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Thread: Why is it recommended to hang your butt off the seat when in aggressive cornering

  1. #61
    Back in the saddle again mikegalbicka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanColes View Post
    My philosophy has always been to expect everything you can imagine, and don't rule out things you could never have imagined.
    Amen to that!

  2. #62
    Dress for fall & avoid it AlanColes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    To poke a little here, that sounds logical for eastern Canada where the two-lane speed limits are 90 kph and 10 clicks over gets you up to 62 or so miles per hour. Here in west Texas and much of the rest of the western US we find curvy two lane roads with a speed limit of 75 mph. If I then ride 10 clicks (6 mph) over that I am running right along at about 80, not 60. Thus, quasi legal spirited riding out here may be 20 mph faster than quasi legal spirited riding in eastern Canada. Of course that is just considering the speed limits. I know lots of roads where all but the very best riders won't maintain the speed limit.
    Quite right Paul, although folks seem to have the impression that my riding pace is perhaps a bit too brisk as I do tend to keep pretty close to that 10-clicks over when the roads get interesting. ;-)

    As you and Kevin point out, the 10-clicks over rule-of-thumb doesn't work for every road. It is simply my typical cruising speed when conditions warrant. The night before last I was driving (4-wheels) back from a funeral service over snow-covered paved and dirt roads with areas of ice. In some places I was travelling at perhaps at only 50% of the posted speed limit and others it was perhaps 125% of the posted limit. My speed, perhaps like many others, tends to be a dynamic blend of my interpretation of keeping my license, how compelling the road is, as well as visibility, traction, mood, etc.

    Certainly, there are plenty of roads where there are turns that must be negotiated at speeds well below the posted limit for the overall road. Typically, these have posted corner speeds, but not always. I've ridden in areas around Kevin where I plotted out courses that kept me on very circuitous 2-lane roads over the Continental Divide. Great riding.

    This year I rode a lot of the Appalachian mountain chain (mostly in June), starting in Nova Scotia and exiting in Helen, GA. Also rode the Selkirk Mountains and the Cascades through WA this year and finished it off with leading a group of about 2-dozen riders around a couple of routes on the Cabot Trail back home in NS.

    This is a picture I always like to share of the Cabot Trail. It is definitely not the twistiest portion of the Trail, but it gives riders a good idea of what phenominal riding we'e got here.
    Cabot Trail going into Cheticamp.jpg
    Regards, Alan - President BMWONS - BMWMOA/BMWRA/BMWONS/Airheads
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  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by AlanColes View Post
    ...
    This year I rode a lot of the Appalachian mountain chain (mostly in June), starting in Nova Scotia and exiting in Helen, GA. Also rode the Selkirk Mountains and the Cascades through WA this year and finished it off with leading a group of about 2-dozen riders around a couple of routes on the Cabot Trail back home in NS.

    This is a picture I always like to share of the Cabot Trail. It is definitely not the twistiest portion of the Trail, but it gives riders a good idea of what phenominal riding we'e got here.
    Cabot Trail going into Cheticamp.jpg

    That looks like the view south towards Cheticamp from the Skyline Trail area (where the young musician was killed by coyotes.)

    Gorgeous country, and the Cabot Trail is spectacular.

  4. #64
    Dress for fall & avoid it AlanColes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vark View Post
    That looks like the view south towards Cheticamp from the Skyline Trail area (where the young musician was killed by coyotes.)

    Gorgeous country, and the Cabot Trail is spectacular.
    That's it.
    Regards, Alan - President BMWONS - BMWMOA/BMWRA/BMWONS/Airheads
    Current: 2019 R1250RT / '06 Ducati ST3s / '91 R100GS / '86 R80RT / '75 R90S / '73 850 & '70 750 Commando Prev: '14 R1200RT / '04 R1150RT / '81 Honda GL1100 / '77 Suzuki GS750 / '73 Norton 850 Commando

  5. #65
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerc60 View Post
    I found this recently posted on another forum. Confirms your approach #3.

    https://youtu.be/rDJZjdKai24
    Apparently the experts seem to be teaching the wrong cornering technique. The other disturbing thing about that rider was the skinny tires he is riding on. It just all wrong!

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Blacque Jacque Shellacque View Post
    Apparently the experts seem to be teaching the wrong cornering technique. The other disturbing thing about that rider was the skinny tires he is riding on. It just all wrong!
    And yet he was able to beat the sport bike riders doing everything right!

    Anybody notice his handlebars?

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by vark View Post
    And yet he was able to beat the sport bike riders doing everything right!

    Anybody notice his handlebars?
    When AMA racing was running at Heartland Park Topeka many years ago the track record was, for several years held by a 250cc racer, besting all the 1000 cc superbike guys. The 2.3 mile 14 turn track was well suited for the lighter, quicker, but not faster bike. The rider, John Kocinski, was no slouch on any bike but excelled on the 250.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  8. #68
    Registered User patm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vark View Post
    And yet he was able to beat the sport bike riders doing everything right!

    Anybody notice his handlebars?
    Wrong, he's got a bike to do everything left.
    His center of mass is to the left of the bike. He's stradling the saddle, not sitting in the center but to the left of it and using his left boot for leverage when the bike starts sliding the rear end.

    2019-12-04 19_41_37-Window.png

    His bike is designed for just that. Similar to flat track racers. Going around and around on an oval track. The others aren't. They're compromised for other, different purposes.
    I see his left handlebar is higher, so is his left footpeg. Why, I can only guess? More weight on the rear tire, force an upper riding position, with regular handlebars his torso would move forward?
    The left footpeg is higher to prevent it from dragging early?

    Would you ride a bike like that on the street?
    Pat

    Ride Safe!
    '16 RT

  9. #69
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by vark View Post
    And yet he was able to beat the sport bike riders doing everything right!

    Anybody notice his handlebars?
    Those bikes are set up specifically for the task at hand. Turn left, short straight, turn left, short straight, repeat. I would respectfully suggest that the sport bikes would eat its lunch on a road course.

    Further, does everyone realize that this type of "racing" is set up like horse racing? Handicaps, betting, rider colours - the whole nine yards (or meters if you're in Japan)

    Edit: Dang, patm beat me to it!

  10. #70
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    The rider, John Kocinski, was no slouch on any bike but excelled on the 250.
    He wasn't that good - only a world champion a couple years later.

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