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Thread: R1200RT Tire pressure

  1. #1
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    R1200RT Tire pressure

    I tried searching but really couldn't narrow it down enough. Reading the owners manual the indicated tire pressure seems low, 31.9 cold single rider front, 36.3 cold single rider rear. Is anybody using these pressures? If not, what are you running for normal riding?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anchorbend View Post
    I tried searching but really couldn't narrow it down enough. Reading the owners manual the indicated tire pressure seems low, 31.9 cold single rider front, 36.3 cold single rider rear. Is anybody using these pressures? If not, what are you running for normal riding?
    TOO LOW!!! Try 42 rear, 36 front

  3. #3
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
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    36/42 is closer to the mark. I tend to run about 34/42. But that reads 36/44 on my buddy's gauge. Start at 36/42-44 with a good gauge and see how you like it.
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '10 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

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    Thumbs up

    38 / 42
    Last edited by Greenwald; 02-26-2012 at 09:23 PM.

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    35/40 With no bags and single rider works best for me.
    Marty
    O6 RT, 03 F650GS

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    Registered User gfspencer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anchorbend View Post
    I tried searching but really couldn't narrow it down enough. Reading the owners manual the indicated tire pressure seems low, 31.9 cold single rider front, 36.3 cold single rider rear. Is anybody using these pressures? If not, what are you running for normal riding?
    Consider how much do you weigh and how much do you carry. Raise the tire pressures as your total weight goes up. I usually run 36/42. I weigh 190 and tend to carry a bunch of "stuff".

    Not all tire pressure gauges are equal. Some are much better than others. Invest in a good one.

    If you have a Tire Pressure Monitoring system remember that it is a monitoring system and not a tire pressure gauge. It's there to tell you if a tire is going flat. The TPM on my bike matches my tire pressure gauge. The TPM on my car is about 3 PSI off.
    2015 R nineT

  7. #7
    Here we go again. Why would you use different pressures than the ones recommended by BMW for the bike they build? Don't BMW know what they're talking about? This had me puzzled for some time on different forums.

    Can somebody offer a good explanation, other than their ?˝feeling???

    Thank you.

  8. #8
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Sure. Easy to explain. If you are on the tire BMW tested on the bike, and meet the specs for the design - for example, optimum weight, load, suspension settings and average riding characteristics, average road surface and design characteristics, average temp and humidity and had no expectations of performance vs handling - follow the BMW spec.

    Not very many riders actually fit all that so they test different tires, different pressures under different loads and riding characteristics and determine what they want out of a tire. Performance [power to the ground under heavy throttle]? Braking? Handling? Long life? Performance with a passenger? Solo?

    All that comes into the equasion.

    I ride PR3s. I carry a fuel cell that is much like a light passenger, rear top box with moderate load and solo. For normal distance travel. I set front and rear at 40psi. I check/set pressures cold every day I ride. If I'm going to head to the mountains for a play day, I drop to 36F and 38R for maximum warming and the best stiction my tires can give me. The next day, I adjust for what my ride is going to be.

    I've gotten as high as just over 13,000 miles out of a set of PR3s and as low as 9200 mile sout of the rear PR3 [during the IBR] but still retained the front PR3 to 11300 miles when I swapped both front and rear.

    All depends on your riding style, tire selection and what you want out of the tire.
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveAikens View Post
    Sure. Easy to explain. If you are on the tire BMW tested on the bike, and meet the specs for the design - for example, optimum weight, load, suspension settings and average riding characteristics, average road surface and design characteristics, average temp and humidity and had no expectations of performance vs handling - follow the BMW spec.

    Not very many riders actually fit all that so they test different tires, different pressures under different loads and riding characteristics and determine what they want out of a tire. Performance [power to the ground under heavy throttle]? Braking? Handling? Long life? Performance with a passenger? Solo?

    All that comes into the equasion.

    I ride PR3s. I carry a fuel cell that is much like a light passenger, rear top box with moderate load and solo. For normal distance travel. I set front and rear at 40psi. I check/set pressures cold every day I ride. If I'm going to head to the mountains for a play day, I drop to 36F and 38R for maximum warming and the best stiction my tires can give me. The next day, I adjust for what my ride is going to be.

