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Thread: Tire life - typical?

  1. #1

    Tire life - typical?

    I bought this R1150R last summer and have ridden it about 2300 miles. The rear tire is at the wear bars, but the front is still good. These are Battleax BT-023s that were installed in 2017 (two owners ago). Piecing this together from my riding, the guy I bought it from and the owner before that, it looks like they have about 9200 miles on them.

    Not bad, right?

  2. #2
    Back in the saddle again mikegalbicka's Avatar
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    10K on a rear is the best I have gotten out of the PR4's I run.

  3. #3
    In the first 250,000 miles Voni put on her R1100RS she averaged 8500 miles per tire front and rear.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  4. #4
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    It does sound about right but you have to take into account mileage varies a LOT rider to rider.
    - Some use the front brake a LOT more than the rear. They tend to wear tires evenly.
    - Some like to accelerate HARD on takeoff, others ease away. They tend to wear out rears quickly.
    - Some check their pressures EVERY time they ride. Their tires tend to last a bit longer as they avoid cupping and other problems that occur with incorrect pressures.
    - Some live in States like Oregon where chip seal roads are common. These and other rougher road surfaces use tires up faster
    - Some hardly ever ride their bikes and their tires get hard and cracked. This tends to affect mileage in a bad way as well.

    So those are just off the top of my head; I'm sure there's more. I note that Paul Glaves stated Voni's mileage as an average and that's the best way to look at it. Newer tires have really tough compounds used in the center region of tires now and this helps eek out more mileage which is a great improvement!
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    I note that Paul Glaves stated Voni's mileage as an average and that's the best way to look at it. Newer tires have really tough compounds used in the center region of tires now and this helps eek out more mileage which is a great improvement!
    Indeed. To elaborate, Voni used Battleax BT54 tires exclsuvely for the first 250,000 miles on her R1100RS. The average life front and rear was 8,500 miles. Front wear was fairly consistent. But on the rear she got a high of 14,100 miles and a low of 6,100 miles not counting any tire with an early life puncture.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  6. #6
    PR4's on the GT got 7k front and the rear likely had another 1K left.

    Heidenau K60 scouts on the GS1200 trip to Ak. last summer saw 8K on both with 1500 miles left on either when I just replaced them upon returning.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

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  7. #7
    Left Coast Rider
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    I think the word "typical" only applies to one rider - you. We all have different riding styles and what is typical for me may be far off what it might be for someone else. One thing you can be sure of though - new tires you can buy now are better than the tires from 3 years ago and you will "typically" get more mileage from them.

  8. #8
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    I think the word "typical" only applies to one rider - you. We all have different riding styles and what is typical for me may be far off what it might be for someone else. One thing you can be sure of though - new tires you can buy now are better than the tires from 3 years ago and you will "typically" get more mileage from them.
    That's what the manufacturers claim in order to justify higher tire prices. But my own experience suggests that tire mileage hasn't kept up to the propaganda. I have a buddy that has a very accurate gauge to test rubber density. Interestingly he has never been able to quantify any difference in hardness in any so called dual compound tires like Michelin or others. Make you wonder what real and whats propaganda. The tire prices we pay are quite real though.

  9. #9
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacque Jacque Shellacque View Post
    That's what the manufacturers claim in order to justify higher tire prices. But my own experience suggests that tire mileage hasn't kept up to the propaganda.
    My "typical" experience has been that the mileage improvements claimed are real.

    And I'm paying about the same or less than I did for tires 5 years ago.
    Last edited by BC1100S; 07-04-2019 at 02:06 AM.

  10. #10
    So riding style has a lot to do with what a rider needs for tires.

    I have a R1200RT but I will probably ride it more like an old man on a Harley, meaning not too fast, not to hot in the corners, but lots of miles. I'd really like to get more than a year out of a set of tires, so I need something that will go 15,000 or so miles a year. The Dunlop American Elites on my 900 pound Ultra Limited go that far year after year.

    I don't need a soft sport tire, but a more durable tire for these Texas shark-skin roads.

    What would you suggest?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by wichitagreg View Post
    So riding style has a lot to do with what a rider needs for tires.

    I have a R1200RT but I will probably ride it more like an old man on a Harley, meaning not too fast, not to hot in the corners, but lots of miles.
    Will you wear Crocs? Cause the guys I just passed today one of them was.

  12. #12
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    The road surface on which one rides is also a factor that contributes to tire wear. Chipped stone packed down by vehicles is harder on tires than asphalt.
    Walter

    "Sometimes I wonder if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it." Mark Twain

  13. #13
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalterK75 View Post
    The road surface on which one rides is also a factor that contributes to tire wear. Chipped stone packed down by vehicles is harder on tires than asphalt.
    For sure and add temperature to that.
    '
    Ufda happens..........

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  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GSAddict View Post
    For sure and add temperature to that.
    See post #5:

    Commuting to work in the fall, winter, and spring on machine laid asphalt vs July and August on course chip seal in the southwest.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    It does sound about right but you have to take into account mileage varies a LOT rider to rider.
    - Some use the front brake a LOT more than the rear. They tend to wear tires evenly.
    - Some like to accelerate HARD on takeoff, others ease away. They tend to wear out rears quickly.
    - Some check their pressures EVERY time they ride. Their tires tend to last a bit longer as they avoid cupping and other problems that occur with incorrect pressures.
    - Some live in States like Oregon where chip seal roads are common. These and other rougher road surfaces use tires up faster
    - Some hardly ever ride their bikes and their tires get hard and cracked. This tends to affect mileage in a bad way as well.

    So those are just off the top of my head; I'm sure there's more.
    Some riders are heavier than others, and some heavy riders also carry a lot of gear.

    It seems that weight plays a very large role in tire life, especially on the rear.

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