Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: Developing Trade and Technical skills in America

  1. #1
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    13,756

    Developing Trade and Technical skills in America

    I was watching one of my favorite shows recently- Ship Shape TV- http://shipshapetv.com Not that I have a boat but I do have the next most troublesome toy- A Motorhome
    In this episode they highlighted an organization called Skills USA- https://www.skillsusa.org This is an organization that encourages and promotes training for young people that are interested in working with their "hands".

    Here is an overview of the 2018 competition held at the Louisville Expo Facility-



    If you have some skills- share them

    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  2. #2
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    CENTEX USA
    Posts
    10,253
    Have noticed a lot more trades advertising apprenticeship/career opportunities here on local broadcasts. There definitely is a need for the trades and a few high school efforts funded in part by grants to introduce youth to another productive and monetarily satisfying career.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  3. #3
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Sugar Valley, Ga
    Posts
    1,968
    Education, the world of, from k through 16 needs to get the picture. Banished were working with one's hands to, learn computer skills and one doesn't need to know or learn to use one's hands to make a living or vocation. There after we have raised a generation of students that can't read a tape, ruler, or actually use fractions. For me, it is more than grants and that kind of thinking; but to banish this thought process that is going on in the schools now: science, engineering, and math. Yes, there is a need for these folks but for most, it's your hands, common sense derived from working with those hands, and get rid of the "exclusivity" of becoming an engineer...….God bless these USA.....Dennis

  4. #4
    Registered User jandhumphreyme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Central Maine
    Posts
    423
    I think there is a need for both skills, hands on and computer. That said, I believe that young children could benefit far more from the "old timey" shop class of yesterday, than the time they now spend behind a computer screen. These classes taught problem solving, mastering basic coordination, working with equipment, thinking through projects on a step by step basis, patience, and perseverance. They also encourage pride in one's overall ability a sense of accomplishment at the completion of a project. There is plenty of time in the later grades to master computer skills. I've meet way too many engineers who could doodle in differential equations but not have the reasoning ability to apply their training to real world situations, don't believe it ask some mechanic's who have to fix some of their brilliant designs.
    So often times it happens that we live our lives in chains
    And we never even know we have the key

  5. #5
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    CENTEX USA
    Posts
    10,253
    H forwarded this to me today..LMAO

    IMG_3224.JPG



    I came through an apprenticeship program and had this discussion a few times over the years as I moved thru management ranks after I slowed the pole climbing some. The engineers saw no humor having me as their supervisor either. Was told more than once I hadn't paid my dues
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  6. #6
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nibley, UT USA
    Posts
    1,072
    “The society that values its philosophers more highly than its plumbers shall soon have neither good philosophy nor good plumbing”

    While John Dewey had a point, it wasn’t that we shouldn’t have philosophers. As with most things in life, balance adds richness. Better we should find a way for both philosophers AND plumbers to acquire the skills and training they need without a crushing burden of debt.

    Best,
    DG
    Last edited by GTRider; 01-25-2019 at 05:29 AM.
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST — 1984 R80 G/S PD — 1993 R100GS — 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C — 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    gig harborr ,wa
    Posts
    727
    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    H forwarded this to me today..LMAO

    IMG_3224.JPG



    I came through an apprenticeship program and had this discussion a few times over the years as I moved thru management ranks after I slowed the pole climbing some. The engineers saw no humor having me as their supervisor either. Was told more than once I hadn't paid my dues
    I was an inside electrician for 35 years with an apprenticeship program. Yes I did paid me dues!

  8. #8
    "If as a culture and society we come upon a fork in the road, we need to take both paths."

    Me: 2019
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  9. #9
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    2,058
    My best class in high school was shop class. I went straight into an apprenticeship in auto mechanics after leaving school and earned my ticket in four years. I worked in that trade for another five years before changing careers to firefighting. The trade ticket was worth a lot in getting hired as a firefighter (as well as several years of volunteer fire service time) and I continued to practice that trade part time for several years more. The knowledge and skills have proven invaluable over my lifetime and have saved me countless thousands of dollars by being capable of repairing not just autos but most any machine we own.

