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Thread: Rear brake fluid reservoir

  1. #16
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls1150 View Post
    Just for my fellow tool-hogs, here's the difference (picture pulled off the 'net) ...
    I never heard of Torx Plus until we got the R1200RSs.
    Riding down a boring road I noticed the screws on the brake reservoir cover looked different than the clutch reservoir cover.
    At first I thought the brake reservoir screws were messed up but when I stopped and took a close look they were fine, just different.
    I didn't find any torx plus bits locally so I got one from Amazon.
    https://www.amazon.com/OTC-6183-TORX.../dp/B000O846RQ

    If BMW used torx plus on one cover to mess with us I wish they had put torx plus on the clutch reservoir cover.
    I have no reason to touch that cover.
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  2. #17
    #13338 PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    If BMW used torx plus on one cover to mess with us I wish they had put torx plus on the clutch reservoir cover.
    I have no reason to touch that cover.
    Are they interchangeable?

    Are the brakes Brembo?

    Do you suppose diffferent suppliers? Poor specifications? Use what they send?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  3. #18
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Are they interchangeable?

    Are the brakes Brembo?

    Do you suppose diffferent suppliers? Poor specifications? Use what they send?
    The parts fiche shows different lengths, so I didn't try to swap them.
    Brembo brakes.

    Not a big deal and I could probably use a tox bit on the torx plus fasteners because they take very little torx, but I like to use the correct tool
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  4. #19
    This is a great thread. Can anyone confirm the size/specs of speedbleeders I should get? Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by craydds View Post
    2019 R1250RT, 12K service in progress. Got my Speed Bleeders in the mail yesterday. Will flush brake system this evening.

  5. #20
    I have used both the plated steel and the stainless steel versions, and prefer the stainless ones.
    I've installed about 25 sets of these.
    The cost is double for the stainless, but at $15 each, they are worth it.

    These numbers are for Brembo brakes only.

    Front RH=SB8125L-SS LH=SB6100-SS Rear=SB1010S-SS The dash SS =Stainless Steel.

    http://www.speedbleeder.com/bikechart.htm

    As an added note, if you are going to do a brake bleed/flush, the new recommended brake fluid is now DOT4 LV (low viscosity) for just about all BMW bikes.
    This is to enhance the functionality of the DTC and rapid response of the ABS units.
    https://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/sho...diagId=02_0125

    Here's the list of bikes it's now spec'd for.
    https://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/par...&q=83132467961

  6. #21
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by windsailor97 View Post
    This is a great thread. Can anyone confirm the size/specs of speedbleeders I should get? Thanks!
    One size fits all if you use this Motion Pro bleeder.

    Motion Pro.jpg
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  7. #22
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    One size fits all if you use this Motion Pro bleeder.

    Motion Pro.jpg
    I use one of those.... even on my bikes with Speed Bleeders installed. I find that it is easier to use with silicon tubing installed; it is available from the Speed Bleeder folks. When I used it with the harder tubing I observed air being sucked into the hose around the nipple on some bikes. That went away with the use of the silicon tubing.
    Kevin Huddy
    Silver City, Montana
    MOA# 24,790 Ambassador

  8. #23
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I use one of those.... even on my bikes with Speed Bleeders installed. I find that it is easier to use with silicon tubing installed; it is available from the Speed Bleeder folks. When I used it with the harder tubing I observed air being sucked into the hose around the nipple on some bikes. That went away with the use of the silicon tubing.
    Thanks for the tip.
    Do you have the link?
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  9. #24

  10. #25
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boxflyer View Post
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  11. #26

  12. #27
    Redneck Oregonian radiofun1's Avatar
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    How much brake fluid is in the abs pump? And how necessary is it to cycle the pump to get that out if you're changing the fluid every 2 years?

  13. #28
    Totally an estimation on my part...maybe around 30cc, or equivalent to about 2 tablespoons in all the passageways. But...only a very few of the passageways are not in the direct path of normal flushing of the front or rear system.

    I do the GS-911 module activation of the flush routine every other year and a normal (non GS-911) direct flush every year.
    The reason I do the brake fluid renew annually is because I live in an area where there are large temperature swings as well as very humid conditions that can cause the brake fluid to absorb atmospheric moisture.

    MORE IMPORTANT than cycling the ABS pump is the idea that you need to get the old brake fluid out from behind the pistons in the caliper bodies and replace that volume with fresh brake fluid that has not been soaking up moisture since the last flush.

    Firstly, I clean all exposed surfaces of the caliper pistons, since the next step will push any accumulated crud past the caliper seals and could damage them. There are difficult sides of the pistons to get to with a soft tooth brush or similar cleaning tool, so I use a shoe lace around the tight areas and use a sawing/polishing motion to get then entire circumference totally clean.

    Next, extract the fluid from the reservoir on the front or rear circuit, as you would normally, as well as to make room for the caliper fluid volume. Then push the clean pistons back into the calipers until they are bottomed out...and that will be the most old fluid back up the lines and past the bleed screws. On the front with the pair of calipers, it takes some shimming with either old brake pads and some cabinet shims, or whatever you feel will work for you to keep both calipers with the 8 pistons wedged firmly into the calipers simultaneously. Now extract all remaining old brake fluid from the reservoir so you can start adding fresh DOT4 LV (low viscosity) brake fluid.

    Fill up the reservoir so that it has about 3/4 capacity and won't slosh out with the work you are doing on the fork legs and hand brake lever...not so much a concern on the rear circuit.
    On the front, it doesn't matter which side you do first as they are equidistant from the reservoir, but if your bike has different lengths for the LH and RH supply lines, do the most distant caliper first.

    Since I use SpeedBleeders on just about every bike I work on, I crack open the bleed screw about 1/4 turn with the silicone tube running up, before down, to the catch bag from SpeedBleeder.com.
    I simply pump slowly watching the color of the old fluid in the silicone tube and keep an eye on the reservoir so it never gets close to becoming low and could suck in some air. When the old yellow fluid is replace with clear fresh fluid, that side is good.
    On the front, I bleed both supply lines before doing the next step which is, remove all the blocking or whatever you were using to keep the pistons bottomed out, and remount the caliper with the pads in place for normal operation. I use a small amount of Silaramic on the high load contact points of the backing plates of the pads.

    Up until this point, the focus was to refresh the fluid starting at the reservoir, down to the ABS pump, thru all of the normal circuits of that module, then all the lines out to the wheel calipers bleed screws. Whatever fluid you pushed back up the lines when you bottomed the caliper pistons is now out of the system and there is fresh fluid right up to the bleed screws.

    Now when you mount the calipers with pads, keeping the reservoir pretty full, any new fluid that pushes the pistons out will be new/fresh DOT4 LV.
    Keep in mind that anytime you are reusing pads, that in the future, pushing your pistons back into the calipers could overflow the reservoir if you now top off the fluid to the fullest mark. Just be mindful of reservoir levels from now on doing maintenance such as installing new pads between flushing/topping off of the reservoir.

    Sorry this is such a thread drift, but it is tough to just put out snippets of information in reply to specific questions sometimes.
    Hope this helps.

  14. #29
    Redneck Oregonian radiofun1's Avatar
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    Great info. Thanks. I just speed bleeders for this new to me wet head. Have installed speed bleeders on past bike and they make bleeding infinitely easier. Regarding torx plus, i believe the final drive drain plug is also torx plus. I used a regular torx to remove the plug and it came out easily. Low torque setting.

  15. #30
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by radiofun1 View Post
    Regarding torx plus, i believe the final drive drain plug is also torx plus. .
    I think you're right.
    Here's the final drive drain plug om the R1200RS.
    Final Drive Drain (1).JPG


    Same plug on the K1300S.
    Final drive plug reduced.JPG
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

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