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Thread: Packing for a camping trip

  1. #16
    When I'm not going on a trip, the GS sits with panniers weighing 60#'s total [ including the Vario cases weight ]. When I did 8K miles in 3 weeks to Ak. the two dry bags weighed 63#'s, for a grand total of 123#'s. I took things I didn't use, and could care less I didn't use them, the same items will go with me the next trip as well.

    38# in one dry bag was just camping gear. The other was clothes and spare parts and 2 qts of oil etc.

    If you've got the room, why skimp on something you might need and not have it when you do. Forethought goes a long way while on the road.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  2. #17
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    Pack for a bicycle and take it on a motorcycle. No overloading.
    Walter

    "Sometimes I wonder if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it." Mark Twain

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by WalterK75 View Post
    Pack for a bicycle and take it on a motorcycle. No overloading.
    I'm unlikely to travel 8K miles on a bicycle as I did on the M/C.. My panniers weigh more than what someone would carry for gear on a bicycle, and using that idea, the bicycle would be overloaded with just the empty panniers.

    If your m/c can't haul the gear [ all 125#'s of it, time for a different m/c. It would suggest your m/c couldn't even handle a passenger riding 2 up who would weigh more than the total weight on an 8K mile trip.
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  4. #19
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    Camping gear

    I'm guilty of overdoing everything. I tend to pack for what I must have and for what might be. If a plan calls for a 2x4 I'll use a 2x6. Not only what to pack but how to pack it on the bike is another issue. On my last and first trip, I had handling issues at slow speeds. At the first opportunity for a stop, I moved the gear I had packed forward some, and the handling really improved. It is these little things I learned from trying. This forum is very valuable to me in learning from other's ideas and mistakes. Keep um coming.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I got a page not found message.

    Or, was that your point?
    Whoops, link got fixed

    Unfortunately, useful content like this just gets tossed instead of updated and continuing to publish on our site.

    This link has content captured from bmwmoa.org in 2003 and it's hosted on Archive.org

  6. #21
    Registered User RIDERR1150GSADV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    Whoops, link got fixed

    Unfortunately, useful content like this just gets tossed instead of updated and continuing to publish on our site.

    This link has content captured from bmwmoa.org in 2003 and it's hosted on Archive.org
    I wish we still had a "Hall of Wisdom" where peeps could go and get their questions answered for the most part, instead of the endless ad nauseam discussions on every topic.
    MOA # 108516
    Current ride 2018 R1200 GSA Triple Black
    Past rides '04 R1150RT, '05 K1200LT, '06 R1150GSA, 17 R1200RT

  7. #22
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownie0486 View Post
    I'm unlikely to travel 8K miles on a bicycle as I did on the M/C.. My panniers weigh more than what someone would carry for gear on a bicycle, and using that idea, the bicycle would be overloaded with just the empty panniers.

    If your m/c can't haul the gear [ all 125#'s of it, time for a different m/c. It would suggest your m/c couldn't even handle a passenger riding 2 up who would weigh more than the total weight on an 8K mile trip.
    You missed my point. Pack light.
    Walter

    "Sometimes I wonder if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it." Mark Twain

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalterK75 View Post
    You missed my point. Pack light.
    Why?

    Almost any modern (post airhead) BMW has a designed payload well north of 400lbs. Unless the rider is eating up a huge portion of that, there should be plenty left for most anything (within reason) you want to take.

    The most important thing is pack the weight as far forward as practical (use the pillion seat for dufflles instead of hanging them way off the back on a rack) and adjust the preload on the rear suspension to maintain proper handling.


    I agree with brownie.

    My left saddlebag (the warmer one over the muffler) stays packed (in a saddlebag liner) with spare parts, special tools, spare visors, jacket liners, multiple weight gloves, rain gear, etc. Basically anything I might need for me or the bike on any ride. It's always there on the bike, so I never forget something or wish I had decided to bring it.

    My right saddlebag has a hat and my Gerbing in it all the time. On trips, the right bag is where I put the saddlebag liner that stays packed with toiletries, alarm clock, meds, towels, etc. I add to that any clothes that I decide to take for the specific trip. A big +1 on the convertable pants (zip off legs).

    My small 22liter top box is for my cpap gear. It is ready to go with a 20 ah deep cycle battery (same physical size as a PC680) in a small padded camera case with carrying handle, all 12v wiring, a charging wire to charge the battery while riding, and a cpap mask and hose that is just for camping. When leaving on a trip, all I do is clip the top case on the bike and put my cpap machine in and go.

    All my camping gear is packed in my RevPack tour pack. It stays packed with an 8x8 tent (I like plenty of space), footprint, 8 heavy duty tent stakes,multiple lengths of parachute cord, stake hammer, a Kermit chair, a roll up table, a fillo pillow, and a pair of flip flops. Before a trip, I add my Thermarest (should not be stored rolled up), and whichever Big Agnus sleeping bag is most appropriate for the anticipated temps (also should not be stored rolled up). The tour pack gets loaded onto the pillion seat with it's included straps and double anchored with a pair of RocStraps.

    I can be packed within an hour. Choosing which T-shirts to bring is what probably takes the longest.

    Most importantly, the rear tire gets inflated to the recommended fully loaded spec. and the shock preload gets bumped up to the fifth.

    The bike handles VERY well with this setup.

    I don't really understand the "minimalist" approach.. After all it's not like backpacking or bicycling where the extra weight causes a direct impact on the person. We have the machine handle it.
    But I respect everyones ability to do whatever makes him or her happiest. That's what this sport is all about! Freedom and smiles per gallon.




    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98lee View Post
    Why?

    Almost any modern (post airhead) BMW has a designed payload well north of 400lbs. Unless the rider is eating up a huge portion of that, there should be plenty left for most anything (within reason) you want to take.

    The most important thing is pack the weight as far forward as practical (use the pillion seat for dufflles instead of hanging them way off the back on a rack) and adjust the preload on the rear suspension to maintain proper handling.


    I agree with brownie.

    My left saddlebag (the warmer one over the muffler) stays packed (in a saddlebag liner) with spare parts, special tools, spare visors, jacket liners, multiple weight gloves, rain gear, etc. Basically anything I might need for me or the bike on any ride. It's always there on the bike, so I never forget something or wish I had decided to bring it.

    My right saddlebag has a hat and my Gerbing in it all the time. On trips, the right bag is where I put the saddlebag liner that stays packed with toiletries, alarm clock, meds, towels, etc. I add to that any clothes that I decide to take for the specific trip. A big +1 on the convertable pants (zip off legs).

    My small 22liter top box is for my cpap gear. It is ready to go with a 20 ah deep cycle battery (same physical size as a PC680) in a small padded camera case with carrying handle, all 12v wiring, a charging wire to charge the battery while riding, and a cpap mask and hose that is just for camping. When leaving on a trip, all I do is clip the top case on the bike and put my cpap machine in and go.

    All my camping gear is packed in my RevPack tour pack. It stays packed with an 8x8 tent (I like plenty of space), footprint, 8 heavy duty tent stakes,multiple lengths of parachute cord, stake hammer, a Kermit chair, a roll up table, a fillo pillow, and a pair of flip flops. Before a trip, I add my Thermarest (should not be stored rolled up), and whichever Big Agnus sleeping bag is most appropriate for the anticipated temps (also should not be stored rolled up). The tour pack gets loaded onto the pillion seat with it's included straps and double anchored with a pair of RocStraps.

    I can be packed within an hour. Choosing which T-shirts to bring is what probably takes the longest.

    Most importantly, the rear tire gets inflated to the recommended fully loaded spec. and the shock preload gets bumped up to the fifth.

    The bike handles VERY well with this setup.

    I don't really understand the "minimalist" approach.. After all it's not like backpacking or bicycling where the extra weight causes a direct impact on the person. We have the machine handle it.
    But I respect everyones ability to do whatever makes him or her happiest. That's what this sport is all about! Freedom and smiles per gallon.




    Now you got me thinking I did not over pack. Pleas post a picture of your bike fully loaded if you have one handy. Thanks

  10. #25
    AK. and back, two bags weigh 68#'s or so, panniers 60 total/30 per side including bags weight. 125-128#'s with bags is no more than a pillions weight 2 up. The bike is more than capable of running 90 all day set up like I had it and running at about 50% of redline.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    The lion does not even bother to turn his head when he hears the small dog barking.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/azqkr

  11. #26

    a couple of things I do

    Quote Originally Posted by 1hpyrider View Post
    I just completed my first motorcycle camping trip on my GSA. I've only had the bike for one month so I'm still learning about this subject. I suspect I over packed as in keeping with the boy scout motto, "Be prepared". Everything having to do with the tent went into one Seal Line waterproof bag. Clothes in another waterproof bag both strapped one on top of the other. Stuff for preparing food went into my left side case and riding gear went into the other. The bike felt very heavy in slow maneuvers. All my camping gear is what a back packer would use for hiking.
    Your input is appreciated. Are you motorcycle campers minimum or maximum campers?


    I never leave without cold riding weatherproof gear, it helps keep warm at night in the tent. Always pack a headlamp and batteries. The low tech way to go light is to take a hammock and an expensive down bag. Bring your medicine. Bring your toolbox and a backup cellphone if you have one. Here are two things i have done that I have not seen others do.

    I often use a hard sided cooler for my tailbag. I get to camp empty the stuff out of it and go to the store for food and ice. Its weatherproof. I glued DRINGs from my raft setup onto my bags and cooler and tie stuff down to them. The cooler also makes a reasonable chair. The cheap camp chairs work fine but I do have the high end REI one in my ultimate bag. I take a solar shower... no weight and really makes camping easier. 10 bucks. Take twine. small and you might need it.

    Best bag for the back is a Gregory waterproof bag that has tiedowns on all four sides and is still accessible on the top. North Face makes a similar bag. Bring a cheap garbage bag for a backup to cover whatever needs to be covered.

    I have a waffle air mattress with a gore tex reflective surfaces on either side .. light, takes no space and does a really nice job.

    Anything cotton in your bag... get rid of it.

    Take a stocking cap for staying warm at night.

  12. #27
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    Security and Safety

    I've noticed that in all these responses that no one has mentioned personal protection. At age 74, I'm in no position to fight off young thugs. Safety and security is very important especially when we set out alone for a extended motorcycle camping trip. What do some of you do for protection? I have a concealed pistol permit which allows me to carry my pistol on my person. In this day and age, I never leave home without it. However, I hope never to have to use it. What are your thoughts?

  13. #28
    Depending on the state of issue and reciprocity of where you travel.......
    That said, I think discretion is the better part of valor.
    But, theoretically it shouldn't take up too much room.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  14. #29
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1hpyrider View Post
    I've noticed that in all these responses that no one has mentioned personal protection. At age 74, I'm in no position to fight off young thugs. Safety and security is very important especially when we set out alone for a extended motorcycle camping trip. What do some of you do for protection? I have a concealed pistol permit which allows me to carry my pistol on my person. In this day and age, I never leave home without it. However, I hope never to have to use it. What are your thoughts?
    Try carrying bear spray with your camping gear. Much less hassle here in the US and you can cross into Canada with it so long as it's in the large red containers and clearly labeled "Bear Spray". Canada will not allow palm-sized personal defense cannisters, but they are OK with bear spray. As a non-lethal option, you are more likely to use it when you actually need to and with lesser consequences if you flub up. And, it's much more effective than a handgun should you actually encounter....a bear. I almost never take my handgun along anymore when motorcycle camping.

    As always, your best defenses are still a strong sense of situational awareness and a willingness to adjust your presence or plans should your SA start alerting you.

    YMMV, IMHO, all that.

    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST 1984 R80 G/S-PD 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C 2010 K1300GT 2018 R1200GS
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  15. #30
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1hpyrider View Post
    I've noticed that in all these responses that no one has mentioned personal protection. At age 74, I'm in no position to fight off young thugs. Safety and security is very important especially when we set out alone for a extended motorcycle camping trip. What do some of you do for protection? I have a concealed pistol permit which allows me to carry my pistol on my person. In this day and age, I never leave home without it. However, I hope never to have to use it. What are your thoughts?
    Although it isn't something I would do, I don't really have an opinion on whether someone should or should not be packing a firearm. I have both friends and family that won't leave their home without their concealed handgun, which is fine if that makes them feel safer. One family member is a former LEO, so he's really the only one I would trust with carrying a firearm and knowing when (and more importantly, when not) to use it. I like the suggestion of GT Rider to carry bear spray...may start doing that myself.

    This subject has been discussed to great extent on many of the motorcycle forums I've been a part of for years. In all those years, I've never heard of an instance where a firearm was actually necessary.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

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