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Thread: Lethal memory fail: why drivers see, and then forget motorcyclists

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    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Lethal memory fail: why drivers see, and then forget motorcyclists

    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

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    Rocky Bow BMW Riders #197 bogthebasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    Interesting that one recommendation to improve short term memory retention of what one sees would be to say 'bike' after one sees one in order to have more memory pathways to the event. It would be great to do another set of these tests to prove whether this does work in reality.
    Ken Dittrick
    2008 R1200RT (Biarritz Blau)


    Excuses are the rocks upon which our dreams are crushed - Tim Fargo

  3. #3
    I think they see you, but don't think much of it.... the average driver doesn't have any sense of situational awareness, to them a bump is a inconvenience but that's about it, and it's never their fault.

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    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    I think the article is saying that there is more to it than that. What I understand their point to be is that there is a human characteristic that is at work in many “I didn’t see him” accidents. I don’t know if it is true or not but I do not discount it, nor do I think it cannot be overcome with training and commitment. I am pessimistic about the prospects of our society ever having the training and commitment needed to create drivers who can overcome the natural tendency to look but not observe.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  5. #5
    Rocky Bow BMW Riders #197 bogthebasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I think the article is saying that there is more to it than that. What I understand their point to be is that there is a human characteristic that is at work in many “I didn’t see him” accidents. I don’t know if it is true or not but I do not discount it, nor do I think it cannot be overcome with training and commitment. I am pessimistic about the prospects of our society ever having the training and commitment needed to create drivers who can overcome the natural tendency to look but not observe.
    I agree. The habits of most people tend to slip over time even with some amount of personal training and effort. Also it is hard and tiring to constantly look, observe, take note of what we see (motorcycle, VStrom, red) and commit it to memory. It is a part of why many (if not most) motorcyclists report that riding is very tiring - it is not all about the physical effort of it; it is also the mental alertness that must be quite high. All. The. Time. In reality, the same should be true about people in their cars - but seems less so much of the time.
    Ken Dittrick
    2008 R1200RT (Biarritz Blau)


    Excuses are the rocks upon which our dreams are crushed - Tim Fargo

  6. #6

    Best way to show this instead of say it....


  7. #7
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Seems to roll along with the fact an “eyewitness” account of an incident can be really flawed.......by a number of factors.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I think the article is saying that there is more to it than that. What I understand their point to be is that there is a human characteristic that is at work in many “I didn’t see him” accidents. I don’t know if it is true or not but I do not discount it, nor do I think it cannot be overcome with training and commitment. I am pessimistic about the prospects of our society ever having the training and commitment needed to create drivers who can overcome the natural tendency to look but not observe.
    I was trained from an early age by my father to always look at least twice (started driving on the farm at age 12). Over my 50 years of driving, it's amazing how many times that second look has picked up on something I didn't "see" the first time. I think if everyone was trained that way, it could have a very positive effect on driver safety (and motorcycle safety).
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

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    Registered User REDC650GT's Avatar
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    Sorry Mate I didn't see ya

    The SMIDSY maneuver as I approach any intersection, cut out or left turn lane (when vehicles are preparing to turn) to me is the antidote to making sure I am seen. I can't count the number of times I have done this and get a response from the other vehicle usually locking the brakes suddenly. Eye contact, front tires moving on the suspect vehicle, brakes always covered, having an out etc are always needed in these situations. Situational Awareness and Dynamic assessment with actions listed to help me navigate the Zombie Apocalypse. One of the best items posted here was the video below.



    Chris

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    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by REDC650GT View Post
    The SMIDSY maneuver as I approach any intersection, cut out or left turn lane (when vehicles are preparing to turn) to me is the antidote to making sure I am seen. Chris
    I've doing this for years. With two auxiliary driving lights on my R1100 and two auxiliary and plus two fog lights on my K (as well as headlights on high beam on both bikes), I believe this manouever and the additional lights makes me more visible and possibly not in control and therefore something to be avoided. I enter the intersections with the bike stable and give either a nod or a quick wave as thanks for not pulling out in front of me.

    So far the Helite vest has not been inflated.
    Paul F. Ruffell
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Niagara Riders & Knights of the Roundel #333

  11. #11

    lethal memory fail

    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    It would not take much time to wire drivers to electrodes and measure brain patterns.

  12. #12
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    I think another factor here is the danger of an approaching vehicle as assessed by the car driver. If they see a truck, car, bus, LEO approaching, they represent a potential danger to the driver. A single motorcycle doesn't so they don't take it into account or remember that it is there. In short, they cease to consider it or see it.
    Walter

    "Sometimes I wonder if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it." Mark Twain

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