Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: I guess there is a real shortage of mechanics

  1. #1
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    12,975

    Question I guess there is a real shortage of mechanics

    More rain today so I was out running errands. I went by the Nissan dealer to pick up a couple of oil filters, crush washers and a cabin air filter for the NV3500.
    When I opened the oil filter box to check the order, there was a sticker on the closed end of the filter(s) that showed the multi-brands they sell and, in big letters,
    "Looking for a career change? We are looking for service technicians".
    I guess if you are capable of changing oil, you would be pretty much good to go as a technician- I prefer mechanic.......Technician make me think of someone in a lab coat looking for a wifi connection.
    I guess mechanical times are really changing.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  2. #2
    Ponch ponch1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Fountain Hills AZ
    Posts
    1,296
    I’m too old for that. 30 years ago sure.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    My Motorrad
    BMWMOA 162849 | BMWRA 41335 | VROC 8109-R | VBA 19

  3. #3
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    Posts
    1,312
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    "Looking for a career change? We are looking for service technicians".
    I guess if you are capable of changing oil, you would be pretty much good to go as a technician- I prefer mechanic.......Technician make me think of someone in a lab coat looking for a wifi connection.
    I guess mechanical times are really changing.
    OM
    Here, we changed the designation of Inter-provincial Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic to Red Seal HET, Heavy Equipment Technician.

    A great deal changed including the ability to load a grease gun all the way to slinging something for lifting.

    I don't have patience for HET's anymore after I saw one toss a cordless grease gun in the garbage because it quit working and another one called a crane company to install a boom cylinder.
    1997 R1100RT, 1981 KZ 440 LTD, R80RT, R90/6 sidecar, K1100RS,1983 K100RS (Cafe now)

    “The major civilizing force in the world is not religion, it is sex.”

  4. #4
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    12,975
    Quote Originally Posted by dieselyoda View Post
    Here, we changed the designation of Inter-provincial Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic to Red Seal HET, Heavy Equipment Technician.

    A great deal changed including the ability to load a grease gun all the way to slinging something for lifting.

    I don't have patience for HET's anymore after I saw one toss a cordless grease gun in the garbage because it quit working and another one called a crane company to install a boom cylinder.
    It's amazing and funny watching people load a grease gun I'm currently involved with a group that thinks using a sling that runs over the cutting edge of the loader in the same place every-time is nothing to worry about
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  5. #5
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,918
    I managed to finish up my career as an operator with all digits in tact; the last three years were as an HDR.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden
    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner
    1963 Dnepr

  6. #6
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nibley, UT USA
    Posts
    854
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    More rain today so I was out running errands. I went by the Nissan dealer to pick up a couple of oil filters, crush washers and a cabin air filter for the NV3500.
    When I opened the oil filter box to check the order, there was a sticker on the closed end of the filter(s) that showed the multi-brands they sell and, in big letters,
    "Looking for a career change? We are looking for service technicians".
    I guess if you are capable of changing oil, you would be pretty much good to go as a technician- I prefer mechanic.......Technician make me think of someone in a lab coat looking for a wifi connection.
    I guess mechanical times are really changing.
    OM
    I think you may have it backwards. To me, a “mechanic” is basically anyone wielding a wrench and conveys nothing in terms of training or experience. “Technician” implies some level of training and certification, at least to me. Take a look at what’s required to obtain the full range of ASE certifications-and a lot of auto shops won’t hire someone without at least two ASE cert:
    https://www.yourmechanic.com/article...-ase-certified

    Think of it another way. When you roll your BMW into the service bay, do you want it worked on by a technician who has been trained at BMW service school, or the untrained mechanic who was hired initially to bust tires and do oil changes? At my local BMW shop the staff working at the lifts are all “technicians”—says so right on the work order and on their company shirts. Several of them have been there for a lot of years and have been through BMW service schools multiple times, starting in the 90s, and they are very good. I’d much sooner have those “technicians” working on my bike than the relatively untrained early-20s “mechanics” I see at some local Japanese dealerships.

