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Thread: Pavement paranoia!

  1. #61

    Nice Thread.

    Just a quick response on visibility and lane position. I have recently, in the last 12 months or so changed my habitual lane position from left wheel track to right wheel track (closer to the fog line). After watching a video study David Peterson (Best Rest Products) did, I was able to see the enhanced conspicuity of pushing that bike further right, not to mention the increased degree of reaction time and maneuver space gained from oncoming traffic crossing the center line usually due to texting or fixation.

    I also have clear-water yellow covers over my darlas that I run in the daylight to enhance that oncoming visual footprint.

    Here is an article I recently wrote for the Army Safety Center as a motorcycle mentor. It touched on some of the points made in this thread.

    https://safety.army.mil/MEDIA/Risk-M...2-PLR-Analysis
    R. Reece Mullins Ebony R1200RT (Gretchen)
    MOA # 143779
    MOA Charter Club #5 #364 #100
    BMW MOA Vice President

  2. #62
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangerreece View Post
    Just a quick response on visibility and lane position. I have recently, in the last 12 months or so changed my habitual lane position from left wheel track to right wheel track (closer to the fog line). After watching a video study David Peterson (Best Rest Products) did, I was able to see the enhanced conspicuity of pushing that bike further right, not to mention the increased degree of reaction time and maneuver space gained from oncoming traffic crossing the center line usually due to texting or fixation.

    I also have clear-water yellow covers over my darlas that I run in the daylight to enhance that oncoming visual footprint.

    Here is an article I recently wrote for the Army Safety Center as a motorcycle mentor. It touched on some of the points made in this thread.

    https://safety.army.mil/MEDIA/Risk-M...2-PLR-Analysis
    The only downside with riding in the left track is, possibly, failing to protect your lane. As you note, maximizing your field of view and visibility (others seeing you) should be the first order decision.
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    The only downside with riding in the left track is, possibly, failing to protect your lane. As you note, maximizing your field of view and visibility (others seeing you) should be the first order decision.
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I believe the answer to which side of the lane is the safest place to be is...... it depends.
    Both valid points. To be clear, what I meant by habitual lane position was that my “default” lane position has changed. My lane position changes probably 20-30 times on my commute to work, however I have learned to “gravitate” to the right more than I did in years past; and it has saved my bacon more than once, since applying the change.
    R. Reece Mullins Ebony R1200RT (Gretchen)
    MOA # 143779
    MOA Charter Club #5 #364 #100
    BMW MOA Vice President

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I believe the answer to which side of the lane is the safest place to be is...... it depends.
    Yup, situationally dependent.

    Like Reese, I tend to gravitate slightly right in my lane normally.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by wildbears View Post
    The Bell Star MIPS Full Face Helmet is an example of a carbon fiber composite shell with MIPS technology.

    The Tri-Matrix Composite Shell is a proprietary mix of Aramid, carbon fiber, and fiberglass said to deliver all the strength of carbon fiber in a more budget–minded package.

    As noted in another thread, the fibers are thought to spread out impact force.

    A MIPS® energy management system is included.

    Looks like a state of the art helmet for ultimate noggin protection.

    About $500.



    Attachment 77339
    So, what certifications does this helmet have. DOT? Snell? European?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  6. #66
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    So, what certifications does this helmet have. DOT? Snell? European?
    They're Snell rated, but they're still a company that sources product from places unknown. Just go to their website and try to find an address for the corporate headquarters. Eventually, you'll find yourself at something called Vista Outdoor Brands (under media releases). It's a compendium of former known brands frequently found at Walmart.

    It's just me, but I tend to trust Shoei, Arai and Schubert. But, I have seen nice looking HJC Snell rated full face helmets for $130. The comfort padding is a bit stiff and they're made in Vietnam, but they're still Snell rated.
    Last edited by 36654; 02-26-2020 at 08:41 PM.
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by wildbears View Post
    Anger Management

    Loosing it on the road puts the rider at more risk than the original offending behavior.

    Anger can limit rational thought and action.

    Shift the paradigm and forgive the offender.

    This emotionally removes you from the situation and permits safe riding.

    One way is to view the incident as an unintentional error or otherwise unexplained action.

    As long as you consider the driver's action an insult or act of aggression, forgiveness is difficult and anger hard to avoid.

    And if you make a mistake that could be taken the wrong way, you can proactively shift the paradigm for others affected.

    Patting the side of your helmets indicates an apology for a stupid move.
    Never heard of it, I'll ask some of the riders in several of the motor groups I ride with in the coming weekends. I'd be surprised if many of them have heard of this either. If relatively few have heard of this that ride, even fewer cagers have likely heard of this either. For something to indicate a message of any kind, it has to be fairly universally recognized by both motors and cagers.

    I wonder how many members here have this knowledge.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  8. #68
    Registered User jonnybow's Avatar
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    My experience, patting your head means there's a police officer ahead shooting radar
    Jon
    K1600GT & R1200GSA
    BMW MOA #220293

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by wildbears View Post
    Patting the side of your helmets indicates an apology for a stupid move.
    Say what? Whose sign language is this? Who teaches this? How many soccer moms, teenagers, or truck drivers know this? How did they learn it?

    When riding with my wife Voni I have sometimes on occasion pounded lightly on the side of my helmet to indicate what we just saw somebody do was a dunderhead move. She knows what I mean but I never dreamed somebody would think I was apologizing. Wow!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  10. #70
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    I have been riding for 50 years and this is the first time I have heard of patting the side of your helmet was an apology. Tap the top ment cops ahead.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  11. #71
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Say what? Whose sign language is this? Who teaches this? How many soccer moms, teenagers, or truck drivers know this? How did they learn it?

    When riding with my wife Voni I have sometimes on occasion pounded lightly on the side of my helmet to indicate what we just saw somebody do was a dunderhead move. She knows what I mean but I never dreamed somebody would think I was apologizing. Wow!
    My wife pounded on the sides of my helmet when she got a Charlie Horse (i.e., muscle cramp) in both sides of the hip. The pounding stopped at the next stop sign. I found her rolling in pain on somebody's front lawn.

    That's what I know about pounding or tapping on helmets......
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Never heard of it, I'll ask some of the riders in several of the motor groups I ride with in the coming weekends. I'd be surprised if many of them have heard of this either. If relatively few have heard of this that ride, even fewer cagers have likely heard of this either. For something to indicate a message of any kind, it has to be fairly universally recognized by both motors and cagers.

    I wonder how many members here have this knowledge.
    Hand and headlight signals are excellent ways to confuse or irritate other drivers. Proceed with caution. They're big, you're small.
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  13. #73
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Say what? Whose sign language is this? Who teaches this? How many soccer moms, teenagers, or truck drivers know this? How did they learn it?

    When riding with my wife Voni I have sometimes on occasion pounded lightly on the side of my helmet to indicate what we just saw somebody do was a dunderhead move. She knows what I mean but I never dreamed somebody would think I was apologizing. Wow!

    Geez, Paul.............According to Leif's comment on this thread..........."Actually the hand signs are part of the curriculum for both motorcycle and car driver licenses:-)"
    https://www.motorcyclelegalfoundatio...signals-chart/

    As you and Mrs. Glaves get more experienced at motorcycling, I'm sure you'll pick these things up.......
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Geez, Paul.............According to Leif's comment on this thread..........."Actually the hand signs are part of the curriculum for both motorcycle and car driver licenses:-)"
    https://www.motorcyclelegalfoundatio...signals-chart/

    As you and Mrs. Glaves get more experienced at motorcycling, I'm sure you'll pick these things up.......
    A few of those make sense for group rides, I suppose. I don't do group rides. As for the apology signal I didn't see it listed or illustrated.

    As for license curriculum, these signals are not taught in Texas, Kansas, Iowa, for sure. I call balderdash on that one, but it is, after all, the internet.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #75
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    What about when the ADV Lady gives you a sign?

    https://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread...o-see-me-today

    OM
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