    I do agree more youth need to be directed towards trades as career paths. I believe our societies need to give trades much more respect. I recall while still in high school and even when in my apprenticeship that trades were only recommended as a last resort for the individual who had "little chance for much success in life". Contrary to that attitude, trades need smart hard working people who are able to learn and understand complex issues and systems and trades-persons deserve to be seen as the skilled and intelligent people they are.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  10. #10
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nibley, UT USA
    Posts
    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    "If as a culture and society we come upon a fork in the road, we need to take both paths."

    Me: 2019
    You can do that, since you’re always riding with Voni!


    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST — 1984 R80 G/S PD — 1993 R100GS — 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C — 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  11. #11
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    13,756
    Steve, that was perfect.

    Average age of an electrician or plumber here in Mass- 57. They are doing quite well.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  12. #12
    Rich Pelton Rich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Killdeer, ND
    Posts
    1,452
    I'm in my 40th and final year as an electrician. I served all those years in the oil & gas industry. Good electricians are tough to find, young ones even harder. In small town ND you struggle to find an electrician or plumber, the good ones are extremely busy and will get to you when they get to you, if they take the job at all.

    When a youngster asks me for career advice, I always say plumber, electrician, or the HVAC industry. It's only going to get more lucrative for them as time goes by.

  13. #13
    Registered User jandhumphreyme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Central Maine
    Posts
    423
    Average age of construction workers at our company is around 53 or so ... Been attending way to many retirement party's in the last couple of years. Mine's three to five years out (three per financial planner, five by my wife's spending), there's 12 years difference between myself and the next youngest guy in my dept. Got some young fire-pissers but no field experience to speak of.
    So often times it happens that we live our lives in chains
    And we never even know we have the key

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post

    When a youngster asks me for career advice, I always say plumber, electrician, or the HVAC industry. It's only going to get more lucrative for them as time goes by.
    Either schools are not teaching the basics such as general math, or they are passing the students without making sure they know what is being taught. You cannot depend on a computer for simple common sense & reasoning. Twenty years ago, we had a young man working for us in our business. He was a high school graduate but could not use a ruler. It is sad. You have to know some basic math to do any of these jobs.
    Gail Thorne
    2017 F700GS

  15. #15
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    CENTEX USA
    Posts
    10,253
    Probably a little of both Gail.
    Having run the linemans training a few years before I retired, basic math skills are needed and we were surprised at some of the levels of comprehension between recent high school new hires. Some school districts are more successful. My mom and grandmother were teachers, another thread another time.

    A group of us formally trained IBEW certified linemen pushed apprentice training into the city owned utility for years after we moved there After several accidents/deaths in a short time finally gave it the priority and funding we had been urging .Sad we had to lose people to make a change.

    It was a typical son of a son and friend hiring pattern before this and we found several non readers and ruler challenged amongst the OJT and uncle "trained" and holding journeyman level positions...maddening. We got tutoring help for several and put everyone through basic math and electricity. Some just retired as the changes were passing them by.
    The current electrical worker there gets a lot of book time and either progresses thru the three year program or find another career path early.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

Similar Threads

  1. Are rider skills becoming obsolete?
    By OldCamper in forum Motorrad
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 11-14-2017, 11:40 PM
  2. Road America Street Skills 2 Course review
    By skibumwi in forum Motorrad
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-02-2017, 11:46 PM
  3. developing problem with 5th gear downshift
    By rt_austin in forum F-Twins
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-20-2011, 01:51 AM
  4. Slow skills/dry clutch
    By chord97 in forum Oilheads
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-05-2007, 04:40 PM
  5. Adventure Camping Skills?
    By mika in forum Campfire
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 12-27-2005, 07:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •