Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 137

Thread: R18 and R18 /2

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by madlad View Post
    The bike will supposedly start under 20K, be in hand 2 quarter of 2020 as a 2021 model (probably September), have a ton of customizable options from the factory and dealers are taking deposits. I can’t wait for it and have a deposit on one.
    The r18 or 18/2? What was the price and what did you put down on it if you don't mind. I'm interested in either if it's under 20K myself,

    thanks
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  2. #32
    Registered User madlad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    The r18 or 18/2? What was the price and what did you put down on it if you don't mind. I'm interested in either if it's under 20K myself,

    thanks
    Neither, the production model hasn’t been sussed out yet. I placed a 500 deposit on one.

  3. #33
    Thanks madlad
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  4. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    204

    R18 and R18 /2

    BMW Motorrad presents the “Big Boxer” of the R 18.

    The most powerful BMW boxer engine of all time with historical roots and full torque.

    Munich. Motorcycling in its most authentic form: instinct over mind, technology not for its own sake but as a way of creating space for fantasy and powerful emotion rather than sober contemplation and objective calculation. This was the message that accompanied the debut of the BMW Motorrad Concept R 18 at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in May 2019 – a striking revival of the BMW Motorrad brand core, namely the boxer engine.

    More than any other present-day BMW motorcycles before it, the Concept R 18 translated the essence of famous BMW Motorrad classics into the modern era, in particular in terms of form, while at the same time providing a glimpse ahead to a volume-production motorcycle that would enrich the BMW Motorrad Heritage world of experience in the near future: the BMW R 18.

    The highest-capacity 2-cylinder boxer engine of all time.
    The heart of the new BMW R 18 is a completely newly developed 2-cylinder boxer engine – the “Big Boxer” – which has played a key role not just in the two BMW Motorrad prototypes – the Concept R 18 and the Concept R 18 /2 – but also in the custom bikes supported by BMW Motorrad, namely “The Departed” by ZON and “Birdcage” by Revival Cycles. BMW Motorrad now presents this new, highly distinctive engine in detail.

    Not only in terms of its impressive outward appearance, but also from a technical point of view, the new “Big Boxer” ties in with the traditional boxer engines that were synonymous with motorcycles from Munich and Berlin-Spandau for around 70 years, from the beginning of BMW Motorrad production in 1923 through to the appearance of the air/oil-cooled successor: these were engines with a clear design, created for optimum reliability and ease of maintenance, featuring logically arranged yet powerful technology.

    With its OHV valve drive along with a separate engine and transmission housing, the new “Big Boxer” has the same structural features that distinguished the very first BMW Motorrad boxer engine, which at that time had laterally controlled valves. The highest-capacity twin-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production is a 1 802 cc engine, resulting from a 107.1 mm bore and
    100 mm stroke. The engine output is 67 kW (91 hp) at 4 750 rpm. The maximum torque of 158 Nm is already available at 3 000 rpm. More than 150 Nm is now available from 2 000 to 4 000 rpm. This ensures enormous pulling power and – in conjunction with a generously sized flywheel mass – exemplary running smoothness as well. These are the benefits of this level of performance and torque during riding. The maximum engine speed is 5 750 rpm, while the idling speed is 950 rpm.

    Air/oil cooling, vertically split engine housing and triple plain bearing crankcase.
    The new “Big Boxer” is air/oil cooled, has large ribbed cylinders and cylinder heads and weighs 110.8 kg including gearbox and intake system. It has a vertically split aluminium engine housing.

    Unlike the classic air-cooled 2-valve boxer engines made by BMW Motorrad, however, the “Big Boxer” crankshaft, forged from quenched and tempered steel, has an additional main bearing at the centre, which was necessary due to the enormous cylinder volume in order to prevent undesirable bending vibrations of the crankshaft.

    Like the crankshaft, the two connecting rods with I-shaft are mounted on plain bearings and are likewise forged from quenched and tempered steel. They accommodate cast aluminium pistons with two compression rings and an oil wiper ring. The running surface of the light metal cylinders is coated with NiCaSil.

    Lubricating and cooling oil is supplied by a wet sump lubrication system with a two-stage oil pump via sleeve-type chain driven by the crankshaft.

    Classic OHV valve drive with two camshafts as in the legendary R 5 to R 51/2 combined with modern 4-valve technology and dual ignition.
    Although the new “Big Boxer” has four valves, dual ignition, a modern combustion chamber architecture, intake manifold injection and the BMS-O engine management system for the best possible torque as well as optimum consumption and emissions, it uses the classic OHV configuration for its valve drive – as was the practice pursued by BMW Motorrad over a period of some 70 years.

    When developing the valve drive for the “Big Boxer”, BMW Motorrad engineers were inspired by a very special engine design in the history of BMW Motorrad – in keeping with the Heritage concept: the 2-cylinder boxer engine of the R 5/R 51 (1936 – 1941) and R 51/2 (1950 – 1951), the latter having been the first BMW motorcycle with a boxer engine after the Second World War. In contrast to other OHV designs by BMW Motorrad, this engine – highly valued by connoisseurs – has two camshafts driven by the crankshaft via a sleeve-type chain.

    As in the historical role model, the two camshafts are also positioned to the left and right above the crankshaft in the “Big Boxer”. The advantage of this “twin camshaft boxer” is the shorter pushrods. This also makes for reduced moving masses, minimised deflections and lower linear expansions. A generally stiffer valve drive with improved control precision and higher speed stability is the consequence of this more elaborate construction.

    Fork rocker arm and manually adjustable valve clearance compensation via adjusting screws as in the traditional BMW boxer role model.
    In the traditional BMW Motorrad boxer design, the two pushrods actuate one pushrod per cylinder side for the intake and one for the exhaust side, guided in a sealed pushrod tube on the top of the cylinders. The two intake and exhaust valves in the cylinder head are actuated in pairs via fork toggle levers.

    In contrast to today's widespread engine technology, valve clearance compensation is not effected by means of hydraulic elements, but – as was the case in most classic air-cooled BMW two-valve boxers for decades – via one adjusting screw with one lock nut for each valve. As was formerly the case in the classic 2-valve boxers, valve clearance adjustment (0.2 – 0.3 mm) in the R18 “Big Boxer” is also achieved very quickly. The valves are made of steel, with a disc diameter of 41.2 mm on the inlet side and 35 mm on the outlet side. The valve angle is 21 degrees on the inlet side and 24 degrees on the outlet side.

    Constant mesh 6-speed transmission and self-reinforcing single-plate dry clutch with anti-hopping function.
    As in most BMW Motorrad boxer engines for decades (with the exception of vertical-flow, air/water-cooled boxers since 2012), a single-disc dry clutch transmits the torque generated by the engine to the transmission. For the first time it is designed as a self-reinforcing anti-hopping clutch, thereby eliminating unwanted stamping of the rear wheel caused by engine drag torque in the event of hard downshifting.

    The constant mesh 6-speed transmission is located in a dual-section aluminium housing and is designed as a 4-shaft transmission with helical gear pairs. The gearbox input shaft with lug dampers drives the two gearbox shafts with the gear wheel pairs. An output shaft is provided to bridge the distance and reverse the direction of rotation. A reverse gear is available as an optional extra. This is driven by an intermediate gear and an electric motor and can be shifted manually.

    Open secondary drive based on the classic role model.
    As in all BMW motorcycles with boxer engines, torque is transmitted from the gearbox to the rear wheel in the R 18 via a propeller-shaft or universal-shaft drive with universal joint, shaft and rear-axle drive with bevel and ring gear. The propeller shaft and universal joint are examples of fascinating classic motorcycle technology since they are nickel-plated and open, as was commonly the case in BMW Motorrad models up to and including model year 1955. A so-called tripoid joint is applied on the gearbox side for the purpose of length compensation.

    The above was from Rideapart.com via BMWLT.com

  5. #35
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,599
    Next time , just provide a link to the article.

  6. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    45

    Not for me, but I'm excited

    I just stumbled across the R18 production announcement a couple of days ago. I think it is big news! We all know that Motorrad division is climbing in sales and this is a good time to make an attempt at market share. Go after Cruisers.
    At some angles it looks gorgeous to me, at other angles the engine looks bulging/out of proportion. Some people like that? Cruiser riders want the engine out there and looking shiny? It looks very smooth, enclosed, shiny- but big. (talk about flying toasters!)
    Easily customizable, overall.
    R18 looks better than R18/2, but the /2 obviously looks more modern and more production ready.
    Change Harley riders? Don't think so. Take away market share from Victory/Polaris/Indian/Metric Cruisers? Good chance.
    Price? Way over 20k. Don't believe the hype.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by greenmachine1100 View Post
    R18 looks better than R18/2, but the /2 obviously looks more modern and more production ready.
    Change Harley riders? Don't think so. Take away market share from Victory/Polaris/Indian/Metric Cruisers? Good chance.
    Well, just to note, the last time I looked Harley Davidson outsold BMW Motorrad 20 to 1. That means that if BMW could capture a mere 5% of HD sales BMW sales would double. If BMW could capture a tiny 1% of HD sales BMW sales would increase 20 percent. A worth goal no doubt.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Well, just to note, the last time I looked Harley Davidson outsold BMW Motorrad 20 to 1. That means that if BMW could capture a mere 5% of HD sales BMW sales would double. If BMW could capture a tiny 1% of HD sales BMW sales would increase 20 percent. A worth goal no doubt.
    https://www.downtownmesa.com/motorcyclesonmain/ "Motorcycles on Main", first Friday night of each month [ except the summer high heat months ].

    I might see 3-4 BMW models [ including mine ] in 3 blocks of bikes lining both sides of the street. A few jap bikes interspersed but at least 95% of the bikes there are Harley's.

    BMW wishes they could sell their products like HD does. 20 to 1 would mean there would have to be about 150 Beemers to the 3K+ Harleys on site each month. Not even close.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    https://www.downtownmesa.com/motorcyclesonmain/ "Motorcycles on Main", first Friday night of each month [ except the summer high heat months ].

    I might see 3-4 BMW models [ including mine ] in 3 blocks of bikes lining both sides of the street. A few jap bikes interspersed but at least 95% of the bikes there are Harley's.

    BMW wishes they could sell their products like HD does. 20 to 1 would mean there would have to be about 150 Beemers to the 3K+ Harleys on site each month. Not even close.
    Backing the bike to the curb and posing with it is not exactly a mainstream activity for most BMW riders, while the same cannot be said for HD riders. So peruse the historical participation and placing in the Biennial Iron Butt Rally for example and you do find a different perspective on participation.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  10. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    45

    Love the numbers!

    Here's one I caught in passing on a website, so who knows how super reliable they are:

    HD sells 250+ thousand per year in U.S. (dropping 1% each of last 9 years?) Maybe, double that world wide?
    Honda sells 300+ thousand per year in U.S. (plus another 100k off-road motocross?), BUT 19 MILLION WORLDWIDE.
    BMW sells about 25k per year?
    Guess it is safe to say that 'it is relative', and depends on what your goals are. haha! That 1% puts things in perspective!
    I really want BMW to keep rolling on sales, it opens up a world of possibilities. The R18 cruiser is bold.

    Which touches on the problem of Honda being so conservative, and the significance of the U.S. market. HD has to be conservative, they have white knuckles on the traditional crowd. Honda could fly new models and experiment with American market, and still have WW sales support the endeavor. Hell, they could sell GoldWings at cost and might run out of money in year 2120. haha! Just crush on market share.

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Backing the bike to the curb and posing with it is not exactly a mainstream activity for most BMW riders, while the same cannot be said for HD riders. So peruse the historical participation and placing in the Biennial Iron Butt Rally for example and you do find a different perspective on participation.
    Not many Harley do Iron Butt mileage requirements. Until I moved to Az. I made every Laconia, NH bike week since 1972. I was born there and still had relatives I could stay with, so it was a no brainer to travel to from just south of that states borders. 90% Harley attendance out of 400K bikes that week. That's a guess but it's close.

    The last MOA national rally had what? 6K in attendance from all over the US? Laconia draws people from all over the country and Europe that week. Daytona, nearly identical percentage of Harleys.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Not many Harley do Iron Butt mileage requirements. Until I moved to Az. I made every Laconia, NH bike week since 1972. I was born there and still had relatives I could stay with, so it was a no brainer to travel to from just south of that states borders. 90% Harley attendance out of 400K bikes that week. That's a guess but it's close.

    The last MOA national rally had what? 6K in attendance from all over the US? Laconia draws people from all over the country and Europe that week. Daytona, nearly identical percentage of Harleys.
    Having been to Daytona a couple of times and Sturgis a couple of times I agree that these events draw HD riders in numbers unmatched by any other brand. And some of the venues draw real mainstream bands from yesteryear. I stand by my once earlier observation that either of these events constitute the world's largest costume party. Here in the Big Bend we get bands of pirates bleating their loud pipes way in large numbers. When I can hear them departing past my house, two or three miles away it is almost ridiculous. It used to be three bikes: one for the tools, one for the parts, and one for the beer. Now they seem to run in packs of 8 to 12 with a couple of sag wagons full of the "old ladies" tagging along behind. It would be comical if it wasn't so sad.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Having been to Daytona a couple of times and Sturgis a couple of times I agree that these events draw HD riders in numbers unmatched by any other brand. And some of the venues draw real mainstream bands from yesteryear. I stand by my once earlier observation that either of these events constitute the world's largest costume party. Here in the Big Bend we get bands of pirates bleating their loud pipes way in large numbers. When I can hear them departing past my house, two or three miles away it is almost ridiculous. It used to be three bikes: one for the tools, one for the parts, and one for the beer. Now they seem to run in packs of 8 to 12 with a couple of sag wagons full of the "old ladies" tagging along behind. It would be comical if it wasn't so sad.
    I'd enjoy seeing more Beemer riders attend these week long events like Sturgis and Laconia myself.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  14. #44
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,599
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    I made every Laconia, NH bike week since 1972. 90% Harley attendance out of 400K bikes that week. That's a guess but it's close. Laconia draws people from all over the country and Europe that week. Daytona, nearly identical percentage of Harleys.
    I've been to Laconia and Daytona about 10 times and I can't say I met a lot of people from Europe at either venue. No matter - the draw isn't the races at either Laconia or Daytona. The draw is exactly as Mr. Glaves has indicated - posing. And that's an entirely different demographic from your typical BMW owner/rider. Not saying one is better or worse than the other; simply an understanding of fact. As far as attending Sturgis or Laconia, I've done Sturgis once and that was one time too many. It has nothing to do with motorcycling and anyone who says it does is either lying or deluded.

    Now, if introduction of the R18 can increase market share for BMW, good on 'em.

  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    I've been to Laconia and Daytona about 10 times and I can't say I met a lot of people from Europe at either venue. No matter - the draw isn't the races at either Laconia or Daytona. The draw is exactly as Mr. Glaves has indicated - posing. And that's an entirely different demographic from your typical BMW owner/rider. Not saying one is better or worse than the other; simply an understanding of fact. As far as attending Sturgis or Laconia, I've done Sturgis once and that was one time too many. It has nothing to do with motorcycling and anyone who says it does is either lying or deluded.

    Now, if introduction of the R18 can increase market share for BMW, good on 'em.
    I always believed it was the comraderie [ sp ] of the Harley riders myself. With 400K attendance, and enough space on the boardwalk for perhaps 3K bikes at any one time, most are riding to scenic areas like Mt. Washington runs, and loops around both winnipesaukee and winnisquam. Few spend their time parked at Weirs beach.

    Though I agree that anything Beemer can do to increase sales, get more people riding Beemers than other makes, the better for the rest of us. Perhaps if they increased sales by double or triple present numbers, we'd see more of them at events like Daytona and Laconia. My first introduction to bike week in Laconia, I was 8, sitting on my grandmothers lap in her T brid. But from 71 till 05 [ 48 years ] I made the event [ it's fathers day weekend ]. Never spent much time at Weirs other than to make the run from one end to the other, them head for the scenic areas of the white mountains. Many of those years I was riding HD dressers myself.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •