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Thread: Calculating minimum turning radius

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Is this a legit question? Why in the name of all things holy would you even care...?
    Of course it's a legit question. Top competitors ride certain bikes due to rake, wheelbase. If wheelbase matters relative turning radius' then the next logical question is what the numbers look like.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  2. #17
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Go out to a parking lot, put the bike in neutral, and stand it upright. Move the bars to full lock and walk the bike thru a 180 degree turn. Measure the diameter. The "real" practical answer is going to be somewhere between what you measured and two parking spaces.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
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    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #18
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    When we were preparing to go riding in Southern Africa Voni and I both practiced doing U turns to the right and to the left until we could do them within the width of two parking places. Why? So we were sure we could do a right-hand U turn on a typical paved roadway with traffic riding/driving in the left and not right lanes. Preparing with these kinds of skills has the ability to save a persons life in a pinch.
    It's also critical for those folks that ride in side-by-side herd formation. If the rider on the right, doesn't make the low speed right-hand turn within a very small radius, the whole herd can go down.
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  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Go out to a parking lot, put the bike in neutral, and stand it upright. Move the bars to full lock and walk the bike thru a 180 degree turn. Measure the diameter. The "real" practical answer is going to be somewhere between what you measured and two parking spaces.
    Like this guy. Upright, it appears his GS turns in something around 15 feet [ two car slots are 18 feet ]. When he leans the bike, looks like he's scrubbing another 2+ feet off that diameter for something around 12-13 feet in diameter.

    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  5. #20
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    It's also critical for those folks that ride in side-by-side herd formation. If the rider on the right, doesn't make the low speed right-hand turn within a very small radius, the whole herd can go down.
    Deservedly so.

  6. #21
    '99 '03 '06 National Co-Rally Chair Friedle's Avatar
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    You might consider contacting your state MSF office to see if they offer a UBBC (Ultimate Bike Bonding Course) anywhere in the state or nearby states. This is a course that concentrates on slow speed handling skills. It can be taken on any street bike, and is basically an introductory level motor officer skills course.

    The absolute minimum turning radius is not as important as the minimum turning radius YOU can accomplish on YOUR bike in a repeatable manner, without having to resort to the HD shuffle.

    Better riding thru training, not math.

    Friedle
    MSF 27713
    Ride fast safely

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Friedle View Post
    You might consider contacting your state MSF office to see if they offer a UBBC (Ultimate Bike Bonding Course) anywhere in the state or nearby states. This is a course that concentrates on slow speed handling skills. It can be taken on any street bike, and is basically an introductory level motor officer skills course.

    The absolute minimum turning radius is not as important as the minimum turning radius YOU can accomplish on YOUR bike in a repeatable manner, without having to resort to the HD shuffle.

    Better riding thru training, not math.

    Friedle
    MSF 27713
    I've got two police courses behind me, the training is there. The absolute minimum turning radius is a reference point for where you are in relation to what the bike is capable of physically. No more or less.

    Wheelbase will affect numbers, thus the question asked about how to determine turning radius potential, based on wheelbase. Each bike model/make will be different.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Like this guy. Upright, it appears his GS turns in something around 15 feet [ two car slots are 18 feet ]. When he leans the bike, looks like he's scrubbing another 2+ feet off that diameter for something around 12-13 feet in diameter.

    Thanks for the youtube video...it is simple, straight forward, good info.
    Gail Thorne
    2017 F700GS

  9. #24
    '99 '03 '06 National Co-Rally Chair Friedle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    I've got two police courses behind me, the training is there. The absolute minimum turning radius is a reference point for where you are in relation to what the bike is capable of physically. No more or less.

    Wheelbase will affect numbers, thus the question asked about how to determine turning radius potential, based on wheelbase. Each bike model/make will be different.
    If you already have the training, then just go ride and figure it out. The machine will have a large part in the determination. I can turn tighter circles on a Grom than a chopper. I still maintain that the important point is how tight can you comfortably circle your bike as opposed to that the calculator might determine.

    Friedle
    Ride fast safely

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Friedle View Post
    If you already have the training, then just go ride and figure it out. The machine will have a large part in the determination. I can turn tighter circles on a Grom than a chopper. I still maintain that the important point is how tight can you comfortably circle your bike as opposed to that the calculator might determine.

    Friedle
    My skills compared to what the bike is capable of producing mechanically gives insight where one sits on slow speed turns. I prefer to have a base to work from, what's the minimum turning radius any particular bike is capable of and comparing that to present skills levels.

    Bolded, and that's exactly what I'm trying to determine with this thread.

    I can turn tighter circles on a Grom than a chopper

    But do you know their minimum turning radius' based on wheelbase so you could compare mechanical limitations vs your current riding skills?
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  11. #26
    Unless I totally missed the point of the video, I stand by my earlier post #3. The minimum radius is achieved when the rider is capable of leaning and balancing the bike - way leaned over and still not lying on the ground. It isn't the full lock radius with the bike upright. I suppose it is possible for a couple of folks to roll a bike around with a lean of some prescribed angle, but what that angle needs to be which can still be achieved by a mounted rider at an achievable slow speed is hard to guess.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Unless I totally missed the point of the video, I stand by my earlier post #3. The minimum radius is achieved when the rider is capable of leaning and balancing the bike - way leaned over and still not lying on the ground. It isn't the full lock radius with the bike upright. I suppose it is possible for a couple of folks to roll a bike around with a lean of some prescribed angle, but what that angle needs to be which can still be achieved by a mounted rider at an achievable slow speed is hard to guess.
    Interesting video on lean angles

    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Is this a legit question? Why in the name of all things holy would you even care...?

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by rhodetrip View Post
    What I'm getting here from some is that because I asked a question no one seems to be able to answer, it must be a dumb question. Does it freakin matter the motive for asking the question?
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    What I'm getting here from some is that because I asked a question no one seems to be able to answer, it must be a dumb question. Does it freakin matter the motive for asking the question?
    It doesn't really matter. But, since the answer is quite subjective, knowing why the information was wanted might help somebody formulate a useful answer. Just guessing.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

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