Page 4 of 15 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 14 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 225

Thread: Refreshing Glenlivet's ride

  1. #46
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Dec14A.jpg
    View of the nose after two light applications of plastic filler to eliminate a wave in the original fiberglass. The high spots visible on either side of the green filler post-sanding tell me I need another light layer. The waviness in the original fiberglass was just barely visible, but I could see it against the straight edge of the lightbar.

    Dec14B.jpg
    When I started fiberglassing the unsightly seam between the halves of the tub last month, I started on the side facing the bike figuring that my skills would improve as I gained experience, so the side the public saw should be the last part I did. It worked out well. By the time I got to the right side of the tub I'd already made every imaginable mistake and learned from each. The right side was nearly perfect, with only a few very slight imperfections that need plastic filler.

    Dec14C.jpg
    Even though the shallow spot was less than two inches across, to avoid ripples each layer of plastic filler has to cover the entire width of the area being worked. All this fresh filler has to cure, then be sanded with care to the desired curve

    Dec14D.jpg
    I mixed almost enough filler to coat the entire right side...but not quite. I'll catch the residual on the next layer. In the meanwhile, more sanding.

    Dec14E.jpg
    As I sand the light green filler, high spots show as the black gelcoat is exposed. All the truly high spots had previously been ground down and covered with fresh fiberglass. The two large black spots in this photo are about a millimeter higher than the filler around them. So more filler, more sanding

    Dec14G.jpg
    The next sanding reveals no major high spots remaining. I sand away the filler till the gelcoat just begins showing in multiple locations and the surface is free of waves and ripples. The darkest spot up forward is not a high spot, but where the side of the tub begins curving into the narrow nose. I've placed the clamshell lid atop the tub in this shot. Because it needed no modifications and there were fewer imperfections, most of it is still covered in gray primer.

    Dec14H.jpg
    Frontal view with the lid in place shows one small high spot on the right, but it's barely noticeable by feel and will be behind the lightbar.
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  2. #47
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Dec15A.jpg
    Work on the nose continues as I shift from the bottom half to the top. There are some significant waves in the original fiberglass with as much as 1.5mm variation from the high spot to the low spots. Over the years I've noticed the waves when the light was just right, but it never bothered me all that much. To Miyagi-San, a retired autobody perfectionist, it was an affront! The rig must be perfect before it leaves his shop. So I mixed up a batch of plastic filler and using the widest applicator, spread a relatively thick layer on the nose. The first layer goes on heavy and is sanded down till the high spots appear. Subsequent layers are much thinner, but are also sanded down till just a thin film remains. Remember from previous posts that the truly egregious high spots had been ground down and repaired with fiberglass, then topped with glaze. When I mention filler I'm not talking about your grandfather's Bondo.

    Dec15B.jpg
    Post-cure, with sanding well underway. When dealing with straights, curves, and transitional compound curves one must be careful and use a variety of sanding blocks. I appear to be getting the hang of it.

    Dec15C.jpg
    The propane delivery truck showed up at noon. With the paint booth now usable, Miyagi-San pushed his 150cfm compressor outside and setup his sandblaster. It was a fine Vermont day, bright and sunny, so I carried the subframe outside and prepared to sandblast it.

    Dec15D.jpg
    Dressed like an Ewok, I blasted the subframe (pausing so my mentor could flip it for me) then the swingarm which I had forgotten to do in my cabinet blaster. As soon as the backlog of paint jobs clears the paint booth, the freshly blasted parts will get epoxy primed.

    Dec15E.jpg
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  3. #48
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Dec17A.jpg
    A bit day in the shop. After three iterations the hump on the nose is nearly gone. The shot above was taken after the second application of plastic filler. As you can see I still have a hot spot, so more filler, more sanding and

    Dec17B.jpg
    Close but no cigar! I got 75% of the high spot, but missed the bottom part. So the DA sander came out and more of the original fiberglass hump was removed

    Dec17C.jpg
    Any spot that is more than 1mm higher than the surrounding surface is sanded down like so, then covered with plastic filler (much better than your grandfather's Bondo) and sanded down. Repeat as needed. If there is less than 1mm difference, it's handled with filler.

    Tomorrow this will be coated with a light layer of filler, then sanded down. I expect the result will be a perfectly smooth surface ready for glazing, then priming.

    Now on to the subframe.

    Dec17D.jpg
    Sandblasted yesterday, the subframe was ready for two good coats of epoxy prime. Here it is hanging in the paint booth.

