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Thread: Cones and friction zone clutch work

  1. #1

    Cones and friction zone clutch work

    2012 r1200GS, dry clutch. I've been told not to use the dry clutch bikes for cone work where constantly using the friction zone is mandatory. I'm also told the leo's who've used the BMW dry clutches in cone burn them up pretty quickly. Also told to keep the rpm's below 1500 and it won't be an issue, but the leo's are using their at or below that already and they're beating the clutches up pretty good.

    Consensus on using extensive friction zone on the dry clutch?
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  2. #2
    Registered User Coma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    2012 r1200GS, dry clutch. I've been told not to use the dry clutch bikes for cone work where constantly using the friction zone is mandatory. I'm also told the leo's who've used the BMW dry clutches in cone burn them up pretty quickly. Also told to keep the rpm's below 1500 and it won't be an issue, but the leo's are using their at or below that already and they're beating the clutches up pretty good.

    Consensus on using extensive friction zone on the dry clutch?
    Practice is critical to gain the skills at slow speed maneuvering. Lower rpms heat the clutch less but make it easier to stall. Higher heat the clutch. I certainly wouldnít use it beyond smelling the clutch without letting it cool. In the end it costs what it costs. Weight transfer and body position contribute also and neither heat the clutch.

    I have found that using a bicycle to practice slow speed maneuvers transfers to the MC.
    2008 R1200GS

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Coma View Post
    Practice is critical to gain the skills at slow speed maneuvering. Lower rpms heat the clutch less but make it easier to stall. Higher heat the clutch. I certainly wouldnít use it beyond smelling the clutch without letting it cool. In the end it costs what it costs. Weight transfer and body position contribute also and neither heat the clutch.

    I have found that using a bicycle to practice slow speed maneuvers transfers to the MC.

    Been through two police motor courses with the 07 K1200GT.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

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    Registered User Coma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Been through two police motor courses with the 07 K1200GT.
    Oops! Let me go get the egg off my face.
    2008 R1200GS

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Coma View Post
    Oops! Let me go get the egg off my face.
    Not necessary sir, your observations on cone work was spot on.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

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    Registered User Coma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Not necessary sir, your observations on cone work was spot on.
    Thank you for being gracious.

    Your question triggered a search for more information which resulted in the discovery of a course that teaches Motor Officer technique.

    https://www.ridelikeapro.com/rider-classes/

    In there is a practice guide with tips and cone work. Itís something that Iíve been looking for as distance makes attending problematic.

    Thank you!
    2008 R1200GS

  7. #7
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    If just doing cones to build skills, you might start with widely spaced cones that allow full clutch engagement. Decrease cone spacing as skills increase. Surprisingly tight turns can be made at idle without slipping the clutch.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    If just doing cones to build skills, you might start with widely spaced cones that allow full clutch engagement. Decrease cone spacing as skills increase. Surprisingly tight turns can be made at idle without slipping the clutch.
    First course we started with 22' circles, then dropped to 20, then to 18. I'm good with 18's the way I was trained slipping the clutch. Both motor courses dictated the skills. Yes, tight turns can be made at idle, but it's not going to get you into the top 10 riders if you dawdle like that
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  9. #9
    Registered User Coma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    If just doing cones to build skills, you might start with widely spaced cones that allow full clutch engagement. Decrease cone spacing as skills increase. Surprisingly tight turns can be made at idle without slipping the clutch.
    Thank you for your insight.

    The practice cone work seems like a great way to assess skills and point to opportunities to improve. What o donít want to do is train bad habits.

    Sorry for derailing you original post, I still think the skills are worth what is costs from the clutch.
    2008 R1200GS

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Coma View Post
    Thank you for your insight.

    The practice cone work seems like a great way to assess skills and point to opportunities to improve. What o don’t want to do is train bad habits.

    Sorry for derailing you original post, I still think the skills are worth what is costs from the clutch.
    Maybe apples and oranges, but in the '80s we attended between 8 and 15 weekend rallies in a year. And Voni used her R80 or R65 in field events every rally. And she got a new clutch every year. Price of doing business on the rally circuit.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  11. #11
    Registered User Coma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Maybe apples and oranges, but in the '80s we attended between 8 and 15 weekend rallies in a year. And Voni used her R80 or R65 in field events every rally. And she got a new clutch every year. Price of doing business on the rally circuit.
    Thank you. I hope I donít need one that often. I donít know what the field events require, if they are off pavement Iíd say it would be harder on the clutch.

    That said, the skills are important. Iíve the tools and space to do a clutch so weíll see.
    2008 R1200GS

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