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Thread: Tires "Scalloped"

  1. #16
    Registered User VIEJO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobs_one View Post
    I've been running Michelin Pilot 5's on my 2014 RT for a year. Despite them "not being recommended" by Michelin for the RT, so far I've been very pleased. Apart from the road noise (which is noticeable) that others have mentioned they have worked well for me.

    I have 6,500 miles on them (which is pretty much all that I ever got out of Pilot 4's) and am about to head off for a trip for a week so I checked them out. I am pleased to say that there is plenty of tread depth left on them, but both the front and rear are really "scalloped". How does the scalloping affect the tire (other than increasing the above-mentioned road noise)?

    Am I good to ride with these until the tread wears, or does scalloping affect their traction and/or safety?

    My Pilot 4's usually ended up being scalloped towards the end of their lifetime, so I have been running my tire pressures +2psi over the recommended to "reduce" scalloping. It doesn't seem to have helped and/or may have made it worse?
    I have run Michelin PR 3's, 4's, and 5's on my '03K1200RS and until I ran the 5's I never had a front tire cup. I got about 9K from the 3's and 4's and 8200 on the 5's; the front tire cupping on the 5's only began during the last thousand miles. When I replaced the 5's the rear tire probably still had another thousand or so left on it but the front tire was on the wear bars.

    When I put the PR5's on I really wanted a set of GT5's but they weren't available yet. I queried Michelin several times as to what their weight break point was for fitting the GT5's vice the PR5's..... no answer. I replaced the PR5's with a set of Pirelli Angel GT "A" Spec's (if you need the Michelin GT then you need the "A" Spec Pirelli) at the recommendation of one of my BMW club's high mileage riders. I'm pushing 73 now and don't ride as aggressively as I used to so I'm looking more now for longevity than absolute grip in a tire (while still having enough grip for occasional visits to the edge).

    Regarding tire pressure: When your increase your tire pressure from the manufacturer's recommendation you are decreasing your contact patch... are a few extra miles worth a loss of grip? Remember to adjust the recommended "cold" pressure of your tires for ambient temperature. A good rule of thumb is to increase the recommended pressure by one (1) psi for every ten (10) degrees F over 70F. It was 100F in my shed late yesterday afternoon when I checked my tires for today's breakfast ride so I increased 36psi F/42psi R to 39psi F/45psi R.

    Tire choice is probably the most subjective part of equipping a motorcycle. From my perspective unless you are a very aggressive sport rider go for all the sidewall stiffness available. If you stay with the Michelins definitely consider the GT5's over the PR5's.

    Yes, scalloping affects the performance of the whole motorcycle and not just the tires, especially on a bike loaded to travel. A scalloped tire(s) causes the suspension to work harder which in turn aggravates the scalloping while degrading the handling characteristics of the bike.

    As for the trip.... the difference between "probably ok" and "good to go" is up to you.

    Truth be told I would imagine most of us have overridden a set of tires at one time or another (with widely varying results/stories!).

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by VIEJO View Post
    It was 100F in my shed late yesterday afternoon when I checked my tires for today's breakfast ride so I increased 36psi F/42psi R to 39psi F/45psi R.
    At ANY ambient temperature, I believe your rear tire is now over-inflated.

    PLUS,

    Was it 100F this morning when you went for your breakfast ride?

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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    At ANY ambient temperature, I believe your rear tire is now over-inflated.

    PLUS,

    Was it 100F this morning when you went for your breakfast ride?

    https://motorcycle.michelinman.com/m...-for-motorbike
    VIEJO followed the recommended procedure for temperature calibration to 68 ambient so his 45psi is where it should be for an ambient of 100F in his garage. Return to ~68F and voila psi will then be right around 42. Were he to set psi to 42 at 100F ambient he would then be ~39psi at 68F ambient so would be under-inflated which is the universally suggested worse condition than what you're suggesting.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    VIEJO followed the recommended procedure for temperature calibration to 68 ambient so his 45psi is where it should be for an ambient of 100F in his garage. Return to ~68F and voila psi will then be right around 42. Were he to set psi to 42 at 100F ambient he would then be ~39psi at 68F ambient so would be under-inflated which is the universally suggested worse condition than what you're suggesting.
    Sorry, you're wrong. Did you even read the link I included?

    One inflates one's tires dependent upon the ambient temperatures in which you are running. If one is running in 100F temps then one might inflate one's tires to 42 psi or whatever the bike's manufacturer recommends. If the next day one is running in 68F temperatures, the tire pressures should then be adjusted (cold) for that temperature.

    But....you can do whatever it is you like.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Sorry, you're wrong. Did you even read the link I included?

    One inflates one's tires dependent upon the ambient temperatures in which you are running. If one is running in 100F temps then one might inflate one's tires to 42 psi or whatever the bike's manufacturer recommends. If the next day one is running in 68F temperatures, the tire pressures should then be adjusted (cold) for that temperature.

    But....you can do whatever it is you like.
    If you set the correct cold pressure at 20C (68F) and none leaks out the pressure will remain correct as the tire heats up and cools down. If you set the adjusted pressure per the chart at ambient 100F if temps cool down to 68 by morning you will find the recommended pressure within 1 psi. And that goes for any increased or decreased temperature.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    If you set the correct cold pressure at 20C (68F) and none leaks out the pressure will remain correct as the tire heats up and cools down. If you set the adjusted pressure per the chart at ambient 100F if temps cool down to 68 by morning you will find the recommended pressure within 1 psi. And that goes for any increased or decreased temperature.
    Just so I'm clear on this, as it's been discussed a few times in various threads.

    If my garage temp is 100 degrees, I should be setting my tires pressures according to the chart instead of putting them at 36/42 as I've been doing? I should be setting them at 39/45? And conversely, if it's 40 in the garage, I'd be dialing in 33/39?

    Thanks, I thought from other threads that I was supposed to ignore the chart and just set recommended cold temp pressure.
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Sorry, you're wrong. Did you even read the link I included?

    One inflates one's tires dependent upon the ambient temperatures in which you are running. If one is running in 100F temps then one might inflate one's tires to 42 psi or whatever the bike's manufacturer recommends. If the next day one is running in 68F temperatures, the tire pressures should then be adjusted (cold) for that temperature.

    But....you can do whatever it is you like.
    I read the link, and it clearly does not say what you advocate. The tire pressures in the manual or on the tire are based on 68 degrees and the tire being cold. A hot tire and a cold tire in an ambient condition of 100 degrees are going to have significantly different pressure indications.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Sorry, you're wrong. Did you even read the link I included?

    One inflates one's tires dependent upon the ambient temperatures in which you are running. If one is running in 100F temps then one might inflate one's tires to 42 psi or whatever the bike's manufacturer recommends. If the next day one is running in 68F temperatures, the tire pressures should then be adjusted (cold) for that temperature.

    But....you can do whatever it is you like.
    Yes I did--the information provided is incomplete and misleading, which is why you're misled about this. The problem is that tires must be able to accommodate huge swings in ambient temperature in the course of all possible rides one can take, and tires must be able to cope with that. Now if you lived in a steady state temperature of 100F all the time, I think you should be fine to set pressure to 42/36, but that is not what happens in the real world. For example In our ride to St George UT a few years back we left at 58F, and arrived at 112.9F. Had we parked the bike for 2h in that temp, then adjusted PSI to 42/36, by the time we got back up to elevation and evening ambient was back down to 50F and our tires then would have been under-inflated to around 36/30, which for a 650 lb bike would have not particularly safe for the loads involved.

    Google the idea and you will see VIEJO followed the recommended procedure for setting tire pressure-adjust by 1 psi for every 10 degrees +/- 68F ambient.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    Google the idea and you will see VIEJO followed the recommended procedure for setting tire pressure-adjust by 1 psi for every 10 degrees +/- 68F ambient.
    I appreciate your response and I will agree that up to the MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED PRESSURE embossed on the sidewall, your idea has merit. I neglected to state this in my first response .

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkpilot View Post
    I read the link, and it clearly does not say what you advocate.
    The comment in that link is ambiguous because it does not say what 'adjustments' are which is in this statement: "Ensure that you make adjustments if you take the pressure after riding, i.e. with "hot" tires." The adjustment they are referring to but don't state is: +/- 1 psi for every 10 degrees F from 68F.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    Just so I'm clear on this, as it's been discussed a few times in various threads.

    If my garage temp is 100 degrees, I should be setting my tires pressures according to the chart instead of putting them at 36/42 as I've been doing? I should be setting them at 39/45? And conversely, if it's 40 in the garage, I'd be dialing in 33/39?
    That is correct.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    That is correct.
    Thank you sir.

    I started a post some time back on this and most people discounted the idea. I'm going back to the chart airing up the tires.
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