    I've gotten as high as just over 13,000 miles out of a set of PR3s and as low as 9200 mile sout of the rear PR3 [during the IBR] but still retained the front PR3 to 11300 miles when I swapped both front and rear.

    All depends on your riding style, tire selection and what you want out of the tire.
    Okay. Thank you. So, that means you should change tire pressure almost on a daily basis, according to the numerous circumstances you mention. Not feasible, right? So, there has got to be a kind of ?˝in-beteween?? pressure that should do for almost all occasions except, maybe, for extremes, like track on one hand and long distance two-up touring with luggage on the other. Also, why does everybody seem to have settled for much higher pressures than BMW recommended's regardless of conditions?

    Why that high? I still do not get it. I'd love to hear every rider who uses higher pressures tell me exactly why they do it.

  10. #10
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Depending on the tire, higher pressures do two things most riders are concerned about.

    One is it has been proven to increase treadlife on some dual compound tires.

    More importanly, the higher the pressues, the more protection from damage to the rims in the event you hit something in the road, pothole, junk that falls off a vehicle in front of you, that kind of thing.

    As to changing pressures every time you ride - that is not what I said. What I said was I check pressures every morning before I ride. Generally, there's no to very little change so all I'm doing is make sure the pressure is where I want it and there's no damage to the tire, as well as checking tread life.

    I know a lot of riders that don't check pressures often or even at all unless the bike is in for service. That's their choice. I started riding in 1956 and was taught early on that tire condition is all that's between me and the road. Where it's true tire technology has made dramatic improvements, there's no way temperatures and elevation don't play a part in air pressures. My routine is to check every day I ride. It's worked for me for a long time and I've never had a 'tire surprise' on the road.

    Do what suits you. If you don't understand it, ask someone that does to explain it to you face to face. This is too much typing to do as you ask more questions.

    Maybe a visit with the service techs at your dealer can get you the answers you're looking for.

    Ride safe.
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  11. #11
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Oh No Not Again! Another freakin tire thread

    BMW Inc. does not design, build, or sell tires (though their dealers do sell them). "Maybe" they give some input to the tire manufacturers (unknown).
    The riders' manual was written before the bike was produced (so it certainly hasn't kept up with tire technology), and it was written with only a very few "recommended" tires referenced.
    I would much rather put my trust in the company that designs not only the tread, but the compound itself, and may even provide recommendations on what bike the tire is - or is NOT - good for, than in the limited general pamphlet written by any vehicle manufacturer and its lawyers.

    Look on the sidewalls, and you will see part of the labeling stating the "Maximum Cold Pressure". (NOTE that pressure should be checked BEFORE you heat the tire up by riding on it.)

    My personal method is to start at about 10 to 15 per cent lower than the "Cold Maximum" rating, and slightly adjust from that point for what "feels" like a balance of wear characteristics and handling.

  12. #12
    Just running through my mind the list of really inflammatory things to bring up on this Board. Let's see...

    Tire pressure
    Tire brands
    Synthentic vs dino
    Amsoil vs all other oils
    Ethanol
    Dynabeads
    How big a problem final drive failures really are.

    What other ones am I missing?

    Back to the OP's question...

    I run 36/42 in my tires. Not any kind of gospel, just seems to work well. I always check them before I start riding for the day. Seldom have to top them off, but have found slow leaks from picking up nails.
    Last edited by alzyck; 02-26-2012 at 08:49 PM.

  13. #13
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    Hammam's question is a good one. Why not follow the BMW's recommendations?

    One excuse to deviate is that the manufacturer of the tire itself might have more specific and up to date recommendations. Another excuse is that the rider is willing to give up one benefit in order to gain another, e.g., higher than recommended pressure may give up performance but gain tread life.

    In my own case, I run PR3's at 42/33, which neither BMW nor Michelin exactly recommend, but which gives good rear tread life and roughly equal front tread life. (Otherwise the fronts still have too much tread left when I replace tires in pairs).
    '17.5 R1200GS
    Priors: '16 R1200R, '14 R1200GS, '13 K1600GT, '08 R1200RT, '04 R1150RT, '05 R1200GS, '73 R75/5 (LWB).

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    Talking

    And you guys thought I was anal about the oil window level?!

  15. #15
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    My Dad taught me about tires and tire pressures.

    He never said squat about oil window levels. Hmm, make you wonder why doesn't it Kevin......
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    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
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