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Thread: Rear Brake failure 2018 RT

  1. #1

    Rear Brake failure 2018 RT

    I have a 2018 Rt with 12500km on it. I was out Thursday for a 200km ride ,when I got home I could smell something odd. I checked the bike and found the rear rotor was extremely hot. Tried turning the rear wheel and it was binding on the brake caliper. Luckliy I had a service appointment booked for the next day. The service tech noted the following.

    brake pedal has almost no travel
    rear brake rotor showed signs of over heating
    rear brake pads were falling apart along the top edges,surfaces were well worn
    cleaned rotor
    serviced caliper
    replaced rear brake pads n/c
    backed off "blow by" adjustment to rear master cylinder
    bled rear brake and replaced fluid
    cycled abs pump

    The rear wheel is now turning freely , I rode it home and all appears normal.

    I am wondering if anyone out there has had a similar experience.

  2. #2
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdeluca View Post
    I have a 2018 Rt with 12500km on it. I was out Thursday for a 200km ride ,when I got home I could smell something odd. I checked the bike and found the rear rotor was extremely hot. Tried turning the rear wheel and it was binding on the brake caliper. Luckliy I had a service appointment booked for the next day. The service tech noted the following.

    brake pedal has almost no travel
    rear brake rotor showed signs of over heating
    rear brake pads were falling apart along the top edges,surfaces were well worn
    cleaned rotor
    serviced caliper
    replaced rear brake pads n/c
    backed off "blow by" adjustment to rear master cylinder
    bled rear brake and replaced fluid
    cycled abs pump

    The rear wheel is now turning freely , I rode it home and all appears normal.

    I am wondering if anyone out there has had a similar experience.
    This happens more than you think on rear brakes. When this happens you must bleed out the brakes, even disassemble the brake lines is needed. Why? Because you donít know if a piece of debris is in the line that has retreated, but will return into the return orifice. The brake fluid must be completely flushed out because it has exceeded its boiling point and has flashed to a vapor. The caliper dust boot and seals must also be replaced because of the temperature of the seal was exceeded when the fluid vapored. Although it may look like you donít need to replace what I have listed. You have exceeded the temperature limits of all that I have mentioned and reduced the life and reliability of those parts. A knowledgeable tech would have done what I have described

    You were lucky. Iíve seen rear brakes actually catch on fire, dump the rider on the street.

    Check your foot calibration and the position of your pedal. Make sure your foot is off of the brake pedal when riding, a common mistake that starts the process of overheating and accidentally boils the fluid.


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  3. #3
    Registered User natrab's Avatar
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    Sep 2012
    Location
    Antioch, CA
    Posts
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    I haven't had it happen, but I've seen a lot of overfilled brakes reservoirs (from topping off as the pads wear) as well as dragging brake pads for various reason (one guy glued on a metal backing to them...). I have bought most of my bikes used, so I always check for these things when I get them. Probably doesn't apply to your case though.

    Either way, part of my pre-ride check is always to make sure the wheels spin freely and the brakes aren't dragging.
    Current rides:
    2016 R1200RT Ebony Metallic - 12k miles
    2012 R1200GS Rallye - 18k miles
    Previous BMWs: 2013 R1200RT 90th, 2011 R1200RT-P, 2007 R1200S, 2006 R1200RT

  4. #4
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by natrab View Post
    I haven't had it happen, but I've seen a lot of overfilled brakes reservoirs (from topping off as the pads wear) as well as dragging brake pads for various reason (one guy glued on a metal backing to them...). I have bought most of my bikes used, so I always check for these things when I get them. Probably doesn't apply to your case though.

    Either way, part of my pre-ride check is always to make sure the wheels spin freely and the brakes aren't dragging.
    Oh yes, keeping an air gap in the brake reservoir is very necessary. Especially check after installing new brake pads. On a Used bike purchase you definitely need to make sure the fluid is below the top line.


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