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Thread: Here's to quality design and construction! (and just good luck)

  1. #16
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    Glad you are OK

    First and foremost, glad to hear you walked away. Concussions heal. Other types of injuries....

    One has to keep alert at all times. Earlier this year I was coming up to a stop light with a vehicle in front of me and what I thought was a vehicle behind that was going to stop. I make a habit of checking my rear view mirrors every time I slow to stop. This older Ford Explorer behind me did not seem to be slowing down enough. When I looked closer, I saw the woman’s head pointed down (at her cell phone I assumed) with no idea what was in front of her.

    I managed to scoot around the stopped car in front of me and got into the turning lane, just in time to hear tires squeal and the infamous “Crunch” of two cars colliding. If I had not been paying attention, I would have been the filling in that sandwich. Coolant and parts all over the road. When she hit, probably only doing 15-20 mph, but looked a lot worse from the damage.

    When the police came, I shared my observations with them along with what I assumed was the cell phone distraction. Sad part is that the woman turned to me and asked me what I was doing there. She not only was distracted at the time of the crash, she was completely ignorant of her surroundings and others on the road.

    It could have been a lot worse and I thank God that someone was watching out for me that day.

  2. #17
    Registered User discoboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 71243 View Post
    Even though you were wearing a helmet ? Do you know what your head hit?

    Sorry this happened to you ! Hope you heal quickly & completely.
    I think my helmet bounced off the back of the SUV in front of me. At the very least the impact caused whiplash.

    The helmet protected me from visible damage (took an impact on the face mask too), but when you stop a helmet in motion the brain inside your skull is still moving and bangs up against the inside of your skull. Brain sheering I think they call it.
    An evil barbarian with a wrench in his pocket

  3. #18
    Registered User discoboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickp View Post
    First and foremost, glad to hear you walked away. Concussions heal. Other types of injuries....

    One has to keep alert at all times. Earlier this year I was coming up to a stop light with a vehicle in front of me and what I thought was a vehicle behind that was going to stop. I make a habit of checking my rear view mirrors every time I slow to stop. This older Ford Explorer behind me did not seem to be slowing down enough. When I looked closer, I saw the woman’s head pointed down (at her cell phone I assumed) with no idea what was in front of her.

    I managed to scoot around the stopped car in front of me and got into the turning lane, just in time to hear tires squeal and the infamous “Crunch” of two cars colliding. If I had not been paying attention, I would have been the filling in that sandwich. Coolant and parts all over the road. When she hit, probably only doing 15-20 mph, but looked a lot worse from the damage.

    When the police came, I shared my observations with them along with what I assumed was the cell phone distraction. Sad part is that the woman turned to me and asked me what I was doing there. She not only was distracted at the time of the crash, she was completely ignorant of her surroundings and others on the road.

    It could have been a lot worse and I thank God that someone was watching out for me that day.
    FWIW, I instinctively check my mirrors whenever slowing down, stopping or turning. I make every effort to let other drivers around me know what I'm doing (blinking the brake light, turn signals augmented by hand signals, direct eye contact), and I try to be aware of all possibilities for other vehicles around me (unexpected stops, unexpected turns, etc.). In this case I had already checked before stopping but, having been long (relatively) stopped I was not staring at the rear view mirrors, so I was caught unawares when this guy rear ended me. Not sure what I could have done to avoid this one other than not ride motorcycles at all.

    He was playing with his cell phone. Just like the ******* that rear ended my car in March, also at a stop light. Cell phones are the real problem.
    An evil barbarian with a wrench in his pocket

  4. #19
    Watch This!!! junkjohn's Avatar
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    The operator of the cellphone is the problem. Hope you are doing OK. I had a young girl roll into me one day so slow I thought my clutch was giving out. That is when I noticed her thumb typing, so I laid on my horn and started screaming at her. I stayed upright. She started crying and said she was going to call the police on me. I advised her that she better call the police, and she drove off. By the way I grew up in Fitchburg so we used to go to Worcester a lot. Again I hope all is well with you and keep riding.
    John Simonds
    2017 R 1200 GS Adventure
    1975 Norton Commando 850 Roadster Mk 3
    If it ain't broke, fix it 'till it is.