    Dec17E.jpg
    It costs a lot to operate a paint booth, especially in Vermont winters. So when priming, you cram as many jobs into the booth as possible. In the back is my subframe, in the middle the front bumper off a Lincoln, and in the foreground hanging like windchimes are the smaller components of my subframe and swingarm accompanied by parts from a vintage Porsche being restored.

    Dec17F.jpg
    Not sure if you can see it, but just to the left of the nut in this photo is a horizontal crack. There are about 75,000 hard miles on this subframe, with many of them on rough Forest Service roads at high rates of speed, so metal fatigue is not unexpected. While this crack will be easy to fix, it was a good reminder to check the subframe annually.

    Dec17G.jpg
    All the pieces-parts post cure cycle will spend the night hanging like wind chimes behind the Ferrari.
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  4. #49
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Much sanding today, but first I removed from the paint booth and inspected all the freshly primed parts. There were a few small spots missed by the spray gun, but overall coverage was excellent!
    Dec18A.jpg

    Then back to Sand The Floor. While my plastic filler application skills still need some work, thanks to all the mistakes I'm getting pretty good at sanding! The nose is nearly perfect, though I didn't extend the filler high enough to take in the ripples between the lid hinges. Will start on that tomorrow. There's also a rather prominent bump on the lower half that I'd been intending on ignoring since it's in an out of the way spot, but the perfection bug has been biting lately. I'll sand down the gelcoat and possibly some of the original fiberglass in the morning, then hit it with filler and sandpaper.
    Dec18B.jpg

    I started sanding the rear as well; it will need some attention units tomorrow with the long board to remove some minor ripples.
    Dec18C.jpg
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  5. #50
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    1,586
    This reminds me of the many applications of fiberglass and fillers I applied to my first car. I think I turned 80% of it into dust.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  6. #51
    Registered User RIDERR1150GSADV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    S.Florida
    Posts
    986
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    This reminds me of the many applications of fiberglass and fillers I applied to my first car. I think I turned 80% of it into dust.
    You'd be surprised at how much all that dust weighs by the time it's all said and done.... At the plant I worked at, it was collected and used as filler for the cheaper parts we made....
    MOA # 108516
    Current ride 2018 R1200 GSA Triple Black
    Past rides '04 R1150RT, '05 K1200LT, '06 R1150GSA, 17 R1200RT

  7. #52
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    This reminds me of the many applications of fiberglass and fillers I applied to my first car. I think I turned 80% of it into dust.
    I think my percentage of dust is closer to 98%. It seems pointless, till I run my hand across the surface and find it nearly perfect!

    But today was a disheartening failure. The latest batch of filler I mixed must not have had enough hardener. It never fully cured and I ended up having to remove all of it as well as some of the previous layer. Huge step backwards!

    I also found a manufacturing defect while I was sanding off the grit-damaged powdercoat at the rear of the bike's subframe. It perfectly matched the curve of a cutting wheel, so I used one to grind out the powdercoat and widen the slit so it could be repaired by a TIG weld.
    Dec19A.jpg

    Dec19C.jpg

    Dec19D.jpg
    The end result was pretty good! Concerned that there might be more issues hidden by the powdercoating, I used a small DA to sand the rest off and inspect the metal. I found no more, but in retrospect should have just sandblasted the subframe along with the other one.

    Dec19B.jpg
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  8. #53
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    My day in the shop was cut short by strident demands from the Wife Unit to address items on the Honeydew List. I did manage to sandblast the bike subframe down to bare metal; it's now ready for epoxy priming. Looks like Friday is going to be devoted to improvements on the shop's air system, but here is the bare naked subframe

    Dec20.jpg
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  9. #54
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    410
    Those frame elements all look pretty beefy...just curious what the whole sidecar rig weighs?

    Thanks so much for taking the time to document your process. It's been very interesting and very informative.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

  10. #55
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    2,228

    Ride

    Looking at pictures of the front of sidecar on post 46 with a bit of creative painting and some whiskers you could make it look like Glenlivet is riding in a big ole catfish people would love that in Tennessee next June.

  11. #56
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    Quote Originally Posted by 179212 View Post
    Looking at pictures of the front of sidecar on post 46 with a bit of creative painting and some whiskers you could make it look like Glenlivet is riding in a big ole catfish people would love that in Tennessee next June.
    I thought about getting creative with painting the nose, but with the lightbar and skidplate up front the art would just sort of disappear. Sure could have had some fun with that!
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  12. #57
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    2,228

    Ride

    Forgot about you mentioning light bars etc. now any members good with photoshop?
    This fiberglass work kind of reminds me of drywall work a expert can put on way less material not do very much sanding and have it look better!
    On another has anyone had the “talk” with Glenlivet about how he better appreciate all this work you’re doing for him?
    Last edited by 179212; 12-30-2018 at 03:52 AM.

  13. #58
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    The nose is finally coming together well and though many layers of plastic filler have been applied, each has been sanded down to expose high spots which are then reduced in height and covered with the next skim layer of filler...and the process repeats. Vertical and horizontal ripples in the front and sides of the nose are now gone, so I applied a skim layer to the curve where those two sections meet. Once those curves integrate gracefully into each other, I'll be done with this section.
    Dec26A.jpg
    Dec26B.jpg
    Top photo is fresh skim. Notice how much better I'm applying it these days? I've moved beyond the toddler applying frosting to his first cake level and might actually be getting the hang of this! The second photo shows the sanding half done. The curves are right, but the filler must be sanded down (maintaining those curves) till just a tiny bit of it remains.

    In the process of detail sanding around the cockpit opening I uncovered yet more air pockets left over from the original manufacturing process. Because Hannigan uses a gel coat most of these are never seen, but some are exposed when even a light impact cracks the paint and reveals their presence. In this case, light contact with the lid when it was closed caused these pockets to peek out from where they were hiding. I probably could have drilled them out a bit and filled them with plastic, but the gold standard is a fiberglass repair. The pockets were exposed and the area surrounding them was ground down a bit so the fiberglass patch wouldn't protrude above grade. Tomorrow I'll sand it level
    Dec26C.jpg

    Then on to the previously discovered crack in the subframe. This plate is one of the highest stressed mounts on the rig. The original Hannigan subframe was showing the effects of my riding style in just 15,000 miles. Claude Stanley's team at Freedom Sidecars rebuilt and reinforced it, which did fine for an additional 75,000 hard miles.
    IMG_1269.jpg

    IMG_1266.jpg
    In the process of removing that mount I noticed that the steel plate was bent as well. No big surprise there. It was bent back with a large sledge, the crack was ground to a V-groove on both sides and will be welded. I've also decided to add another metal plate beneath it. Not just a gusset, but a plate the full size of the existing one edge welded together and to the subframe. That should do me for another couple hundred thousand miles especially, since I'm now retired, I don't actually have to rush my adventures in order to keep HR off my back!
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  14. #59
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    6,283
    Thanks again for showing us the process.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  15. #60
    TravelsWithBarley.com
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Craftsbury, Vermont
    Posts
    1,757
    After several days of high temps in the teens and lows below zero, things warmed up and it rained. Rain hitting ground that cold turns to ice. And ice, especially since Vermont is mostly hills, makes for difficult travel. On Friday I almost made it up Miyagi-san's steep driveway, but not quite. As the AWD RAV4 with studded snow tires started sliding backwards I used throttle, brakes and steering to keep it centered between the drainage ditches on either side, impressed the heck out of his neighbor by making a sliding 90 degree turn in reverse, sliding between her truck and a split rail fence, then sliding another 200 yards to the town road which had been heavily sanded. It looked like skill, but the pucker factor was high!

    Today his driveway had been sanded, so it was back to work. I flipped the sidecar over to make it easier for me to sand the bottom half, but with reading glasses in place noticed that the fiberglass around one of the rear mounting points was cracked. Badly. In fact, with light pressure I could push the glass down a quarter inch. The soft section was a near perfect outline of one of the small aluminum blocks used to lift the body. When I had first seen that years ago I was uncomfortable with it; it seemed to me that having the support run the full width of the tub would have provided much more support. Looks like I was right on that score, so when I remount the tub that's how I'll do it.

    Dec30A.jpg

    So I used a small knife to dig out the bad section, but it soon became evident that there was a lot of debridement required. So I moved on to a burr grinder and carefully ground away till the edges were in healthy tissue.

    Dec30B.jpg
    Dec30C.jpg

    I feathered the edges and sanded off the gel coat, layed down two sections of fiberglass cloth, then built up the area with glass matting.

    Dec30D.jpg

    Dec30E.jpg
    Tomorrow I'll use a long board to sand the repair level with the good side, then flip the rig and reinforce the other side with more glass.
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '12 R1200GSA with Hannigan sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

Similar Threads

  1. Thanks for making Glenlivet's first rally so special!
    By glenfiddich in forum Rally Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-29-2018, 06:51 PM
  2. Isn't it refreshing
    By mikeb921 in forum Hexheads/Camheads
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-19-2009, 02:41 PM
  3. Bay Area Coast Ride (First Real Ride On Bike!)
    By tkdan235 in forum Ride Reports
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-19-2008, 02:02 PM
  4. Replies: 260
    Last Post: 10-24-2005, 07:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •