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Thread: Navigator VI on sale

  1. #31
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajaxthegreater View Post
    Typing in a destination address on the nav 6 is like trying to send a text on a flip phone, only harder. It has lots of other good features but fails miserably on this one, and it's the one I want to use most often.
    WOW ... ironically I find the Nav6 much easier than my other Gamin GPS's to type in an address. I love that it gives you options (guesses) as you type in road and city names along with POI's

    But honestly the display is just amazing and why I spent the $$. Yes I tried sunshields on my other GPS's but on the Nav6 the display is just amazing in any light conditions.
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2018 R1200GS - Light White !
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajaxthegreater View Post
    Typing in a destination address on the nav 6 is like trying to send a text on a flip phone, only harder. It has lots of other good features but fails miserably on this one, and it's the one I want to use most often.
    Yup, one thing I hate about it. I can see why they do it that way with the small screen. Fat fingers would have trouble if the whole alphabet were up at one time. Worse with gloves.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  3. #33
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    My zumo 595 is pretty similar to the recent Navigators, so I think you should have a choice of several different keyboards. You can select several options from many languages in Settings and then use the "Globe" icon on the keyboard to toggle between them. Mine is set for American English (QWERTY) with small buttons showing letters a-z and numerals 0-9 on one screen or large buttons with the alphabet and numbers spread across three screens. I pull off and stop anytime I need to enter text anyway, so taking off a glove to use one screen is usually easier than flipping screens to get to all the keys. I keep the big key option just in case it's too cold to take off a glove.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by cadmanpilot View Post
    Just in case anyone is about to purchase a Navigator VI


    Paul
    Thank you, Paul. I just ordered one!

  5. #35
    I realize you would lose some functions, such as the Wonder Wheel, but will a Garmin Model at least mount in the Nav VI cradle?

  6. #36
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OGOBRacing View Post
    I realize you would lose some functions, such as the Wonder Wheel, but will a Garmin Model at least mount in the Nav VI cradle?
    I believe the Garmin 660 will mount in the cradle. My buddy had a K1600GT and did not want to spend the $$ for a Nav and used his 660 in the cradle. However, when he traded it for a 2016 GSA he went for the Nav.
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2018 R1200GS - Light White !
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

  7. #37

    20% off Navigator VI

    Thanks! I finally did it after several years of wondering...

  8. #38
    Registered User stooie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsinnc View Post
    I believe the Garmin 660 will mount in the cradle. My buddy had a K1600GT and did not want to spend the $$ for a Nav and used his 660 in the cradle. However, when he traded it for a 2016 GSA he went for the Nav.
    Yup, my 660 does indeed fit in the cradle and accept power from the mount. This was highly useful when I took an RT for a test ride in an unfamiliar area. It does not gather the data from the bike the way the Nav 6 does nor respond to zoom in/out commands from the wonderwheel.

    My own decision to buy the Nav VI was based on:

    1. Life is short.
    2. I liked the additional capability it has.
    3. I could afford it.

    I like it but would never argue it's the most cost-effective navigation solution. Then again, those are the three reasons I used when I decided to trade in my perfectly capable FJR for the delightful but not particularly cost-effective RT.

    Ride long and prosper!
    Bob Stewart
    Salem, OR

    2018 RT

  9. #39
    Dress for fall & avoid it AlanColes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vark View Post
    Why would someone by a bmw gps nav system when they can get one from any number of other vendors (eg Garmin, Tom Tom, etc) or use their smartphone?

    Donít take this question as critical of the bmw system. I am genuinely curious if thereís an advantage to using the bmw navigator?
    Vark, you've asked a good question and gotten some good reasons for and against paying the money for a Nav-VI, but I feel many of those miss some very real points that should be considered.

    The BMW Navigator VI (made by Garmin for BMW), should not be compared to the Garmin automobile GPS units that others have referred to (the ones where people say you can get a Garmin GPS for 1/5th to 1/3rd the price of a Nav-VI. These are not the same or similar products.

    Garmin does make products that are similar to the Nav-VI, such as their Zummo 660/665 etc. These are "motorcycle" GPS units and they cost approximately the same new as a new Nav-VI (but have smaller screens than the Nav-VI). Why are they a similar price? Because of what they are. Garmin also make units for Marine and Aviation applications.

    Garmin pricing for New GPS units by application:
    Automotive GPS - $130 to $300
    Motorcycle GPS - $400 to $700
    Marine GPS - $300 to $3,000+
    Aviation GPS - $5,000 to $15,000+

    The first two things one must remember when looking at the pricing above are:
    A) Garmin doesn't have a monopoly on the market, they are competing with many other manufacturers
    B) Garmin is very successful in these markets
    What I'm trying to show is that the pricing of these units reflects (in most segments) strong competitive pricing, not a monopoly or unique special market pricing.

    Each segment has different requirements. A true motorcycle GPS will typically have at the bare minimum:
    • glove-friendly touchscreen
    • readable display in sunlight
    • Resistant to fuel spills, UV rays
    • IPX7 water-rating
    • 2-way Bluetooth technology for hands-free calling, comms systems, music, etc.


    Here's a good, impartial, expert review of the Nav-VI. Dan Townsley is one of the true experts on Navigation and a No BS guy http://www.globeriders.com/article_p...e11_nav6.shtml
    No need to try and recreate the work others like Dan have done in outlining the benefits and pitfalls of the Nav-VI. Read Dan's review.

    I own a boat GPS, a Nav-VI, 2 Garmin Automotive GPS units, and have 3 cars with OE GPS units. I've been using GPS units since they were in their infancy and in quite good depth often running 2-3 GPS units side-by-side to identify strengths and weaknesses including SmartPhone GPS Apps (both Paid and Free). I do a lot of driving and riding and use GPS units very frequently. In the past twelve months, I've used GPS units in approximately 8 different countries (approximately 3,000 miles), 5 provinces and 15 or16 states.

    I have yet to find a SmartPhone based GPS that gives me what I want and is quick enough and stable enough to be practical for anything other than short-trip applications. Anything past that and I employ the application appropriate GPS. To coin an old phrase I have GPS units that are "Jacks of all trades" and others that are specialists. There are real differences that often are not readily apparent to the casual user or to someone just wanting to use the basic features, but once you get to in-depth navigation, especially multi-day trips, you start to appreciate the value of a Specialist GPS.

    I have a 2019 Bullitt Mustang that has a built-in OE GPS, plus Google Maps and Waze. I use all three and can tell you that I've not found one that is best at everything. I would not give up the Ford OE GPS for Waze or Google Maps. If you use them enough you'll likely come to the same conclusion, but perhaps not, each of us has different takes on things and that's okay.
    Regards, Alan - President BMWONS - BMWMOA/BMWRA/BMWONS/Airheads
    Current: 2019 R1250RT / '06 Ducati ST3s / '91 R100GS / '86 R80RT / '75 R90S / '73 850 & '70 750 Commando Prev: '14 R1200RT / '04 R1150RT / '81 Honda GL1100 / '77 Suzuki GS750 / '73 Norton 850 Commando

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanColes View Post
    Anything past that and I employ the application appropriate GPS. To coin an old phrase I have GPS units that are "Jacks of all trades" and others that are specialists. There are real differences that often are not readily apparent to the casual user or to someone just wanting to use the basic features, but once you get to in-depth navigation, especially multi-day trips, you start to appreciate the value of a Specialist GPS.

    I will agree that if you like all the integration with the motorcycle, bluetooth for music/phone connection the the Nav VI is a good GPS.

    As far as the "casual user", use a GPS everyday, I drive 40,000 miles a year and I find a simple off the shelf Garmin suits me just fine. I don't even use all the options my cheap Garmin offers. All I want in a GPS is how far to the next town and how to get there.
    Years ago when I bought my first GPS I bought into all the extras and spent the time to get everything to work through Bluetooth and I found I never used it. I don't even use voice instructions.
    As for multi day trips I go on a couple one or two week trips a year.
    I have fooled around with my Nav VI on my RT and I see what it does, but don't really see the need.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  11. #41
    Dress for fall & avoid it AlanColes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorUB View Post
    I will agree that if you like all the integration with the motorcycle, bluetooth for music/phone connection the the Nav VI is a good GPS.

    As far as the "casual user", use a GPS everyday, I drive 40,000 miles a year and I find a simple off the shelf Garmin suits me just fine. I don't even use all the options my cheap Garmin offers. All I want in a GPS is how far to the next town and how to get there.
    Years ago when I bought my first GPS I bought into all the extras and spent the time to get everything to work through Bluetooth and I found I never used it. I don't even use voice instructions.
    As for multi day trips I go on a couple one or two week trips a year.
    I have fooled around with my Nav VI on my RT and I see what it does, but don't really see the need.
    Those are all valid points and highlight that we all have different likes/dislikes, wants/needs, etc.

    To me PoorUB, I'd think you were much more in the "someone just wanting to use the basic features" category than the "casual user" area.

    I use a Garmin Drive 50LMT and an older Nuvi-58 for when I'm using rental cars etc., and they work fine. As has been said, they're about 25%-33% the cost of the Nav-VI and do a ton of stuff (most of what the Nav-VI does except integration, etc.).

    I worked my way up on the motorcycle GPS side of things from an old Garmin StreetPilot 2730 that was bought in 2006 to a Zumo 390, Nav-V, and now the Nav-VI. I've sold my previous units as I upgraded so that the actual net purchase price wasn't much more than buying a new high-end automotive GPS.

    For me, I use my bike in all weather including long days in heavy rain, frost to slight snow, etc. I used an automotive GPS on a bike years ago but had it fail after a day of heavy rain. After that, I've always gone with a GPS with a good IPX rating so I don't lose another to rain. I have since lost a Motorola VHF radio to rain (supposedly waterproof) while my Garmin motorcycle-specific GPS with an IPX7 rating continued to work without issue. Like I say, we each want slightly to widely different things from our gear and it is great that we have so much more choice now.
    Regards, Alan - President BMWONS - BMWMOA/BMWRA/BMWONS/Airheads
    Current: 2019 R1250RT / '06 Ducati ST3s / '91 R100GS / '86 R80RT / '75 R90S / '73 850 & '70 750 Commando Prev: '14 R1200RT / '04 R1150RT / '81 Honda GL1100 / '77 Suzuki GS750 / '73 Norton 850 Commando

  12. #42
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    I have ridden in heavy rain and will pull a baggie over the GPS, or just toss it in the top case as with rain on my glasses and the face shield I can't see squat anyway, at least fine detail.

    I know there are riders that want the Bluetooth to mate with headsets and so on, so it is probably the way to go for them.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  13. #43
    Dress for fall & avoid it AlanColes's Avatar
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    Same with me, my vision is weak for detail (unfortunately even when visibility is great).
    When the weather is bad and overall visibility is at its worst, and I'm trying to navigate in an unfamiliar area at night, in the rain, I feel that motorcyclists are at there most vulnerable. That is when my motorcycle-specific GPS earns its premium pricing. A very small price for me to pay to be at my safest that I can be when the risks to my wellbeing are at their highest.
    That is absolutely not the time to be reducing one's chances of being safe.
    Many riders will never ride in those conditions or have the luxury of being able to adjust their schedules so they don't have the same needs/wants as I do.
    In June I did 10k on 2-wheels through just about the entire Appalachians as well as the Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia and the Cascade Mountains in Washington State. If I'd hadn't been able to ride in heavy downpours with good, visible GPS, I wouldn't have been able to do those rides and meet my work obligations.
    Don't know how many years of riding I've got left so I'm trying to make sure I maximize what I have now. ;-)

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    Regards, Alan - President BMWONS - BMWMOA/BMWRA/BMWONS/Airheads
    Current: 2019 R1250RT / '06 Ducati ST3s / '91 R100GS / '86 R80RT / '75 R90S / '73 850 & '70 750 Commando Prev: '14 R1200RT / '04 R1150RT / '81 Honda GL1100 / '77 Suzuki GS750 / '73 Norton 850 Commando

  14. #44
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanColes View Post
    Same with me, my vision is weak for detail (unfortunately even when visibility is great).
    When the weather is bad and overall visibility is at its worst, and I'm trying to navigate in an unfamiliar area at night, in the rain, I feel that motorcyclists are at there most vulnerable. That is when my motorcycle-specific GPS earns its premium pricing. A very small price for me to pay to be at my safest that I can be when the risks to my wellbeing are at their highest.
    That is absolutely not the time to be reducing one's chances of being safe.
    Many riders will never ride in those conditions or have the luxury of being able to adjust their schedules so they don't have the same needs/wants as I do.
    In June I did 10k on 2-wheels through just about the entire Appalachians as well as the Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia and the Cascade Mountains in Washington State. If I'd hadn't been able to ride in heavy downpours with good, visible GPS, I wouldn't have been able to do those rides and meet my work obligations.
    Don't know how many years of riding I've got left so I'm trying to make sure I maximize what I have now. ;-)

    Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
    Could not agree more. My first GPS was a TomTom One that I used on my 1150GS. It worked fine but was not waterproof so I did the baggie thing. I soon came to the same conclusion as you .... in rain or even heavy rain is when I need my waterproof GPS the most and trying to see the screen through a baggie was just adding more risk than I wanted to take. That was when I bought my first motorcycle GPS a Zumo 450. Worked great until i moved up to a Nav and was able to sell the 450 for a decent price.
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2018 R1200GS - Light White !
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

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