keyhole while slipping your clutch (keeping it in the friction zone) while setting your throttle at an appropriate RPM and applying the rear break with the edge of your foot. If you apply too much foot you will become less sensitive and begin being choppy with the whole process and then have to make adjustments with either the throttle or clutch neither of which you really want to be doing.

    As you enter the bottom of the keyhole, stay in the friction zone of the clutch, while giving the appropriate amount throttle and using the edge of your foot on the rear break. Keep to the far left of the entrance. You then want to look right then lean the bike right aiming towards the first cone or edge of the circle where it meets the entrance. Stay as close as you can to that point to give yourself the most room to start your circle. As rear tire passes turn head and eyes as far left as you can and lean the bike to the left. Stay in the friction zone of the clutch, while giving the appropriate amount throttle and using the edge of your foot on the rear break throughout the exercise until you have completed your second circle. As you approach the exit turn your head right, look right then lean the bike right as you exit. Again the key is to turn your head and look far enough over your shoulder to complete a tight circle.

    I hope I explained that well.
    “Faster, Faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death.” - Hunter S. Thompson

Similar Threads

  1. Slow skills/dry clutch
    By chord97 in forum Oilheads
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-05-2007, 04:40 PM
  2. Riding Skills ?: Rain
    By mika in forum Campfire
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-06-2006, 01:16 AM
  3. Adventure Camping Skills?
    By mika in forum Campfire
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 12-27-2005, 06:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •