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Thread: Pandemic Has Kick-started an Urban Motorcycle Boom. Are Cities Rready?

  1. #1
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Pandemic Has Kick-started an Urban Motorcycle Boom. Are Cities Rready?

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...otorcycle-boom

    An interesting piece that correlates with the small supply of sale-ready bikes in my dealerís showroom. Some interesting points and possibilities raised...

    Best,
    DeVern
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST ó 1984 R80 G/S-PD ó 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C ó 2010 K1300GT ó 2018 R1200GS
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  2. #2
    Rally Rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider View Post
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...otorcycle-boom

    An interesting piece that correlates with the small supply of sale-ready bikes in my dealerís showroom. Some interesting points and possibilities raised...

    Best,
    DeVern
    The section on MC noise was disheartening. We are our own worst enemy.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider View Post
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...otorcycle-boom

    An interesting piece that correlates with the small supply of sale-ready bikes in my dealerís showroom. Some interesting points and possibilities raised...

    Best,
    DeVern
    Read what PM 25 is.
    Brake and tire wear left on roadways!
    I can't believe this!

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    Seems clear to me: In the (near) future we who are still riding will likely be on electric 2-wheelers.
    Royce
    On the coast of Kansas
    2012 F800ST

  5. #5
    Registered User jad01's Avatar
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    Particulate Matter (PM) 2.5

    I think they were referring to PM 2.5 in the article, long a problem air pollutant of heightened concern due to its small size:
    1. Particle Pollution
    2. Health Effects of Pariculate Matter

    A brief search yielded a couple of peer-reviewed research articles:
    1. Human health risk assessment of Tire and Road Wear Particles (TRWP) in air
    2. Evaluation of Tire Wear Contribution to PM2.5 in Urban Environments

    IMO, the interesting part of our understanding of particulate matter effects is the impact of microplastics to low-income, urban, and ethnic minority populations in and near high traffic areas. In Houston, there is increasing awareness of the correlation between increased health risk and exposure to PM 2.5 associated with major roadways, but it wouldn't be surprising to see similar correlations between chronic microplastic exposure from vehicle-related PM 2.5 in the ambient air in these areas to other end points like cancers and developmental disorders.
    Jim (MOA 83200)
    '78 R80/7 (Anastasia) and '84 R100RS (The Millennium Falcon), '86 K75C (Icy Hot)
    '90 and '93 Mazda Miatas (Jelly Bean and Red Hot), '97 Nissan XE PU (Mighty Mouse)
    '96 Giant Upland (big Kendas, baby!)

  6. #6
    Rally Rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by jad01 View Post
    I think they were referring to PM 2.5 in the article, long a problem air pollutant of heightened concern due to its small size:
    1. Particle Pollution
    2. Health Effects of Pariculate Matter

    A brief search yielded a couple of peer-reviewed research articles:
    1. Human health risk assessment of Tire and Road Wear Particles (TRWP) in air
    2. Evaluation of Tire Wear Contribution to PM2.5 in Urban Environments

    IMO, the interesting part of our understanding of particulate matter effects is the impact of microplastics to low-income, urban, and ethnic minority populations in and near high traffic areas. In Houston, there is increasing awareness of the correlation between increased health risk and exposure to PM 2.5 associated with major roadways, but it wouldn't be surprising to see similar correlations between chronic microplastic exposure from vehicle-related PM 2.5 in the ambient air in these areas to other end points like cancers and developmental disorders.
    Mechanics have been warned for many decades on the dangers of brake dust. Just consider to amount of brake dust generated on a busy urban boulevard with stop lights at every block. Rapid accel, followed by decel. Continuously during day.

    Sprawl, without plannning, can easily create these situations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jad01 View Post
    I think they were referring to PM 2.5 in the article, long a problem air pollutant of heightened concern due to its small size:
    1. Particle Pollution
    2. Health Effects of Pariculate Matter

    A brief search yielded a couple of peer-reviewed research articles:
    1. Human health risk assessment of Tire and Road Wear Particles (TRWP) in air
    2. Evaluation of Tire Wear Contribution to PM2.5 in Urban Environments

    IMO, the interesting part of our understanding of particulate matter effects is the impact of microplastics to low-income, urban, and ethnic minority populations in and near high traffic areas. In Houston, there is increasing awareness of the correlation between increased health risk and exposure to PM 2.5 associated with major roadways, but it wouldn't be surprising to see similar correlations between chronic microplastic exposure from vehicle-related PM 2.5 in the ambient air in these areas to other end points like cancers and developmental disorders.
    Yes, brake dust and micro bits of rubber [ tire wear] left on roadways is what PM 25 is talking about.

  8. #8
    Registered User jad01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Mechanics have been warned for many decades on the dangers of brake dust. Just consider to amount of brake dust generated on a busy urban boulevard with stop lights at every block. Rapid accel, followed by decel. Continuously during day.

    Sprawl, without plannning, can easily create these situations.
    Absolutely. By coincidence, I am sitting in on a microplastics workshop today and tire wear and microplastics came up as an area of needed research, so no doubt, more data on exposure risk to come.
    Jim (MOA 83200)
    '78 R80/7 (Anastasia) and '84 R100RS (The Millennium Falcon), '86 K75C (Icy Hot)
    '90 and '93 Mazda Miatas (Jelly Bean and Red Hot), '97 Nissan XE PU (Mighty Mouse)
    '96 Giant Upland (big Kendas, baby!)

  9. #9
    Registered User jad01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUGENE View Post
    Yes, brake dust and micro bits of rubber [ tire wear] left on roadways is what PM 25 is talking about.
    Yes, you are correct, but I think the article meant to refer to PM 2 point 5, as in 2.5 micrometers or less (not PM 25)- I think that was a misprint on behalf of the article. PM 25 (25 microns) fall in a much larger range of particles that, when inhaled, are filtered out of your sytem before reaching your lungs (and thus your bloodstream) and present far less risk of health affects.
    Jim (MOA 83200)
    '78 R80/7 (Anastasia) and '84 R100RS (The Millennium Falcon), '86 K75C (Icy Hot)
    '90 and '93 Mazda Miatas (Jelly Bean and Red Hot), '97 Nissan XE PU (Mighty Mouse)
    '96 Giant Upland (big Kendas, baby!)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jad01 View Post
    Yes, you are correct, but I think the article meant to refer to PM 2 point 5, as in 2.5 micrometers or less (not PM 25)- I think that was a misprint on behalf of the article. PM 25 (25 microns) fall in a much larger range of particles that, when inhaled, are filtered out of your sytem before reaching your lungs (and thus your bloodstream) and present far less risk of health affects.
    Not the first time a journalist blew it by a decimal point.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jad01 View Post
    Absolutely. By coincidence, I am sitting in on a microplastics workshop today and tire wear and microplastics came up as an area of needed research, so no doubt, more data on exposure risk to come.
    Perhaps, there's a reason why so many low income children suffer from asthma.....

  12. #12
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUGENE View Post
    Yes, brake dust and micro bits of rubber [ tire wear] left on roadways is what PM 25 is talking about.
    And remember that brake pads used to contain asbestos. https://asbestosvictimadvice.com/201...asbestos-risk/

    I am reminded of "death hill" in northern Kentucky where I-75NB dives down steeply to cross over the Ohio River. Must have been tons of asbestos in that area back in the day.

    And the above article points out that some brake pads from China still contain asbestos.

    Harry
    My fleet: 2015 R1200GS, 2017 Toyota Prius Prime (plug-in hybrid)

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    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Canada is cleaning up some Asbestos

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-54608836

    I watched someone wither and die from mesothelioma. An ugly way to go.

    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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  14. #14
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUGENE View Post
    Read what PM 25 is.
    Brake and tire wear left on roadways!
    I can't believe this!
    To me this kind of measurement is consistent with the measurements done of highway and roadside lead levels which helped make the case for unleaded fuel. All that rubber wearing off of tires doesn't evaporate.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  15. #15
    Registered User r0ckrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREGFEELER View Post
    To me this kind of measurement is consistent with the measurements done of highway and roadside lead levels which helped make the case for unleaded fuel. All that rubber wearing off of tires doesn't evaporate.
    No, it doesn't evaporate. But it does become airborne. It also washes off the roadways (and surrounding areas) and into the watershed, where the contaminates dissolve into the water. The particulates that remain continue to get washed downstream and become part of the sediment.

    In dryer climates, the particulates spend much more time airborne, until it either settles in various corners or is lifted on the wind to be deposited with rain somewhere else.

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