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Thread: Developing Trade and Technical skills in America

  1. #16
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Spend about $3 at the iTunes store or similar and download the episode of Dan Rather Reports titled "The German Jobs Machine." In Germany, it's decided at 10 yrs/4th grade whether you are college or trade school material. Pretty economically successful country ... in fact if you visit, you may conclude you've come from a 3rd world country.
    Kent Christensen
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    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  2. #17
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    A problem I see is the fickleness of the employers in these fields.
    When I entered the job market in the 70s it was not uncommon for employers to take in rookies, both with and without college degrees, and train them accordingly to fill the jobs openings they had. But when employers were less hungry, like after the 2008 Bush recession, that willingness to train apprentices went out the window. Employers could find experienced job hunters so gave up on their training programs.
    The inability to count on those apprentice programs being available forces young people make other decisions.

  3. #18
    Rally Rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffDiCarlo View Post
    A problem I see is the fickleness of the employers in these fields.
    When I entered the job market in the 70s it was not uncommon for employers to take in rookies, both with and without college degrees, and train them accordingly to fill the jobs openings they had. But when employers were less hungry, like after the 2008 Bush recession, that willingness to train apprentices went out the window. Employers could find experienced job hunters so gave up on their training programs.
    The inability to count on those apprentice programs being available forces young people make other decisions.
    In addition the willingness to cut staff and outsource at a whim has damaged the reputation of many fields. For example, as an engineer I would not advise anyone to go into that field, as a engineer that also used to program (embedded software) I would advise anyone to go into that field either. And I survived the downturns successfully and I am still an engineer. If I had it to do over, I think prosthetics and orthothodics would be a wonderful career field.

    I am convinced that the majority of executive management just wants money for nothing, and is incapable of leading a manufacturing company.

    Rod

  4. #19
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    Yeah, what Rod said.
    I ended my engineering career in my 50s primarily because of management decisions to continually move operations to areas with cheaper labor costs. Invariably, their decisions failed to return the promised profit boon.
    But given the good run I had, I'm still reluctant to say I wouldn't recommend engineering to youngsters today. There are just a lot of caveats that would go with it.

  5. #20
    It is called the "gig economy" for a reason. Short term employment. As few benefits as the law allows. No loyalty from or to the company. Everything for the next quarter so the CEO can get his bonus. No regard for the longer range. It is a downward spiral. I am very happy I am retired and pity the folks just entering the work force. We are on the path of economic failure. Long live the billionaires who buy $350 million dollar yachts, and sorry sucker but you need to be looking for another job.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  6. #21
    When i started life outside the comforts of mom and pops, I was a stupid know nothing minimum wage earner with no degree and worked in multiple hands on jobs.

    By 2002 I started a degree, earned it, and moved upward to become a supervisor in county government.
    so I still know nothing and get paid for it...

    But seriously, I am still a long time believer in working upwards.

    The college degree thing was a push by the feds in the early 1990's for the newly revamped student loan program.

    it was a cash cow and led to multiple degrees in nothing.

    As a previous poster noted... plumbing.

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