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Thread: Dunlop Road Smart 3 tires AKA tire thread #2372-106A

  1. #16
    Nick Kennedy
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    Those Dunlop RS3's were on a Kawasaki C-14 - Kawasaki recommended pressure F/R 44 psi

  2. #17
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Tires that Iíve mounted for the past dozen or so years have had the manufacturerís maximum allowable inflation pressure printed on the sidewall, as required by the DOT. The max safe pressure is almost always 42 PSI although Iíve seen a Shinko that was marked 41 PSI. I do not work with tires for light weight/dirt bikes, so I do not know the typical max pressure for those. Interesting that Kawasaki would recommend pressures that exceed the tire manufacturerís safe limit. I think I would have stuck with what the tire manufacturer specified.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    Tires that I’ve mounted for the past dozen or so years have had the manufacturer’s maximum allowable inflation pressure printed on the sidewall, as required by the DOT. The max safe pressure is almost always 42 PSI although I’ve seen a Shinko that was marked 41 PSI. I do not work with tires for light weight/dirt bikes, so I do not know the typical max pressure for those. Interesting that Kawasaki would recommend pressures that exceed the tire manufacturer’s safe limit. I think I would have stuck with what the tire manufacturer specified.
    Kevin, I did a search using Google and found at least a half dozen references in COG and other Forums that explicitly state that Kawasaki recommends 42F, 42R.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 04-04-2020 at 04:29 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  4. #19
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Thatís reassuring.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  5. #20
    Nick Kennedy
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    Ya know I checked and you guys are right about the C-14
    42 F/R
    Whoops
    don't know how that 44 number got stuck in my head..
    Thanks for that.
    I ordered some Dunlop RS2's
    Way cheaper, going to see how long those go this spring.
    I would be willing to bet they go about the same.
    Ride safe in 2020

  6. #21
    Registered User drneo66's Avatar
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    Moshe did a review a while back. He writes for several leading moto magazines...

    Current: 2007 BMW R1200RT, 2013 F800GS
    Former: 1995 BMW K75S, 2009 BMW G650GS
    MOA Member #:150400, IBA#: 37558

  7. #22
    Nick Kennedy
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    Thank you for posting that vid.
    Interesting and well done.
    To bad for me I only got 1/3 rd the mileage he got!
    And snow it goes..
    Nick

  8. #23
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by drneo66 View Post
    Moshe did a review a while back. He writes for several leading moto magazines.[/video]
    This guy is really easy to listen to. Thanks for this link!

    Interesting comment at around 1:30 and 5:20.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by stooie View Post
    Chip seal is apparently about as tire friendly as a wood rasp or cheese grater.....The lovely country roads through the farm and wine country of western Oregon are all chip seal.
    And God help you if you ever go down on that stuff. I can imagine leather might hold up a bit longer but synthetics will probably shred very fast. On the flip side traction should be better as long as the chip is bound hard which it normally seems to be. I rode out to Newport from Eugene a few years back and that didn't seem to be chip seal at the time.

  10. #25
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    On the flip side traction should be better.....
    With a smaller contact patch due to the "valleys" between the chips inherent in this type of roadway, the traction would be reduced as compared to smooth asphalt. The same reason slick tires provide more dry traction than treaded tires.

    You're right that falling off on a "tar and chip" surface would likely shred one's gear, and then one's self, in short order!

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    With a smaller contact patch due to the "valleys" between the chips inherent in this type of roadway, the traction would be reduced as compared to smooth asphalt. The same reason slick tires provide more dry traction than treaded tires.
    I absolutely disagree. Which grips rubber better: a smooth metal yardstick or a wood rasp?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  12. #27
    Registered User stooie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    \On the flip side traction should be better ...
    Interesting topic!

    Our tire engineer friends breakdown tire grip into the categories "chemical grip" and "mechanical grip"

    Chemical grip is a function of how sticky the rubber is. This is the primary grip for a warmed up racing slick on smooth asphalt.

    Mechanical grip the force generated by the tire conforming to the irregularities of the road surface. This may very well be enhanced on the right chip seal surface.

    i'd like to see data. I'm guessing that the optimal grip is a racing tire on a smooth surface. After that we get into the possible combinations of tire compounds and tread patterns on smoother and less so asphalt and varying chip surfaces that might give all kinds of results.

    Where the irregular chip seal surface might provide an advantage in on a rainy surface as it might drain a bit better.

    I think I'm going to stick with my plan to ride conservatively enough on the streets to not find out. I'll confine my testing of my limits and those of the tires to the relatively low speeds of the kart tracks when I go to play, oops, I mean "train", there.

    Please be careful as you conduct your own experiments on this issue!
    Bob Stewart
    Salem, OR

    2018 RT

  13. #28
    I have an old tire I would like to cut in two. Which side of my saw blade should I use? Smooth edge down or tooth edge down? Which would be the hardest to push with my old arthritic shoulder?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  14. #29
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    The traction on chip seal can be great. It is akin to riding on sand paper..... until you encounter a patch where the gravel has been pushed into the slurry leaving a nice patch of quite slippery and hardened tar. Essentially a tar snake on steroids and especially exciting when wet. Then there are the places where lose gravel builds up; also a heart accelerator.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  15. #30
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I have an old tire I would like to cut in two. Which side of my saw blade should I use? Smooth edge down or tooth edge down? Which would be the hardest to push with my old arthritic shoulder?
    I suggest that you hold the blade and beat the tire with the reciprocating handle/motor/battery assembly. This may pinch a little.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

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