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Thread: What is the most popular touring motorcycle?

  1. #16
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    For my wife, eliminating night shades has helped reduce the frequency of migraines. Previously, she was diagnosed with a wheat allergy which causes respiratory problems like asthma. In any case, during the switch to gluten-free, she found a strong correlation between her migraines and various gluten-free products. Eliminating those with potato starch (which is a large number of the available products) has helped with the migraines.

    Strange, she never had a migraine before we got married......
    I feel sorry for anyone who's Celiac because gluten is in so many things.
    I read a lot of labels when I grocery shop trying to avoid it as much as possible.
    I cook simple meals for two reasons. I'm not a very good cook and it's easier to not have gluten if you keep the meals simple.

    I'm not gluten free but eat very little of it because I'm too lazy to make two separate meals.

    There must be a lot of gluten free people in Canada because they have figured out how to make good tasting gluten free bread and crust.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
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    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  2. #17
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    I feel sorry for anyone who's Celiac because gluten is in so many things.
    I read a lot of labels when I grocery shop trying to avoid it as much as possible.
    I cook simple meals for two reasons. I'm not a very good cook and it's easier to not have gluten if you keep the meals simple.

    I'm not gluten free but eat very little of it because I'm too lazy to make two separate meals.

    There must be a lot of gluten free people in Canada because they have figured out how to make good tasting gluten free bread and crust.
    Gluten free food has become dramatically more mainstream in just the five years my wife and I have been eating that way. The gluten free section of the grocery store used to be about two feet of one shelf. Now, there are huge sections of the store devoted to gluten free products...and they're really good!

    The product that has probably made the most progress in the past two years has been gluten free beer (which used to taste like $#%). There are some very good beers out there now, including those from a completely gluten free brewery in Seattle called Ghostfish...their grapefruit IPA is fantastic.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

  3. #18
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    I feel sorry for anyone who's Celiac because gluten is in so many things.
    I read a lot of labels when I grocery shop trying to avoid it as much as possible.
    I cook simple meals for two reasons. I'm not a very good cook and it's easier to not have gluten if you keep the meals simple.

    I'm not gluten free but eat very little of it because I'm too lazy to make two separate meals.

    There must be a lot of gluten free people in Canada because they have figured out how to make good tasting gluten free bread and crust.
    Interestingly, Celiac's is a digestive disorder ( the Mom-in-Law is celiac). My wife's allergy is a respiratory and heart rate reaction.

    It's a change, but nothing that can't be overcome. Canyon Bakehouse bread works for us, but some of their products do have nightshades.
    Cave contents: 16 R12RS, 13 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & SawStop PCS175
    1) My expectations are never low enough & 2) Incompetence is infinite ........David Brooks

  4. #19
    Registered User wbrownell9's Avatar
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    I thought it was hilarious, as I was coming back from Alaska pretty much all I saw were adventure bikes (although I did see 2 Harleys [and a scooter!] on the Top of the World Highway). Once I got to Dawson Creek BC (start/end of the Alaska Highway) it was like a switch had been thrown, it was all Harleys and sportbikes, ADV bikes evaporated.
    2020 R1250 GSA Low

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnybow View Post
    Well, I'd have to believe that by the numbers, you'll be more likely to see more HD than any other simply because there are far more HD bikes sold that all others (probably) combined.
    Now, getting down to numbers.....there are also more HD bikes for sale each year with less than 5000 miles on them than other bikes. With that info (that isn't proven fact, just guess work) I'd say that as far as true touring miles logged, there's no way that the average HD has more true touring miles than BMW bikes do.
    I have owned a few HD's and in my travels, most guys I see do under 2000 miles a year on their bikes and very rarely leave home to ride. Sure, trailering to Daytona for a week to ride 400 miles is a big accomplishment but realistically, not many have a bunch of miles on them. Even full dress HD bikes never go far from home.
    I feel compelled to disagree a little with you, but it is a minor point. I don't know what an average HD rider is. There are some who only ride on weekends and on sunny days but most of the Harley riders I know ride the damned wheels off their bikes. I have been on plenty of cross-country trips and the predominant bike I see on the road is a Harley bagger. And when I check into a hotel somewhere, the most common bike in the parking lot is a Harley covered with mud and dust. I personally believe "real" Harley riders get a bum rap because of the few that we see around urban areas and in front of bars on weekends.
    Royce
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  6. #21
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by royce View Post
    I feel compelled to disagree a little with you, but it is a minor point. I don't know what an average HD rider is. There are some who only ride on weekends and on sunny days but most of the Harley riders I know ride the damned wheels off their bikes. I have been on plenty of cross-country trips and the predominant bike I see on the road is a Harley bagger. And when I check into a hotel somewhere, the most common bike in the parking lot is a Harley covered with mud and dust. I personally believe "real" Harley riders get a bum rap because of the few that we see around urban areas and in front of bars on weekends.
    That is my experience as well. Honestly, I am just not attracted to cruiser bikes in any way, but it's my experience that there are a lot (certainly numerically and also percentage) of very serious over-the-road Harley riders. I'm met lots of them and had some great conversations and beverages. Two wheels good - any kind of two wheels.
    Greg Feeler
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    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  7. #22
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    I also see a few posts of guys buying a twenty year BMW with only a few thousand miles.

    I don't think the brand of motorcycle has anything to do with miles ridden. It is the rider. I grew up with a guy that put 10,000 miles a year on a Puch moped.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  8. #23
    The last time I compared annual numbers HD out sold BMW 20 to 1. So it stands to reason that folks may see more HD bikes out and about than BMW bikes. But 20 times more? I suspect that a larger proportion of BMW riders do long distance touring than the proportion of HD riders that do. But that is only a hunch and pure speculation on my part.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  9. #24
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    When I first showed up on this form I noticed the annual riding contest. I forget the miles exactly, but a couple guys were burning up 30,000+ a year, some were 2,000-3,000, and the average was around 9,000.

    I also ride with a fairly large Harley group, over 400 riders at one point. We have annual mileage contests too. Funny how one or two riders were running 30,000+ miles a year, some were running 2,000-3,000 and the average for the group was around 9,000 miles.

    I would have expected BMW riders to pound more miles, but it doesn't appear so. IMO, most riders have jobs so they get one or two big rides a year, then a bunch of short one or two day week end rides. Same with the Harley bunch I run with.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by PoorUB View Post
    When I first showed up on this form I noticed the annual riding contest. I forget the miles exactly, but a couple guys were burning up 30,000+ a year, some were 2,000-3,000, and the average was around 9,000.

    I also ride with a fairly large Harley group, over 400 riders at one point. We have annual mileage contests too. Funny how one or two riders were running 30,000+ miles a year, some were running 2,000-3,000 and the average for the group was around 9,000 miles.

    I would have expected BMW riders to pound more miles, but it doesn't appear so. IMO, most riders have jobs so they get one or two big rides a year, then a bunch of short one or two day week end rides. Same with the Harley bunch I run with.
    In the 6 months contest (April to October or so) the high mileage male usually hits 50,000 or so most years. In 1999 Voni rode 77,000 miles and then a couple of years later Ardys Kellerman rode 81,000 in 6 months and after we did a little fund raiser so she could keep riding she topped 100,000 in the calendar year. Ardys was well in her 70s at that time. On the last day of the year she had arrived home with over the 100,000 miles and was gassing the bike one last time for the year and a guy came up to her aand said, "Aren't you a little old to be riding that thing." Amazingly, she let him live.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    In the 6 months contest (April to October or so) the high mileage male usually hits 50,000 or so most years. In 1999 Voni rode 77,000 miles and then a couple of years later Ardys Kellerman rode 81,000 in 6 months and after we did a little fund raiser so she could keep riding she topped 100,000 in the calendar year. Ardys was well in her 70s at that time. On the last day of the year she had arrived home with over the 100,000 miles and was gassing the bike one last time for the year and a guy came up to her aand said, "Aren't you a little old to be riding that thing." Amazingly, she let him live.
    Thx for the reminder of Ardys and Voni. I haven't thought of Ardys in a while. Her end was tragic but her life was amazing. I met her once at Engle's (same place I met you and Voni once, but you probably don't remember me; I was the one wearing Aerostich.)
    Royce
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    2012 F800ST

  12. #27
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    Well, I know of a rider that put 50,000 miles on a Harley in a bit over three months, so there are serious riders out there on all makes.
    From the only real Fargo, ND!

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