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Thread: Down the Rabbit hole on a 1998 K1200RS

  1. #16
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    I have a small accumulation of BMW bikes. My bikes arn't the super high value unobtainium models. Two of them kinda fit this discussion an '87 K100 and a '94 R1100RS. Both carried me 1,000's of miles on great rides; really adventures. At one time they were pretty much the latest/greatest. Now they're pretty much valueless on the used bike market. Each bike has about 50,000 miles on the od.I plan to put a little more money into them and keep riding them to new adventures.

  2. #17
    Rally Rat 1074's Avatar
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    I'm 71 years old. The new bikes don't exactly trip my trigger. As per spousal instruction, I have reduced my fleet down to the two neatest BMWs I've ever owned. I have a K75C and an R80ST. I do my own maintenance to save money. I figure that these two will last me for the rest of my riding days.
    I guess the bottom line is that if you enjoy what you have then sit back and enjoy. We aren't getting any younger.
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  3. #18
    Registered User AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    The K12RS was an amazing bike for its time and I think it has aged pretty well other than being heavy. It's rock-solid, electric smooth, and fast. Eats front tires like crazy when ridden hard.

    But, the crank O-ring will leak and it will need other things. If you like the bike better than the current offerings, it's not money wasted to make that one great. And don't think of it as an expensive $2500 bike unless you can buy one with a new crank O-ring, new radiator and all of that for $2500 somewhere.
    Anton Largiader 72724
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  4. #19
    Nick Kennedy
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    A friend has a K1200 RS and I got to ride in on a high speed twisty road for 100 miles last summer.
    That is a awesome machine, it had new Michelin's on it, so powerful and likes to corner like crazy.
    If you could find a serviced one for 2-3k in garaged, clean shape, that would be a nice ride.
    Older used M/C 's can be soo cheap.
    I use the be patient, but keep looking and let them come to me method to buy.
    I'm a cheap bastard and that method has worked for me my whole life.
    When a smokin deal comes available, be ready to jump.

  5. #20
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    It's about value to you, not cost.

    The only time I consider the market value of a vehicle relevant to a repair decision is if I intend to sell it immediately. I think otherwise it's a false comparison. Right now you can find certain coveted Airheads selling for more than a good example of a K1200RS. That is totally crazy to me based on what I want in a motorcycle. It's like paying more for a Cessna than an F-18. But, it's just a reflection of the emotional (irrational) aspect of market demand. And, in my case this kind of situation let's me buy the bike(s) I love at stupid cheap prices.

    So, when the time comes I have to decide to repair or dispose of a vehicle I love I think about what I could get as a replacment for the sum of the repair cost and the value of the machine that I would like as well or better, and that would in as good or better condition (and not having unknown problems of it's own). Or do I really want to go for something new or at least much newer?

    I bought my black 2003 K1200RS new, and it only has about 65,000 miles on it. I've done the rear main seal/O-ring but nothing else so far, but I would put a lot of money into that bike because there is no other bike I've ever ridden that does half as well what the K12 was designed to do. It fits my riding style like it was made for me. It's a total keeper for me. So, if I had to put $3,000 or $4,000 into it, I would do that, or (given current market conditions) buy one like it for that money.

    Not every bike or car or whatever is like that, so sometimes a big repair expense is just the excuse you were looking for to make a change. I think it's about what makes you happy, and that - for me anyway - is not correlated with the cost of a thing.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by GREGFEELER View Post
    The only time I consider the market value of a vehicle relevant to a repair decision is if I intend to sell it immediately.
    I agree. Case in point. Big Red, Voni's venerable R1100RS, at 402,000 miles started to make ugly bottom end noises. Economics 201: A new crankshaft is north of $1,500. Add in gaskets, bearings and incidentals and we are something over $2,000. What is an R1100RS with 402,000 miles worth on the market? Who with any conscience at all would part out much of anything on a 402K bike? On the other hand a complete R1100 engine from a dismantler (formerly called a junk yard) with low miles from a wreck can be had for $500. Plus a lot of labor to remove and replace. But it was Big Red! So a nearly worthless motorcycle from an economic standpoint got a $500 low mileage engine which made a very useful motorcycle once again. She rode it 238 miles around the block just the other day.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  7. #22
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I agree. Case in point. Big Red, Voni's venerable R1100RS, at 402,000 miles started to make ugly bottom end noises. Economics 201: A new crankshaft is north of $1,500. Add in gaskets, bearings and incidentals and we are something over $2,000. What is an R1100RS with 402,000 miles worth on the market? Who with any conscience at all would part out much of anything on a 402K bike? On the other hand a complete R1100 engine from a dismantler (formerly called a junk yard) with low miles from a wreck can be had for $500. Plus a lot of labor to remove and replace. But it was Big Red! So a nearly worthless motorcycle from an economic standpoint got a $500 low mileage engine which made a very useful motorcycle once again. She rode it 238 miles around the block just the other day.
    Perfect example, Paul!

    I don't drive my car very much. I bought a loaded GLX Jetta new in 2000 and it's now got 98,000 miles on it. Mechanically perfect, interior virtually like new, new shocks and struts 15,000 miles ago, brakes and rotors one time. Three years ago the clear coat started to go away in a big way and it was looking really bad. My paint and body guy would paint it for about $3,600 which he thought was a lot to put into a car that old. I thought I would have my Jetta virtually as a new car for only $3,600 after 20 years of service, and with another reliable 100k in it easily. I knew his paint job would be as new (it is), so not everyone's choice but made sense to me.
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    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  8. #23
    Nick Kennedy
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    Greg
    Re your comment on certain airheads commanding a high price.
    Have you ever owned one?
    They are truly Iconic machines that are easy to work on, fun as hell to ride [ at least mine is ] and there not making them anymore.
    I've got a 1978 R80 with a big luftmeister fairing, new overhauled Ted Porter Heads, New Ikon rear shock, nice big aftermarket seat, Avon road rider tires. Its also stock with points and tubes.
    I LOVE THAT THING and many others do too.
    Yea mine has weak brakes, I just plan ahead.
    I still do at least one long tour a year on it. Last year went out down through central Utah to Pioche Nv and back to Colorado.
    The sound and feel cruising at 5,000 rpm is the best as all airhead owners know. Thats a real sweet spot.
    Every month or so I look at the marketplace for a late model Airhead like 1990-1995 R 80 RT, but owning 3 bikes now is my limit.
    My first road bike at 21 was a 1976 Honda CB 750 with a big windjammer fairing, this was back in 1979. That set the hook for life. It was sitting in a garage down the street covered in dust with flat tires. I approached the owner and he said it didn't run. I was heavily in the VW world and took a guess it was the points that had closed up. I got it for 950 bucks!
    It looked brand new I think it had less than 20k on the clock.
    I blew up the tires and pushed it home. Bought a new battery, back when they were still cheap, opened up the point gap by eye and it started right up! What a machine for that era and it was mine.

    Sorry I'm really rambling here, due to Corona I'm in lockdown and getting bored.

    I saw that R80 I got in a garage owned by a friend of mine; same thing he said one day it wouldn't start and it sat for 2 years. Also got that baby dirt cheap and opened the point gap and away I went- a BMW owner!
    So my long way around comment is those airheads have alot of soul to them. they are still practical and corner great.
    Parts are readily available as is any service you want or need.
    These are a few of the reasons the value of those old now airheads has been creeping up IMHO
    Ride safe in 2020

  9. #24
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickrides View Post
    Greg
    Re your comment on certain airheads commanding a high price.
    Have you ever owned one?
    They are truly Iconic machines that are easy to work on, fun as hell to ride [ at least mine is ] and there not making them anymore.
    I've got a 1978 R80 with a big luftmeister fairing, new overhauled Ted Porter Heads, New Ikon rear shock, nice big aftermarket seat, Avon road rider tires. Its also stock with points and tubes.
    I LOVE THAT THING and many others do too.
    Yea mine has weak brakes, I just plan ahead.
    I still do at least one long tour a year on it. Last year went out down through central Utah to Pioche Nv and back to Colorado.
    The sound and feel cruising at 5,000 rpm is the best as all airhead owners know. Thats a real sweet spot.
    Every month or so I look at the marketplace for a late model Airhead like 1990-1995 R 80 RT, but owning 3 bikes now is my limit.
    My first road bike at 21 was a 1976 Honda CB 750 with a big windjammer fairing, this was back in 1979. That set the hook for life. It was sitting in a garage down the street covered in dust with flat tires. I approached the owner and he said it didn't run. I was heavily in the VW world and took a guess it was the points that had closed up. I got it for 950 bucks!
    It looked brand new I think it had less than 20k on the clock.
    I blew up the tires and pushed it home. Bought a new battery, back when they were still cheap, opened up the point gap by eye and it started right up! What a machine for that era and it was mine.

    Sorry I'm really rambling here, due to Corona I'm in lockdown and getting bored.

    I saw that R80 I got in a garage owned by a friend of mine; same thing he said one day it wouldn't start and it sat for 2 years. Also got that baby dirt cheap and opened the point gap and away I went- a BMW owner!
    So my long way around comment is those airheads have alot of soul to them. they are still practical and corner great.
    Parts are readily available as is any service you want or need.
    These are a few of the reasons the value of those old now airheads has been creeping up IMHO
    Ride safe in 2020

    Good points, and I don't disagree with any of them. In fact, I've had a number of Airheads - R65's, R100RS's, /5's, /2's, etc. I worked in a BMW shop in my early 20's and sold many dozens of them, and attended the BMW service school. I can still remember the unique smell of a brand new out-of-the-crate /5, /6, or /7 when it was started for the first time. They produced an intoxicating "new bike" smell that is unforgettable. I still have the 1972 R75/5 I took out of the crate brand new. So, I get the attraction of Airheads, and I love riding mine.

    However, my point is not that they are "overpriced" but rather that most K-bike (flying brick) models are selling so cheap. Personally, I love my Airhead, but for me for a daily rider or a cross-county mile-eater, nothing beats a K75, K100, K1100, or K1200. In my opinion, compared to an Airhead they require a fraction of the service, the engines and transmissions last longer, are faster, have better frames, and stronger electrics. The 1100s and 1200s are modern enough to get you into radial tires, immensely powerful brakes, Paralever rear suspension and Telelever front suspension, and all have fuel injection and ABS (some version) available. And unlike most BMW models of the last ten years, a competent home mechanic can perform virtually any maintenance that would normally be required in 200,000 miles.

    However, that is my opinion and feeling. What makes a person love a bike has little of anything to do with specifications or technology. I call it "grin factor". Some bikes just give you a great big grin when you ride them more so than another bike, and I know and understand that there is something about Airheads which does that for a *lot* of people. That was true back in the day I was selling them new and it's true now.

    I had two '88 Pearl White R100RSs at one time. The first was just average in appearance with some "character" marks. The second was like it just came out of the box. But the first just had something special about it that would make me grin like a Cheshire Cat and was a total blast to ride. The second - beautiful one - was a dud. Boring, cold, and distant. I made the big mistake of selling the fun bike because I was overly enamored with the beauty of the second bike and I didn't want to keep them both. Big mistake! The second bike was so boring I sold it in a couple of months. My neighbor bought the first one from me and still has it, and I can hear it sing to me every time he fires it up! I did find a beautiful 1992 K75S that did for me what the fun R100RS did, and it's now a permanent part of my collection. I learned the hard way about "grin factor."

    So, I'm in no way dissing Airheads or the attraction to them, or trying to start an Airhead vs. K-Bike "my bike is better than yours" war. Rather, this thread was about the wisdom of putting money into a K1200RS given it's market value. As I said earlier, unless you are hot on selling that bike, market value is the wrong metric - it's what it means to you, and how much it makes you grin when you ride it. Very hard to put a dollar value on that IMHO.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  10. #25
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    I love airheads, as I said before, they're my favorite motorcycle. Once sorted, they're very reliable. But I have to say, my non ABS k75 is superior. Handles better than most airheads, although my 1995 r100r handled as good and had better brakes. Dollar for dollar it's hard to beat a nicely kept k75 on the used market. YMMV.

  11. #26
    Nick Kennedy
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    Seems like were all in the same boat here.
    I've also got a 1990 K75RT
    Its got a new Ikon rear shock and new Michelin Pilot Activ tires.
    That thing is also awesome, I'll never sell it!
    I'm going to go ride it in a few minutes.
    I've also got a 2014 Kawasaki C-14
    That thing is in a different zipcode, it should be illegal really.
    Ride safe boys in 2020

  12. #27
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickrides View Post
    SNIP...I've also got a 2014 Kawasaki C-14
    That thing is in a different zipcode, it should be illegal really.

    And I'll bet that is exactly why you like it.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  13. #28

    R vs k

    Iíve got a 2000 K1200RS that I paid $3000 for with 3000 miles, I also have a 2007 R1200S. I defineatly prefer the R, but it is hard on my arse. The K is fun and fast, but it just isnít the same as the R.

  14. #29
    Mehrten
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREGFEELER View Post
    I don't drive my car very much. I bought a loaded GLX Jetta new in 2000 and it's now got 98,000 miles on it. Mechanically perfect, interior virtually like new, new shocks and struts 15,000 miles ago, brakes and rotors one time. Three years ago the clear coat started to go away in a big way and it was looking really bad. My paint and body guy would paint it for about $3,600 which he thought was a lot to put into a car that old. I thought I would have my Jetta virtually as a new car for only $3,600 after 20 years of service, and with another reliable 100k in it easily. I knew his paint job would be as new (it is), so not everyone's choice but made sense to me.
    Greg,

    Wanda and I have owned two BMW automobiles in our life times - a 1986 325ES and a 1990 BMW M3 both from brand new. And we still own them.

    When the starter motor on the 325ES went Tango Uniform at 180,000 miles it took two years and 5 tries to get it right. Bimmer dealer in Tucson said they were sorry they couldn't fix her. A brand new starter, not a re-manufactured one, did the trick.

    Then it was the transmission on the ES. I was ready to buy a new one out of Germany if needed - $3,500. At the last minute the needed part was found in Ohio or was it Indiana. She has 265,000 miles on her now.

    The M3 was broken in on the German Autobahns. With 105,000 miles on her we have had no issues. None. Knock on wood.

    Back to Beemers.

    Our 2002 K1200RS was a rescue from the local Honda Shop. At 63,000 miles and five past owners in 10 years, she was ridden into the ground.

    I did the rear main seal and o ring job and lots of other stuff. In the end I spent more to get her road worthy than she is worth dollar wise by far.

    She is the one I plan to keep riding until I can't wobble down the road on two wheels any more.

    Ride what makes you feel good.

    PS I did meet up with Ned who started this thread. He has a very nice KRS that will keep him grinning for many years.

  15. #30
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mehrten View Post
    Greg,

    Wanda and I have owned two BMW automobiles in our life times - a 1986 325ES and a 1990 BMW M3 both from brand new. And we still own them.

    When the starter motor on the 325ES went Tango Uniform at 180,000 miles it took two years and 5 tries to get it right. Bimmer dealer in Tucson said they were sorry they couldn't fix her. A brand new starter, not a re-manufactured one, did the trick.

    Then it was the transmission on the ES. I was ready to buy a new one out of Germany if needed - $3,500. At the last minute the needed part was found in Ohio or was it Indiana. She has 265,000 miles on her now.

    The M3 was broken in on the German Autobahns. With 105,000 miles on her we have had no issues. None. Knock on wood.

    Back to Beemers.

    Our 2002 K1200RS was a rescue from the local Honda Shop. At 63,000 miles and five past owners in 10 years, she was ridden into the ground.

    I did the rear main seal and o ring job and lots of other stuff. In the end I spent more to get her road worthy than she is worth dollar wise by far.

    She is the one I plan to keep riding until I can't wobble down the road on two wheels any more.

    Ride what makes you feel good.

    PS I did meet up with Ned who started this thread. He has a very nice KRS that will keep him grinning for many years.

    Copy that!!
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

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