Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: 1955 R50 Question

  1. #16
    Registered User cwroady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    OC, SoCal
    Posts
    72
    I clearly understand, and although I do have a modern RT, my daily rider is a 1973 75/5 and I have not been without a motorcycle for over 50 years. I know I have a lot to learn about this particular bike and appreciate the dialogue. Just wanted to give you a little of my background also to explain I’m not a rookie when it comes to knowing what is a bike limitation vs something not right.

    Edit to update: Vech replied that the block C's and German Heidenau do in fact dance in rain grooves and even went on to say when he had ridden on them out of state, that it was scary (was my reaction as well) .. he mentioned Avons have a different type tread pattern but doesn't know first hand how they react to rain grooves. Bottom line for me is perhaps this simply supports your comment of knowing the limitations and factoring them into my ride. Glad to have some confidence it wasn't due to alignment, shot bearings, etc.
    Last edited by cwroady; 02-03-2020 at 04:11 PM.
    Chris - 2015 BMW RT / 1973 BMW R75/5 / 1955 BMW R50 - Yard Art - 1968 Hodaka / 1968 Sachs
    President SCBMWRC https://scbmwrc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/scbmwrc/
    MOA / Airhead Beemer Club

  2. #17
    Registered User cwroady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    OC, SoCal
    Posts
    72
    Update ... I got a nice little 135+ mile loop in yesterday thru a couple of my local canyons called Silverado Canyon and Ortega Hwy and even a little rain grooved freeway that didn't produce as much negative reaction as I experienced on the stretch near my home.

    Bike really ran nice and is surprisingly strong for a little, low HP 500. My "needing attention" list is growing though. I had eliminated the obvious oil leaks, but an extended ride identified a few more. Front crank seal is now on the list (maybe a silver lining indicating the slingers are doing their job?) as is the pinion gear seal.

    I stopped at a local cafe called Hells Kitchen for a photo. There was only one other person there (closed) who walked up as soon as I dismounted and asked if I was interested in selling my bike hahaha ... man I just bought it ... no!

    Since I still can't seem to get any pics posted, perhaps I can get around it with this link to my Instagram account with some pics I took yesterday?

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B8N0zaTj...eV6f08BNrJvM0/
    Chris - 2015 BMW RT / 1973 BMW R75/5 / 1955 BMW R50 - Yard Art - 1968 Hodaka / 1968 Sachs
    President SCBMWRC https://scbmwrc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/scbmwrc/
    MOA / Airhead Beemer Club

  3. #18
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    20,892
    Quote Originally Posted by cwroady View Post
    I had eliminated the obvious oil leaks, but an extended ride identified a few more. Front crank seal is now on the list (maybe a silver lining indicating the slingers are doing their job?) as is the pinion gear seal.
    Not quite sure what you're referring to, but the slingers are positioned quite near the main big end bearings at the center of the engine. They separate out any particulates in the oil and then feed the main bearing surfaces. If there's leaking at the front crank, then it's an issue with the seal there. What pinion gear are you describing? Is that at the final drive?

    Since I still can't seem to get any pics posted, perhaps I can get around it with this link to my Instagram account with some pics I took yesterday?
    Instagram didn't work for me. Not sure why you're having troubles posting pictures. If you need to see some of the steps needed to upload pictures, I can show you that. Usually the problem is with pictures being too big in size. If they are more in the 1Mb range, uploading shouldn't be an issue.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  4. #19
    Registered User cwroady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    OC, SoCal
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Not quite sure what you're referring to, but the slingers are positioned quite near the main big end bearings at the center of the engine. They separate out any particulates in the oil and then feed the main bearing surfaces. If there's leaking at the front crank, then it's an issue with the seal there. .
    Clearly neither do I 😂. I was just being hopeful that if oil was getting to a bad front crank seal (that I have ordered) that maybe that means the slingers were doing a good job of lubricating the internals. Having never been inside to see them, I guess it is just a case of my rookie-ness showing.
    Chris - 2015 BMW RT / 1973 BMW R75/5 / 1955 BMW R50 - Yard Art - 1968 Hodaka / 1968 Sachs
    President SCBMWRC https://scbmwrc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/scbmwrc/
    MOA / Airhead Beemer Club

  5. #20

    The oil leak and slingers and front seal leak are different issues

    The Crank Shaft Oil Slingers do just that, they "sling" oil out and up to the bottom side of the piston and the small end of the connecting rod for cooling and lubrication. The "slingers" are simple pressed sheet metal disc's with a trough / channel that fills with oil while the motor is running and at some point over flows and slings oil out to the bottom side of the piston and the small end of the connecting rod. Over time and after many hours and miles of the motor running the trough / channels on the slingers get filled with "GUNK", "SOLID GUNK" and don't hold oil and even stop slinging oil up the the piston base and small end of the connecting rod. THE SLINGERS DO NOT FILTER THE OIL! THEY COOL AND LUBRICATE THE BOTTOM OF THE PISTON AND THE BRASS BUSHING ON THE SMALL END OF THE CONNECTING ROD.

    Servicing (cleaning) the slingers requires some major surgery to the motorcycle but in the long run is well worth the time, money and education if you wish to preserve your investment in BMW history. You must remove the motor and disassemble it just to inspect the "oil slingers" to see if there is an issue with them. Plan on new gaskets and seals along with other shop supplies. Vech at Bench Mark Works has a pretty good explanation of how the slingers work and the importance of at least inspecting and cleaning as needed.

    I was hesitant to tackle an inspection and cleaning out of the "oil slingers" on my '55 R 50 but I'm glad I got the tools and followed the directions.

  6. #21
    Registered User cwroady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    OC, SoCal
    Posts
    72
    Thanks for that. I imagine the hesitancy to do the major tear down is common when all seems well .. I feel it too. the voice in the back of my head says no maintenance documentation and 79k on the odo make it a risky thing to ignore. Iím thinking I want to enjoy a few rides before digging in though ... but keep remembering my advice to my grown children when they were small to not ignore that little voice in your head 😳
    Chris - 2015 BMW RT / 1973 BMW R75/5 / 1955 BMW R50 - Yard Art - 1968 Hodaka / 1968 Sachs
    President SCBMWRC https://scbmwrc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/scbmwrc/
    MOA / Airhead Beemer Club

  7. #22
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    20,892
    On both my pre 1970 bikes, I rode them for a year before I started major overhauls. I wanted to get a sense of the bike and see what else might need attention. The R69S had about 27K miles on it...the slingers were getting fairly full. The R25/2 had 15K kilometers on it...likely 115K kilometers. Completely unknown maintenance history. I did discover that the cylinder was first-over so someone had been in there before...it was a police bike in Germany, so probably done by/for the police department. Slingers were fine but I couldn't tell until I got inside.

    The slingers will need to be done at some point. Probably do it once on your watch and you'll never have to worry about it again. Peace of mind is a good thing!
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-17-2015, 01:34 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-11-2011, 02:51 AM
  3. moved my 1955 r50 inside the other day...
    By OldAndBusted in forum Vintage
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-11-2007, 03:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •