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Thread: 1998 R1100RT. One more brake question.

  1. #1
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    1998 R1100RT. One more brake question.

    Hi again,

    I am all prepared to rebuild the front master cylinder and replace all brake lines with steel. Will I be emptying the entire system, including ABS module and the connecting hoses, or just from MCs to calipers...? Haynes and Clymer seem to suggest just the MCs to calipers for brake bleed.

    Thanks!
    N

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    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtlla70 View Post
    Hi again,

    I am all prepared to rebuild the front master cylinder and replace all brake lines with steel. Will I be emptying the entire system, including ABS module and the connecting hoses, or just from MCs to calipers...? Haynes and Clymer seem to suggest just the MCs to calipers for brake bleed.
    N
    The ABS2 system on our 1100RT is a continuous flow of brake fluid from the MC to the calipers. The ABS pump just sits in the middle. Once you drain the hoses to the calipers, the ABS unit loses fluid. That is really not a big deal. Since the fluid goes all the way from the MC to the calipers, all you have to do is open up a caliper bleeder and fill the MC with brake fluid. Put a clean tube and catch bag on the bleeder. Gravity will pull the fluid down, just watch the MC level and keep it filled with fluid. If you want to move it along faster, pump the brake lever just a little bit. Donít pull it any more than normal travel, definitely donít pull it all the way to the handlebars.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

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    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
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    Once the new lines are filled with brake fluid, you can close the bleeder and MC. Put a clear tube on the bleeder at the ABS, squeeze the front brake a little and then open and close the ABS bleed nipple. If thereís any air bubble or old fluid trapped there, it will pop out. My experience is there wonít be.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

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    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    Once the new lines are filled with brake fluid, you can close the bleeder and MC. Put a clear tube on the bleeder at the ABS, squeeze the front brake a little and then open and close the ABS bleed nipple. If thereís any air bubble or old fluid trapped there, it will pop out. My experience is there wonít be.
    Great info! Thanks. Iíll report back next weekend...

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    Job completed..!

    Hello hive!

    Yesterday was a long day, but I rebuilt the front master cylinder, swapped out all the rubber for steel lines and successfully bled them. Also had the tank off to bleed at the ABS unit. Was a little anxious about that, but it went well and everything went back together with no leftover parts!!! Lots of tedious bubbles, but got all the air out and the brakes grab beautifully now. And the front lever is like butter. What a difference.
    I had never done any of this before, but in addition to other resources, this forum has been invaluable. Thanks to all who have offered tips and good counsel..!

    Cheers!
    N

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    Which stainless lines did you use? Any relevant comments about the install? Thx.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Which stainless lines did you use? Any relevant comments about the install? Thx.
    I used Galfer. Cheaper than Spengler and I read many good reviews. The kit had everything needed and lines are labeled. Easy to use.
    I asked a bunch of questions here and got great responses. Also, the Clymer manual was key. There is a good YouTube video that I found helpful as well: https://youtu.be/RPCTzU5cafU
    I read and re-read instructions and watched that video several times before doing the job. It helps me to feel more familiar with the process rather than just going step by step as I go. I still followed the Clymer instructions word for word, but I knew what to expect as I worked. Also, some of the members here had given me great tips.
    I think, including removing all the Tupperware and fuel tank, draining system, swapping lines and bleeding system (including at ABS unit), then replacing tank and Tupperware, the job should take something like 3 hours. Since it was my first time doing this, I gave myself 5 hours. And I used it all. (Plus another 1.5 hrs to rebuild Master Cylinder)
    The point is, give yourself more time than you think you need, double check you have all the tools and materials you need. And be methodical and patient. Make sure ALL the air is out of the lines.
    It is completely worth the time and work. My brakes are so strong and smooth now and I feel so confident in the safety of my set up. I didnít really realize it until I was riding with the new lines, but somewhere in the back of my mind I had been wondering, ďare these old rubber lines going to fail..Ē It is nice to not have that tiny bit of doubt floating in my head.

    Happy wrenching!
    N

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    Registered User K7GLE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Which stainless lines did you use? Any relevant comments about the install? Thx.
    Spieglers allow you to adjust the connectors at the ends of the lines to align them perfectly, eliminating any possible twisting.
    - Glenn
    2000 R1100RT (current)
    1982 R100RT (traded)
    1970 BSA A65T, 1969 Honda CB350, 1967 Honda CB160 all fondly remembered

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    Quote Originally Posted by K7GLE View Post
    Spieglers allow you to adjust the connectors at the ends of the lines to align them perfectly, eliminating any possible twisting.
    Yes, I've heard opinions about one versus the other before. I've actually used Galfer lines before with success. The question was posed to see if he used the same, and if he did, did he have any trouble lining up the fittings and lines. I'll probably use Galfer lines again. Seems ok and they're a significant cost savings. Cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Yes, I've heard opinions about one versus the other before. I've actually used Galfer lines before with success. The question was posed to see if he used the same, and if he did, did he have any trouble lining up the fittings and lines. I'll probably use Galfer lines again. Seems ok and they're a significant cost savings. Cheers.
    No problems. Everything lined up nicely with only a minimal little curve on the line from junction to right caliper; seems maybe 1/4Ē too long. Happy with the Galfers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flhfxd View Post
    Yes, I've heard opinions about one versus the other before. I've actually used Galfer lines before with success. The question was posed to see if he used the same, and if he did, did he have any trouble lining up the fittings and lines. I'll probably use Galfer lines again. Seems ok and they're a significant cost savings. Cheers.
    Yeah they are cheaper. Until the bad fit loosens a fitting joint due to the stress of misalignment and you get brake fluid leaking all over the frame of your bike. There goes the savings...

    I will _never_ use a Galfer line again. Ever... Spieglers for me and that is because I believe they are better quality overall and they can be adjusted to fit perfectly, not just close enough but spot on.

    Brakes are just too important on a motorcycle.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

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    Thanks for your input HW.

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