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Thread: The Bicycling thread

  1. #1
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    The Bicycling thread

    Well, thought this new section would have taken off a bit more, maybe this winter

    Anyways, the other two wheeled transportation/exercise/adrenaline pumper activity often crosses borders, so here is my story.

    Being the youngest in the family,I always seemed to get the hand-me-downs on most things, including wheeled toys. My first two bikes were missing the rubber from the pedals and the first one with the training wheels which had been used several kids got me going. My dad gave all three boys Stingray knock-offs one year and my first new bike...I was hooked.

    I rode that bike everywhere chasing the bigger kids, doing wheelies, putting baseball cards in the spokes or balloons to make a motorcycle sound. The summer of 5th grade, I was playing chicken with my older brothers teenaged friends and I did not blink...result was a broken leg but bragging rights. A carful of high school girls in a '65 mustang stopped and took me home, much to the chagrin of the wreckees. I had a crush on Mustangs and high school girls after that

    As soon as the full cast came off, I got back on a bike and moved up to a ten speed that was my junior high steed soon after. Then I got a paper route and added a heavy duty hauler to hold the racks. I had the route for two years before I started working as a porter at the local Honda shop. Took me a few years to break the piggy bank and buy a used '67 Honda 90. Still had a ten speed, but the motor took over for a few years.

    Fast forward to High School and the cycling bug called me back and I bought a French bike from Boones Cycles in Houston, soon built up another bike with Campagnolo and Zeus components and sew up tires and started doing camping and racing criteriums in Houston area...I often placed second in my age bracket...only two of us
    Met and rode with John Howard and a few of his National team members who smoked our young a$$es...we loved it anyways.

    Another jump in time after making a jump to a full time girlfriend then married and babies. The bike hung in garage and the motorcycles disappeared for many years. I rode with my kids and watched them get the scars and broken bones I did. The bug bit me again and started cycling on the '72 Mercian I had built up almost fifteen years before. This time I was in Austin and the hills and older body took some time to build endurance. Folks made fun of the old school components, but I could still outclimb the haters.

    Replaced the '72 with a new '92 Vitus 992 with full Campagnolo components...sticker shock at $2300. Put many miles on that one and on a whim, I replaced with the current Cannondale I ride now...a 2002 Team Saeca Tour de France team replica also with full 9 speed Campy components Old but reliable.

    Met Helen a few years later when she yelled at me to "get a motor" while I was waiting on a signal to change and two women on H-Ds pulled up alongside. We met again a few years later and after a few dates, we were riding Beemers and we stopped on a county road where three guys were stopped...she told them to "get a motor" . That's when I realized the Harley rider was her. Still laugh about that.

    She started riding bicycles a few years back, however she recently bought a Cannondale Synapse, full carbon fiber, electronic shifting and has become a terror. I know have to work harder to keep up which is good and bad. I am back to cycling shape in spite of my Iowa Rally Hernia surgery pause. She asked the doctor at my follow up visit after surgery when I could get back to cycling...he said as soon as I wanted, just take it slow.We were on a 30 mile ride the next day

    IMG_1145.JPG

    IMG_3031.jpg

    This year I think we have more cycling miles than on the motors. Sure feels that way to me!
    Last edited by henzilla; 10-08-2018 at 11:00 PM.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  2. #2
    Great stories. When I was 14 I bought a genuine Sears and Roebuck Allstate Moped. 49cc's of wicked speed (30 mph) and no real need to pedal except to start the engine. This was freedom, all over town and beyond. My buddy Buzz and I would ride that thing two-up the 20 miles to go camping at the state park. Wire baskets held some stuff but Buzz had to hold the sleeping bags as we roared along to the park. I told myself then, and still agree now, "If it has two wheels and does not have a motor I am not interested."

    I tried riding bicycles with the grandsons a few times. The pain overcame the togetherness so we took up shooting baskets and walking.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  3. #3
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Thanks Steve.
    Good pictures
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  4. #4
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    The side effects of pedaling have done well for me...except for that pre-teen broken leg part. Besides the smiling most of the time attitude, my blood pressure makes the nurses double check...was funny at hospital pre-op.
    I am not 16,30, or 50 anymore, but cycling can level that playing field most the time. I eat better, though if I do eat that cheeseburger and fries a few times a week it's not that big of a deal. Resting heart rate and blood work recently came back good. We have been riding earlier in day to beat the heat, but being acclimated helped cycling and motoring.
    I also had knee surgery last spring for a torn meniscus from years of pole climbing and jumping off trucks,poles and loading docks...same dang leg I broke way back. Was on crutches a few days, but on the bike within weeks...low impact and great physical therapy. Feels better than had in years.

    My nephew in his late twenties was real cocky and called me old man when I was almost 50, took him to Hottern' Hell 100 in Wichita Falls TX during August...he blew off the front with some hammering fellas and I found him 40 miles later with an IV in his arm in a med tent. I finished feeling great and he said nothing... ever again.

    We have been Mt Biking regularly as well, much harder than smooth pavement and better chance of layin'it down...which you try to avoid. If lucky, just step off bike, if not it may hurt. Trail riding on hike and bike trails lets you cover a lot of ground. The state parks have some serious trails meant for more youthful abandon, I know better now though I have better insurance. We do them, but will get off when it's prudent.
    I tried do attach the pic of her still at the top shaking her head but not happening with that one.

    KIMG0481.jpeg

    Found her a Cannondale V with a carbon swingarm bike a bikeshop guy had refreshed for his girlfriend for a gift...she wanted something more like an Iphone so I got a deal. Mine is another old school hardtail with rockshox fork Cannondale I have had many years...once again it does fine.

    We take the mt bikes in our toyhauler when traveling that way and get to try out a lot of scenic trails. Makes getting around the parks way more fun too.

    We did the LBJ ride two years ago...early April and should be in the 50's at start...was 28 and off we went. Dang it was cold

    FullSizeRender-4.jpg
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  5. #5
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    Count me in on this thread. I've been motoring since 1963 (Honda C200 90cc) and pedaling since about 1955 or 56. Unlike Steve, I don't have a gap longer than 6 mos (and then only once) in motoring, and no gap in pedaling. Today I have a '12 Bonneville and a '15 RT in the motor garage, and a Santana Ti-700, a Bianchi CF, a custom Terry (built for me) and my wife has a custom Co-Motion. Most of my travels are on 2 wheels, the only way to go! Over the years, I've owned about a dozen motors, and more "pushbikes" than I can list. I've worked in motorcycle shops, as an engineer (for Raleigh bicycles), and I've owned (and still own 1) several bicycle shops over the years. 2 wheels are the best way to travel, most of the time.
    J Goertz
    BMW MOAL
    2015 BMW R1200RT
    2012 Triumph Bonneville SE

  6. #6
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    I knew there are several here

    A bud back in the day had a Raleigh Record with Campagnolo bling...we hated him just a bit riding a Murray

    The places a bike and motors have taken me thru the years have been great times and crazy memories.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  7. #7
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Count me in as well...current ride is a a Specialized Roubaix full carbon frame ($2600 bike with the right size frame for me that I found on CL for $900...DEAL!) I'll do 30-40 miles 2X/week, depending on how much time I have. I'm an avid skier (alpine/backcountry touring) and the biking is the best summer exercise I've found to keep the legs somewhat in shape.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

  8. #8
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    I always liked bicycles as a kid but stopped riding after high school.
    About 20 years later I got back into it when we bought a couple Trek 7600 Hybrids. I think that was 1993.

    IMG_0060.jpg

    In 2000 I added a Trek 2300 road bike to our collection.
    It was a demo bike that was used on RAGBRAI. RAGBRAI is a annual ride across Iowa.
    Here's a picture from 2 years ago when I was getting ready to sell it. Decided to keep it

    2000 Trek 2300 (4).JPG

    2017 (2).jpg

    A couple years after that Debbie also bought a RAGBRAI demo bike, a Lemond Big Sky SL.

    20180311_141019.jpg

    8-12-16 (2).jpg

    8-7-2016 (2).jpg

    On longer rides I used her bike.
    scan0001.jpg

    In 2012 we traded our Hybrids for Trek 7.5 Hybrids.
    P1000262.JPG

    P1000304.JPG



    In 2016 I bought a left over Trek Domane 5.9. It's full carbon fiber with electric shift.

    8-5-16 Ride (3).jpg

    RAGBRAI Monday (2).JPG


    This summer Debbie sold her Lemond to a friend that has wanted it ever since she bought it and purchased a 2 year left over Trek Domane 6.
    This bike is also full carbon fiber.

    2016 Domane 6 Series (1).jpg

    7-7-2018 (1).jpg

    7-3-2018 (2).jpg
    Last edited by Lee; 10-09-2018 at 07:17 PM.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  9. #9
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Here's a few pictures from Mackinac Island and Manistique Mich. Sep 2017.

    20170917_125816.jpg


    20170918_124601 (2).jpg


    20170920_132950 (2).jpg


    20170919_124712 (2).jpg


    P1040296.JPG


    20170923_132535.jpg


    P1040325.JPG

    This is the Sarris rack we use.

    Sarris & Domanes (3).jpg
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  10. #10
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    I know more folks are chiming in, some head scratchers as well. The techies and engineers should be impressed with the current iteration of pedaled machines and the innovations.

    The ever improving technology of bicycles kinda reminds me of modern motorcycles,especially the innovations from BMW. From frame materials and design, to drivetrains and wheel/tire technology the bikes currently out there are as impressive.

    I look at the latest drivetrain on a touring/racing bike for example...it now has 11 cogs at the wheel hub where 5 was the way it was for years.The chain is so narrow now, was already narrow with the 9 speed vintage I ride. Hydraulic disc brakes on both wheels and even electronic shifting are a available. The same option on mountain bikes and hybrids as well.

    H's newest is a full monocoque carbon frame and fork, disc brakes,Shimano di2 electric shifting and an 10 speed drivetrain. Visual and technology A+
    cannondale-synapse-al-disc-105-277991-1.jpg

    cannondale-synapse-di2-disc-2016-6-e1467968924386.jpg

    Compared to my aluminum framed 9 speed from early 2000's, it is a space shuttle vs turbo prop plane. I can keep up, but having a few more lower cogs and wider range of front chainrings makes climbing a chore more for me. I hear a chirp from her derailleur and look down to see I have no more to bail to. Good times.

    The tires are bead type, often at 115psi or more and boy will they go off like a gunshot. Prior to this evolution in the 80's, race tires were tubular, tube sewed insde carcass and glued to the shallow dished rim.On hot descents hard braking and maybe a questionable glue job, the tire could roll offthe rim. BTDT.
    Was so glad when that changed. Michelin and Continental have been in this market for years among others.

    I saw a Campagnolo component page with Brembo brake calipers. Shimanos are brand stamped, but imagine it's a known brake builder. Magura is a big player from day one.
    cannondale-synapse-di2-disc-2016-4-e1467968966407.jpg

    I still have rim brakes on both my bikes and after riding a disc bike... just like difference of a /5 and a current model...major.Rim brakes will stop you still, but under certain conditions fade quickly.

    Mountain bikes now are available with 29" wheels from the long time 26". I poo-pooed them as a fad until I gave one a try recently.It was like going to a 21" dirt bike wheel over a 17".
    There are some cool fat tire bikes, some now with electric motors in a few different drivelines. E-bikes take some of the excuses away as well, rent one and check them out.

    Can you tell it was raining here? Sorry
    Last edited by henzilla; 10-09-2018 at 11:16 PM.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  11. #11
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post

    I look at the latest drivetrain on a touring/racing bike for example...it now has 11 cogs at the wheel hub where 5 was the way it was for years.The chain is so narrow now, was already narrow with the 9 speed vintage I ride. Hydraulic disc brakes on both wheels and even electronic shifting are a available. The same option on mountain bikes and hybrids as well.
    Our old road bikes had 9 sprockets in the back, 3 in the front. Our new bikes have 11 in back and 2 in front.
    I like the 11 speed double gearing better than the 9 speed triple.
    I don't have a granny gear now, but 99% of the time the current gearing is better for me.
    Di2 shifting is

    Newer mid to high end bikes are really amazing.
    A lot of bargains out there if you buy left overs or used.

