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Thread: BMW's Too top heavy for older riders?

  1. #31
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    I like the F800GT. Wet weight, 470 lbs. Low center of gravity. Belt drive. A fairing big enough to offer protection, and not so large it is ponderous.
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  2. #32
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    I like the F800GT. Wet weight, 470 lbs. Low center of gravity. Belt drive. A fairing big enough to offer protection, and not so large it is ponderous.
    And, alas, no longer produced.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  3. #33
    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milesaway View Post
    You mention it hurting your back. One of the toughest adaptations I had to do due to back problems is learning to ONLY hold the bike up with my legs. The reflex is to pull the handlebars to stabilise - de training for this was key for me. Once I learned to only use my legs (and thighs) weight became a non issue. Hope I’m being helpful
    I dropped my RT at the rally in one of the training classes. Four key things to remember:

    1. Once it starts going over, unless you're the Hulk or remembered to eat your Wheaties that morning, all you can really do is set it down as gently as possible. Accept that it's going down and there's nothing you can do about it in most cases and you're less likely to hurt yourself by trying to do something you can't.
    2. Make sure to kill the engine immediately. Being keeled over messes with the oil supply to the head that's farthest from the ground and can pool in the lower one. This has to be your FIRST action after recovering your posture or you'll be buying many more expensive parts afterwards.
    3. Watch some videos about lifting dropped bikes. You have to keep your back and arms straight, your arms straight and parallel to your back, and lift with your legs. I'm almost 55, only 5'6" and about as far from being strong as you can get and still be able to walk. I picked up the RT like it was a five year old using the right technique. It was the first (and so far only) time I dropped this bike and I was amazed at how easy it was to pick up. I dropped my FJR 10 years ago (when I was just 44) and it seemed harder than the RT to get back up.
    4. Remember to lower the side stand BEFORE you lift it up. I didn't and luckily someone else there ran over and did it for me or I would have had to set it back down again (it fell to the right). That would have been REALLY embarrassing.
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    I like the F800GT. Wet weight, 470 lbs. Low center of gravity. Belt drive. A fairing big enough to offer protection, and not so large it is ponderous.
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    And, alas, no longer produced.
    But there's a lot of barely used models out there, previously loved by BMW owners.

    Mine had about 2000 miles on it when I found it. Enough that the 600 mile service was done. And the first owner was conscientious enough to do an annual service even though there weren't enough miles on it to do the first full service. Plus, he added about $3000 of accessories to it.

    MSRP was twice what you can find them for now.

    They are worth considering. After all, every one who buys a new BMW, feels their bike is worth buying for someone else. It's not like they are "trash" and worth nothing when we sell our BMWs.
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  5. #35
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    Yep, age is catching up with me. I've had a nice K100RT for over 25 years. My only real problem was my knees banging the back of the fairing edge. Other than that I liked the bike. Decided to sell it; realized that on the market, they bring no money to speak of. I was sitting around the house doing nothing. I went out to the garage and started removing the fairing. By noon the next day, I had a plain K100. I put the bike on the sidestand. Got on the bike and pulled it up. Man, it felt so good and light. Yea, now were talking. Put the bike on the center stand, and set in the seat. No knees banging a fairing. . I was smilin. Got on the internet, bought a couple of complete front end headlight assemblies and radiator surrounds. Can't wait to get this bike back togather; it'll be light and nimble to ride.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    And, alas, no longer produced.
    But we are still hoping for a replacement!
    GT, RS, R, or ST in a 800 to 900 size!

  7. #37
    got, got, got no time... rguy's Avatar
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    Low suspension models are worth considering as well. Surprisingly the G310GS is only available in one height - 32.9". It's a no go for me.
    Neal - '16 R1200GS / '81 R65
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUGENE View Post
    But we are still hoping for a replacement!
    GT, RS, R, or ST in a 800 to 900 size!
    I can understand your enthusiasm, Eugene. But that again means you only look at new models, and disregard a lot of good choices out there.

    Tell me Eugene...is there something wrong with your bike? Something that would make you would feel unethical to sell the bike to someone else? Probably not.

    I'm assuming you want to sell your GT some day, and that you're hoping someone will find it worth paying some money for it.

    And if only "new" BMWs are a worthwhile consideration...then you should give your BMW to Goodwill or Salvation Army. Another thought would be to put a cardboard sign on it saying, "Free to Good Home".


    All that is pretty far-fetched...but that's the logical conclusion to me of not considering previously owned and loved BMWs. And in that category of previously owned and loved BMWs are some that are lighter in weight and have lower CGs.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  9. #39
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    No not selling it! Love the LOW maintenance. Just like see new models and colors. Past owner of a 04 R1150R too.

  10. #40
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Perhaps the solution is not going to lighter rides, but rather it is to go to wider bikes. Five years ago I started pondering the wisdom of going lighter and lower. So, in the intervening years I bought a FJR, a Super Tenere and a R1200GSA (lowered). So far the GSA has been easy to ride and I do not feel my doom is imminent. I do recognize that the clock is running so my last purchase was wider (and slower, much slower). I got a Ural Gear Up with two wheel drive. What a hoot to ride..... think wider.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

  11. #41
    Registered User crna59's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stooie View Post
    Bruce:

    How much fuel and oil was in your S1000R when you weighed it? BMW lists the S1000R weight as 476 lb. The listed weight includes full fuel and oil. The weight of 5.2 gal of fuel and 4 quarts of oil is ~ 39 pounds which is close to the difference between what you measured and BMW's listed weight.

    None of which changes the fact that your S1000R is about 150 pounds lighter than my RT. Looks like you've got a fun ride!

    I just looked and the listed weight with full tank of gas is actually 205kg or 452lbs. I had less than a 1/2 tank, which would have been about ~16lbs.
    Bruce A. Brown #212072
    MSF 2-wheel Instructor
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  12. #42
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    What's missing in the lineup is a model I believe is definitely doable but no brand is currently doing it. What makes RTW such a phenomenal Sport Tourer is the fact it is very competent in everything from tight twisties on up to droning on an interstate. To earn top score for Sport & Tour you need excellent suspension, fabulous weather/wind management, very ample power, and the various comfort-related tech features that our beloved RTW's enjoy. The only area to improve for me at going on 67y/o now is very simply this: the SAME level of comfort & performance features my RT has, ALL OF THEM, but with a curb weight around 520lb tops. No compromises, so it might look like this:

    • 900-1000cc displacement, 115hp, smooth power plant with transverse crankshaft
    • Fully adjustable electrically controlled windscreen
    • Trimmed fairing, lighter/simpler panniers
    • belt drive w/ 50K mile change interval (much lighter, more efficient, maintenance-free and clean)
    • ABS Pro, Dynamic ESA, ASC, heated grips, heated seat, cruise control
    • Ergos very similar to RTW which is balanced for ST
    • Styling/paint will emphasize sport, whereas ergos and features will match sport & tour requirements)
    • 520lb fully fueled w/ empty panniers


    The P:W ratio of this concept model beats our RTW's, at least the pre 1250 models. At 520lbs with a little lower CoG it will easily outperform RTW. There are ample compromised models out there and some here will throw those names out but none is really what I'm after which is ALL of the comfort and performance of my RTW but in a package that is much friendlier weight-wise. I think it can be done, not cheaply, but very well done. I truly believe if this model debuted and was done really well it would really take off. Its target audience will be aging ST riders, but would appeal to a larger audience I feel. BMW might have a hard time squeezing this model into their lineup perhaps--but w/o a boxer engine it might fit w/o stealing too much share from RTW. F800GT really was too compromised to be a super seller but was on the right track w/ its lower CoG, light weight belt drive.

  13. #43
    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    • 900-1000cc displacement, 115hp, smooth power plant with transverse crankshaft
    • Fully adjustable electrically controlled windscreen
    • Trimmed fairing, lighter/simpler panniers
    • belt drive w/ 50K mile change interval (much lighter, more efficient, maintenance-free and clean)
    • ABS Pro, Dynamic ESA, ASC, heated grips, heated seat, cruise control
    • Ergos very similar to RTW which is balanced for ST
    • Styling/paint will emphasize sport, whereas ergos and features will match sport & tour requirements)
    • 520lb fully fueled w/ empty panniers
    Add to this list a lowered seat height (say 29" or 30").

    If any manufacturer offered such a machine I would be the first in line to check it out. I'm not a fan of the Rotax engines because they sound like they've got pea gravel banging around in the crankcase and are hot.
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

  14. #44
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pappy35 View Post
    I dropped my RT at the rally in one of the training classes. Four key things to remember:

    1. Once it starts going over, unless you're the Hulk or remembered to eat your Wheaties that morning, all you can really do is set it down as gently as possible. Accept that it's going down and there's nothing you can do about it in most cases and you're less likely to hurt yourself by trying to do something you can't.
    2. Make sure to kill the engine immediately. Being keeled over messes with the oil supply to the head that's farthest from the ground and can pool in the lower one. This has to be your FIRST action after recovering your posture or you'll be buying many more expensive parts afterwards.
    3. Watch some videos about lifting dropped bikes. You have to keep your back and arms straight, your arms straight and parallel to your back, and lift with your legs. I'm almost 55, only 5'6" and about as far from being strong as you can get and still be able to walk. I picked up the RT like it was a five year old using the right technique. It was the first (and so far only) time I dropped this bike and I was amazed at how easy it was to pick up. I dropped my FJR 10 years ago (when I was just 44) and it seemed harder than the RT to get back up.
    4. Remember to lower the side stand BEFORE you lift it up. I didn't and luckily someone else there ran over and did it for me or I would have had to set it back down again (it fell to the right). That would have been REALLY embarrassing.
    Also, make sure the bike is in gear when you start to lift it. If not, the bike will roll as you lift and in addition to the weight of the bike, you'll likely twist your torso to hold onto it...your lower back will not like that. DAMHIK.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

  15. #45
    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powwow View Post
    Also, make sure the bike is in gear when you start to lift it. If not, the bike will roll as you lift and in addition to the weight of the bike, you'll likely twist your torso to hold onto it...your lower back will not like that. DAMHIK.
    Right on. Missed that. Yeah, that would be #2 behind shutting the engine off.
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

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