  5. #20
    I have installed a TIR strobe light (red) on the rear fender of all of my bikes. This TIR light is similar to that found on law enforcement and emergency vehicles. Most of these types of lights have multiple blink patterns from which to choose. I use a blink pattern that is three rapid red flashes followed by a brief pause then the pattern repeats. This strobe light is set to illuminate while my brake light is on. I have aimed the light to be horizontal (versus slightly pointing upward as would be the case if directly mounted to the fender). I use some small plastic spacers and a grinder to set the angle for the strobe lights. My goal is not to blind the car directly behind me, but rather to get the attention of someone a hundred or more yards back. Such a continuously flashing light is not legal in some states; it is ok in NC where I now live. Many states have an ordinance prohibiting making one's vehicle appear as an emergency vehicle. I can make an argument that this supplemental brake light is not easily confused with an emergency vehicle, but is a safety feature in this age of distracted drivers.

    It was a bit of a challenge to get this fitted to a bike using CANBUS. On my 2018 R1200RTW I discovered that the black-grey-yellow wire in the rear cowl does not use PWM to drive the brake light. This wire is used for the aux LED on the optional top box and works to drive the TIR strobe. Following is an image of one such light; there are many similar options available. Links are provided to a few examples -

    81luaB-dCtL._SL1500_.jpg


    https://www.amazon.com/Swift-Emergen...gateway&sr=8-7

    https://www.amazon.com/NanoFlare-Pat...gateway&sr=8-4

    https://www.amazon.com/Abrams-T3-R-E...WG4CYC302N6Z2E

    https://www.amazon.com/Whelen-Engine...%2C133&sr=8-31

  6. #21

    Crashing and Concussions

    Quote Originally Posted by discoboy View Post
    I used to ride a 1999 BMW R1100RT. I absolutely loved it. Everything I wanted in a bike. It was just broken in (21k miles) and purring.

    I was rear-ended by a car two days ago. I was stopped at a traffic signal and the car hit me from behind at full speed (25 to 30 MPH). The impact drove me and the bike forward into the stopped SUV in front of me. Parts all over the road. I'm pretty sure the bike is totaled. But the really amazing part? Except for minor abrasions I appear to be perfectly OK! I've been to the hospital, had all the tests and imaging. No broken bones, nothing. Looks like the R1100RT absorbed most of the energy. Plus, I was sitting high enough so the impact of the car behind me (Mustang) was below me at the rear wheel level. Of course, I was wearing a Shoei helmet, which helped, too.

    So, here's to excellent design and construction!

    This was my first BMW motorcycle. Now I have another reason to love it. Already looking at the new R1250RT. Beautiful bike.
    So glad you weren't permanently injured or killed. Concussions are nasty business indeed. I've hit and survived two deer strikes.

    The 2nd one laid me out cold for about 30 min. (very rural area of northern MI) and if not for my full face Shoei and leathers, I'm sure it would have been a permanent "laid out".

    Be very careful with the concussion. For about two weeks, my head was totally scrambled, couldn't be around anyone talking, loud noises, loud lights, or else I would get a migraine. I have a sad appreciation for those NFL guys who think they're gonna be fine later in life after all those shots to the head.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by robsryder View Post
    I have installed a TIR strobe light (red) on the rear fender of all of my bikes. This TIR light is similar to that found on law enforcement and emergency vehicles. Most of these types of lights have multiple blink patterns from which to choose. I use a blink pattern that is three rapid red flashes followed by a brief pause then the pattern repeats. This strobe light is set to illuminate while my brake light is on. I have aimed the light to be horizontal (versus slightly pointing upward as would be the case if directly mounted to the fender). I use some small plastic spacers and a grinder to set the angle for the strobe lights. My goal is not to blind the car directly behind me, but rather to get the attention of someone a hundred or more yards back. Such a continuously flashing light is not legal in some states; it is ok in NC where I now live. Many states have an ordinance prohibiting making one's vehicle appear as an emergency vehicle. I can make an argument that this supplemental brake light is not easily confused with an emergency vehicle, but is a safety feature in this age of distracted drivers.

    It was a bit of a challenge to get this fitted to a bike using CANBUS. On my 2018 R1200RTW I discovered that the black-grey-yellow wire in the rear cowl does not use PWM to drive the brake light. This wire is used for the aux LED on the optional top box and works to drive the TIR strobe. Following is an image of one such light; there are many similar options available. Links are provided to a few examples -

    81luaB-dCtL._SL1500_.jpg


    https://www.amazon.com/Swift-Emergen...gateway&sr=8-7

    https://www.amazon.com/NanoFlare-Pat...gateway&sr=8-4

    https://www.amazon.com/Abrams-T3-R-E...WG4CYC302N6Z2E

    https://www.amazon.com/Whelen-Engine...%2C133&sr=8-31
    Here in NY i had a heck of a time getting my Triumph to pass inspection with a simple three flashes and then steady...HIS close reading of NYS guidlines precluded flashing brake lights- I'd rather be safe than legal!
    Last edited by rick601; 08-21-2019 at 09:40 PM.

  8. #23
    Registered User drneo66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick601 View Post
    Here in NY i had a heck of a time getting my Triumph to pass inspection with a simple three flashes and then steady...HIS close reading of NYS guidlines precluded flashing brake lights- I'd rather be safe than legal!
    A lot of states allow you to have a pulsating/flashing light, but only a certain amount of times before it must turn steady. (I believe California is the most strict). Both the Admore Lighting System and the Skene System I use have the ability to change the amount of flashes before it turns. The Admore goes a step further by flashing a white light (not illegal?) for a further five seconds after the red light turns steady.

    For example the Tennesee law states "No non-emergency vehicle shall operate or install emergency flashing light systems such as strobe, wig-wag, or other flashing lights in tail light lamp, stoplight area, or factory installed emergency flasher and backup light area; provided, however, that the foregoing prohibition shall not apply to the utilization of a continuously flashing light system. For the purposes of this part, “continuously flashing light system” means a brake light system in which the brake lamp pulses rapidly for no more than five (5) seconds when the brake is applied, and then converts to a continuous light as a normal brake lamp until the time that the brake is released."


    Either way, I'll gladly keep it on my bike and pay the fine.
    Current: 2007 BMW R1200RT, 2013 F800GS
    Former: 1995 BMW K75S, 2009 BMW G650GS
    MOA Member #:150400, IBA#: 37558

  9. #24
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    Got Hyperlights in my old KRS, by PO. Work great. Slow continuous flashs when brakes applied. Mounted in stock lens, a row of four small light stacks outside main rear bulb, likely as many here.

    They get the rear driver's attention unlike the standard brake light in my other BMW. All I gotta do is touch the brakes lightly before shfiting down, touch again and so forth. The drivers behind always come up with lots of space slowly. Great! Marvelous safety gadget.

    So, what exactly do our highly intelligent lawmakers have a problem with motorcycle safety, in this case? They think my bike looks like an emergency vehicle? For a few seconds? Have never seen a motorcycle sitting by side of road, brakes on, brake light flashing constantly. Never.

    If I'm last in line I do flash any approaching cars. Then I sit in neutral, which I'm sure is also against the law, and MCS course work.

    Just when you think you've heard it all, another beauty comes over the airwaves. So, cut the wires and get smashed, thanx for nothing.

  10. #25
    From the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Motorcycle Operators' Manual, p 25 -

    Brake Light
    Your motorcycle’s brake light is usually
    not as noticeable as the brake lights on
    a car — particularly when your taillight
    is on. (It goes on with the headlight.)
    If the situation will permit, help others
    notice you by flashing your brake light
    before you slow down
    . It is especially
    important to flash your brake light

    before:
    • You slow more quickly than
    others might expect (turning off a
    high-speed highway).
    • You slow where others may not
    expect it (in the middle of a block or
    at an alley).

    If you are being followed closely, it’s
    a good idea to flash your brake light
    before you slow. The tailgater may be
    watching you and not see something
    ahead that will make you slow down.
    This will hopefully discourage them from
    tailgating and warn them of hazards
    ahead they may not see.

    https://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/mo...lor_hi_res.pdf

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