    Raining here also
    5.5" since Saturday and a couple of tornadoes close to town late afternoon.
    This is after 12" a couple weeks back
    The yard started to flood but the rain stopped before it got up to the house.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  12. #12
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Just after the front came thru, leaving almost 2", H jumped on her mt bike to go splash ...I took a nap. Road ride tomorrow is good for me.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  13. #13
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Nice thread
    I have a Shogun Bike. I guess you would call it a mountain bike. Being circa 1983, I don't think the mountain bike term had been invented yet. I bought it for the larger tires to soften the ride. I have a Dahon folding bike in the motorhome as well. At this stage of things I like the folder better as I find it really uncomfortable being leaned forward (on the Shogun).
    Perhaps something like a 20" with a more upright position and suspension could get me back on....as I would like to. I used to watch Superbikes with a host named Jason Britton. He was a stunt-rider extraordinaire and on his off days, to stay in shape, he would do 27 mile loops on his bike- Specialized IIRC. Great exercise and it seems that many of the top athletes rely on the benefits of being on a bike.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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  14. #14
    It had pedals. The last vehicle I have had with pedals.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #15
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    I know more folks are chiming in, some head scratchers as well. The techies and engineers should be impressed with the current iteration of pedaled machines and the innovations.

    The ever improving technology of bicycles kinda reminds me of modern motorcycles,especially the innovations from BMW. From frame materials and design, to drivetrains and wheel/tire technology the bikes currently out there are as impressive.

    I look at the latest drivetrain on a touring/racing bike for example...it now has 11 cogs at the wheel hub where 5 was the way it was for years.The chain is so narrow now, was already narrow with the 9 speed vintage I ride. Hydraulic disc brakes on both wheels and even electronic shifting are a available. The same option on mountain bikes and hybrids as well.

    H's newest is a full monocoque carbon frame and fork, disc brakes,Shimano di2 electric shifting and an 10 speed drivetrain. Visual and technology A+
    cannondale-synapse-al-disc-105-277991-1.jpg

    cannondale-synapse-di2-disc-2016-6-e1467968924386.jpg

    Compared to my aluminum framed 9 speed from early 2000's, it is a space shuttle vs turbo prop plane. I can keep up, but having a few more lower cogs and wider range of front chainrings makes climbing a chore more for me. I hear a chirp from her derailleur and look down to see I have no more to bail to. Good times.

    The tires are bead type, often at 115psi or more and boy will they go off like a gunshot. Prior to this evolution in the 80's, race tires were tubular, tube sewed insde carcass and glued to the shallow dished rim.On hot descents hard braking and maybe a questionable glue job, the tire could roll offthe rim. BTDT.
    Was so glad when that changed. Michelin and Continental have been in this market for years among others.

    I saw a Campagnolo component page with Brembo brake calipers. Shimanos are brand stamped, but imagine it's a known brake builder. Magura is a big player from day one.
    cannondale-synapse-di2-disc-2016-4-e1467968966407.jpg

    I still have rim brakes on both my bikes and after riding a disc bike... just like difference of a /5 and a current model...major.Rim brakes will stop you still, but under certain conditions fade quickly.

    Mountain bikes now are available with 29" wheels from the long time 26". I poo-pooed them as a fad until I gave one a try recently.It was like going to a 21" dirt bike wheel over a 17".
    There are some cool fat tire bikes, some now with electric motors in a few different drivelines. E-bikes take some of the excuses away as well, rent one and check them out.

    Can you tell it was raining here? Sorry
    That Cannondale Synapse is a LOT of bike for the $$$.
    Larry Gregerson; Bend, OR
    MOA #93031

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