    IMHO, of course.
    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST — 1984 R80 G/S PD — 1993 R100GS — 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C — 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  7. #7
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    2,026
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    It's amazing and funny watching people load a grease gun
    When I started out working in my Dad's shop, we loaded grease guns the hard way. No fancy pre-filled tubes to simply slip in place, there was a five gallon keg of grease that you had to fill the gun from. When I started my apprenticeship with him, I learned how to actually fix components, not just open a parts box with a new one. Dad was from the old school of mechanics and I learned a lot of that from him and it was still part of my training even though it was becoming less common in the shops. Today, diagnostics is the major skill, followed by just replacing components to complete the fix. I would agree that mechanic is not a suitable title any longer.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  8. #8
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mansfield,MA
    Posts
    12,975
    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider View Post
    I think you may have it backwards. To me, a “mechanic” is basically anyone wielding a wrench and conveys nothing in terms of training or experience. “Technician” implies some level of training and certification, at least to me. Take a look at what’s required to obtain the full range of ASE certifications-and a lot of auto shops won’t hire someone without at least two ASE cert:
    https://www.yourmechanic.com/article...-ase-certified

    Think of it another way. When you roll your BMW into the service bay, do you want it worked on by a technician who has been trained at BMW service school, or the untrained mechanic who was hired initially to bust tires and do oil changes? At my local BMW shop the staff working at the lifts are all “technicians”—says so right on the work order and on their company shirts. Several of them have been there for a lot of years and have been through BMW service schools multiple times, starting in the 90s, and they are very good. I’d much sooner have those “technicians” working on my bike than the relatively untrained early-20s “mechanics” I see at some local Japanese dealerships.

    IMHO, of course.
    Best,
    DG
    Possibly......I always viewed the ASE certification as a good "baseline" of "starting point" for a facility to give a reference point to their customers. Some people are really good at tests and could use the test prep materials- https://www.ase.com/Test-Prep-Traini...he-Guides.aspx to achieve a certification.
    If someone was to have been to a specific school- such as BMW school, they probably had some talent that got them into the schools selection process.
    As far as the mechanics at the Japanese dealers, I noticed the situation 50 years ago. While there were teenagers working on things at "shop rate", I never suffered any ill effects.

    Anyway, my main point is that this facility was opening up oil filter boxes and affixing a sticker to the filters in an attempt to find help. I can only figure this tactic is targeted at people doing their own work or working on another brand? I wonder if if the concept is working?
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  9. #9
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Quote Originally Posted by dieselyoda View Post
    Here, we changed the designation of Inter-provincial Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic to Red Seal HET, Heavy Equipment Technician.

    A great deal changed including the ability to load a grease gun all the way to slinging something for lifting.

    I don't have patience for HET's anymore after I saw one toss a cordless grease gun in the garbage because it quit working and another one called a crane company to install a boom cylinder.
    The top level for a welder has been Red Seal for as long as I can remember. But they are still called welders and not Technicians yet. Interesting that as the technology changes and diagnostics get more automated naming conventions move along as well.

    We used to have home mechanics, shade tree mechanics, amateur mechanics, garage mechanics, heavy duty mechanics, marine mechanics, diesel mechanics, professional mechanics and expert mechanics.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

Similar Threads

  1. The real road to Real de Catorce
    By michaellmcc in forum Off the Beaten Path
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-21-2015, 10:32 AM
  2. I guess I will keep the RT !
    By oldnslow in forum Oilheads
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-14-2014, 08:07 PM
  3. Volunteer shortage
    By smartin108 in forum Rally Forum
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 07-31-2012, 03:43 PM
  4. lodging shortage not
    By aaaaaa in forum Rally Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 01:41 AM
  5. Needed - BMW basic mechanics for non-mechanics
    By Plainsscout in forum Campfire
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-23-2007, 04:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •