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Thread: R1200RT - Riding Gear for Hot Weather

  1. #16
    BMW MOA co-founder bmwdean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RYD1WD View Post
    On long days in high temps, mesh will defeat the purpose... it dries you out too fast, you lose a lot of the benefit of evaporative cooling, and you can't produce enough sweat in a non-aerobic state to keep up with the air exchange. It's a lot like tossing yourself in a convection oven when the heat index climbs north of 90 degrees.

    I have an interesting article written by Tom Austin for Iron Butt Mag in 2010, and the power point presentation I developed for doing clinics on core temp management that I'll be happy to share with anyone who asks, just shoot me an email: greg.north@bmw-ducati.com

    This makes sense. I try to avoid riding in really hot weather but I have noticed when it is really hot it is time to close vents and helmet shield to avoid the oven. Of course an evaporative cooling vest or flannel shirt soaked in water helps, but not if using a vented jacked, which dries them out way too vast. And high humidity defeats a vest.

    The Veskimo (https://www.veskimo.com/), now discontinued, does place cooling water against your torso and some riders love it, but it is not easy to use. If I HAD to ride a long distance in high heat I would probably plug in my Veskimo and keep getting ice into its large cooler strapped on the back seat.

    I am waiting for an efficient electric coolong vest or jacket for motorcycles, if one ever comes on the market.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooling_vest

    Here is the summary from the LDR iron-butt article:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by bmwdean; 05-21-2019 at 05:51 PM.
    Jeff Dean
    Tucson, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin
    Co-founder, 1972, of BMW MOA -- http://bmwdean.com/r1200rtw.htm
    2017 R1200RT, 2019 R1250RT, 1967 R60/2

  2. #17
    Registered User dlong's Avatar
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    Here's another option for a shorter shield that is moderately priced between the BMW sport shield and the CalSci option:

    https://europeantoysstore.com/produc...1200rt-lc-2014

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkypete View Post
    I have recently completed a 19,500km circumnavigation of Australia, during which I encountered weeks of temperatures between 35 -38 degrees C (95-101F) every day while crossing the north of the continent. My RT has an aftermarket touring screen and airflow around my body is is minimal. I wear an RST Ventilator V Jacket, which is a mesh jacket with a removable waterproof liner, kevlar lined jeans, full length Alpinestars boots for protection, and mesh gloves with hard knuckle protection. This worked realy well for me, and if the weather turns really hot, I will wet my shirt under the jacket and the airflow keeps me cooler for up to 90 minutes. It's important to keep drinking lots or water, lots of distance riders in Australia wear a Camelbak.

    Here's a link to a really good article about riding in hot weather. http://www.ironbutt.com/ibmagazine/i..._62-66_hot.pdf

    If the weather turns cold and wet, I'll put the liner in the RST jacket, put on a jumper, and perhaps wear a fully waterproof overjacket and pants.
    Finally managed to read the article. Thanks again, for posting the link.

    That now leaves the question what jacket to wear. We already know that the fairing and shield on the RT keep a good amount of wind away from our bodies. If I understand the arguments in the article correctly, given the reduced wind behind the shield may still make wearing a mesh jacket an option. However, if that is still too much evaporation for the body to compensate with re-hydration, then what alternatives would there be? Non-mesh jackets with venting? What examples of a good jacket matching that requirement are there?

  4. #19
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    I have run mesh for years, and swear by it. I carry water on the bike so I drink constantly. I have tried to use a "normal" vented jacket and got so hot I thought I was gonna die! Mesh and lots of water works for me. I might wear a long sleeve tshirt underneath. I rode through Texas a few years ago, temps were 105 - 110F. Wore the mesh and drank a lot of water.

    A couple times when water was available I hosed myself down so I was dripping with water when I rode away. It lasts for 1/2 - 3/4 hour.

  5. #20
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    The best isn't cheap but it's the best https://www.motoport.com/product/ult...r-mesh-jacket/ I got the pants too.

    Jay

  6. #21
    Registered User alegerlotz's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention that I wear wicking liners under my mesh gear (and cooling vest if I'm wearing one). They help with the evaporative cooling and keep the mesh gear from sticking to my skin and bunching up.
    2016 R1200RT
    2007 KTM 450 XC-W (10/17 - 5/18)
    2005 R1200RT (2/2015 - 12/2016)
    1985 Yamaha XJ 700 Maxim (7/1989 - 9/1991)

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by strataj View Post
    The best isn't cheap but it's the best https://www.motoport.com/product/ult...r-mesh-jacket/ I got the pants too.

    Jay
    You're not kidding about the "cheap" part! :-D I am trying to imagine how the conversation with my wife is going to go... She'd want a set, too, of course!

  8. #23
    Registered User alegerlotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbtex View Post
    You're not kidding about the "cheap" part! :-D I am trying to imagine how the conversation with my wife is going to go... She'd want a set, too, of course!
    In my experience, there's no substitute for good quality gear, especially if you're going to commute or ride often. Also, next to the money you spent on the bike(s), good gear is a mere fraction.

    If budget is an issue right now because the recent bike purchases, you can get decent stuff from Revzilla (and other places) and use that for a couple of years before deciding to invest in something custom like the mesh suits or aerostich. My advise would be to avoid some of the very low priced items unless they're heavily discounted because of something like a close out. Some of the super cheap stuff will disintegrate after a couple of uses; there are no shortage of reviews on motorcycle gear, so you can usually figure out what's good and what's junk from reading those.

    Good Luck
    2016 R1200RT
    2007 KTM 450 XC-W (10/17 - 5/18)
    2005 R1200RT (2/2015 - 12/2016)
    1985 Yamaha XJ 700 Maxim (7/1989 - 9/1991)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by alegerlotz View Post
    In my experience, there's no substitute for good quality gear, especially if you're going to commute or ride often. Also, next to the money you spent on the bike(s), good gear is a mere fraction.

    If budget is an issue right now because the recent bike purchases, you can get decent stuff from Revzilla (and other places) and use that for a couple of years before deciding to invest in something custom like the mesh suits or aerostich. My advise would be to avoid some of the very low priced items unless they're heavily discounted because of something like a close out. Some of the super cheap stuff will disintegrate after a couple of uses; there are no shortage of reviews on motorcycle gear, so you can usually figure out what's good and what's junk from reading those.

    Good Luck
    Oh, don't mistake my comment about the prices as unwillingness to purchase quality equipment or an inability to put it in the budget. We have already made significant investments in riding gear and will continue to do so.

    My wife and I are newcomers to riding and getting accustomed to the cost of it is just part of the learning experience. We have never shied away from paying for quality. One of the reasons why we made the step up to the RTs.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Both my wife and I wear Klim Induction short gloves in hot weather.
    We have the previous generation of the glove.
    The big thing we like is the narrow short cuff allows air to get up our sleeves on our RSs.
    Not sure if you'll be able to get air up your sleeves on a RT.

    Here's a review of the current Klim Induction short glove.
    Good suggestion! We tried the Klim Mojave Pro. My wife is keeping hers. For some reason the 2XL I ordered were still very tight and leaving impression marks on my hands. I have large hands, but those felt more like an LG or XL at best. I might try the Induction next.

    How's the air flow with them?

  11. #26
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbtex View Post
    Good suggestion! We tried the Klim Mojave Pro. My wife is keeping hers. For some reason the 2XL I ordered were still very tight and leaving impression marks on my hands. I have large hands, but those felt more like an LG or XL at best. I might try the Induction next.

    How's the air flow with them?
    The last generation short Induction gloves ran one size small for both of us.
    I have last generation Klim Element gloves in XL and needed XXL in the short Induction gloves.
    Debbie has Klim Induction long gloves in Large and needed XL in the short Induction gloves.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  12. #27
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    So, taking the article posted earlier into consideration, and the suggestions various posters made so far, here's what I gathered:

    Above 93F degrees air temperature, sitting behind the fairing and windshield on the RT, the best way to deal with the heat is to wear a mesh jacket with a cooling vest underneath. That makes sense, as the vest takes care of the convection evaporative effect so the hot wind does not contribute to the dehydrating effect (as much) on the skin/body. For that matter, if a stronger cooling effect is desired, keep the windshield down and re-charge the cooling vest more often to keep the evaporating effect going.

    Loved the summary picture posted earlier, so I did some OCR text conversion on it for esier copying. Here it is:

    In Summary
    The magic number is 93. Below 93F, it's fairly easy to stay cool on a motorcycle as long as you are moving fast enough to get some wind against your skin for convective cooling. A mesh riding suit feels great.

    Above 93F, it's a different world. The wind is no longer your friend.

    For long distance riding in temperature higher than 93F, you need to:

    1. Minimize your body's exposure to direct wind blast.
    2. Wear wicking undergarments, including a helmet liner.
    3. Carry an adequate supply of cool water and drink frequently.
    4. Insulate any parts of your body exposed to engine heat or radiator discharge.

    Dress right, drink right, and enjoy the ride.

  13. #28
    Registered User alegerlotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbtex View Post
    So, taking the article posted earlier into consideration, and the suggestions various posters made so far, here's what I gathered:

    Above 93F degrees air temperature, sitting behind the fairing and windshield on the RT, the best way to deal with the heat is to wear a mesh jacket with a cooling vest underneath. That makes sense, as the vest takes care of the convection evaporative effect so the hot wind does not contribute to the dehydrating effect (as much) on the skin/body. For that matter, if a stronger cooling effect is desired, keep the windshield down and re-charge the cooling vest more often to keep the evaporating effect going.

    Loved the summary picture posted earlier, so I did some OCR text conversion on it for esier copying. Here it is:

    In Summary
    The magic number is 93. Below 93F, it's fairly easy to stay cool on a motorcycle as long as you are moving fast enough to get some wind against your skin for convective cooling. A mesh riding suit feels great.

    Above 93F, it's a different world. The wind is no longer your friend.

    For long distance riding in temperature higher than 93F, you need to:

    1. Minimize your body's exposure to direct wind blast.
    2. Wear wicking undergarments, including a helmet liner.
    3. Carry an adequate supply of cool water and drink frequently.
    4. Insulate any parts of your body exposed to engine heat or radiator discharge.

    Dress right, drink right, and enjoy the ride.
    Good Summary!
    2016 R1200RT
    2007 KTM 450 XC-W (10/17 - 5/18)
    2005 R1200RT (2/2015 - 12/2016)
    1985 Yamaha XJ 700 Maxim (7/1989 - 9/1991)

  14. #29
    Since this thread is about riding an R1200RT fully faired bike I'll agree that mesh may be appropriate. But I would caution riders of bikes with less wind protection to be very careful because in the wind on a hot day mesh can kill you.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Since this thread is about riding an R1200RT fully faired bike I'll agree that mesh may be appropriate. But I would caution riders of bikes with less wind protection to be very careful because in the wind on a hot day mesh can kill you.
    That's a great point, Paul!

    I took the bikes in yesterday to get them inspected for registration purposes, and one of the techs at the inspection station struck up a conversation about the RT, specifically about the shield. He pointed to his Harley that he had just installed his windshield that morning because the weather forecast was saying we would get rain and he didn't want to get wet. Not sure what gear he wears when he's out riding, but it looked like he didn't have any beyond wearing his t-shirt. Besides the obvious ATGATT point, he didn't strike me as taking his Harley out for long tours, so trying to explain to him why we would want to have the fairing and the windshield on the RT even in the hot Texas summer months produced some quizzical looks and remarks.

    The point is that there is so much more to riding motorcycles than I would have imagined when we first started. It is quite enlightening getting all the input, and I certainly appreciate the knowledge and insights!

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