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Thread: Shelf life of a BMW motorcycle dealership

  1. #46
    Registered User easy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WWeldin View Post
    Blue Moon in Norcross sold their BMW stake to what has become Hour Glass Cycles in Buford, which was not listed yet. Blue Moon now concentrates on vintage BMW bikes.

    Also, another BMW dealership cropped up in McDonough, GA, which gives the metro Atlanta market 3 choices (BMW Motorcycles of Atlanta being the 3rd.)

    Wonder why that directory does not show these changes, which have been done for over a year.

    I guess it just depends on the wording in the search criteria.

    A poor way to run a website which is a major way to get business.

    E.

  2. #47
    Dealers: the really good ones last a long time and do well. The less than good ones don't last. Some of the old-time ones opt out. That is sad.

    On this very forum I just read about my favorite dealership, Engle Motors in Kansas City (since 1956), with a comment that said that making people happy was their business model. I didn't write it but it describes Mike Jones, his late father Norman Jones and his son Adam Jones and the whole staff to a T. Bet on it. I do know one guy who was unhappy with them years ago but he brought that on himself to his own detriment.

    I have been their customer since 1984. A few new bikes. More used bikes. One year $10,000 in parts, 19 new tires, and stuff getting ready for a 76K year by Voni and an Iron Butt Rally by me. No new bikes. Now we are 1,100 miles away and still they are "our dealer."

    One key thing - for everybody - is to patronize a dealership. Close or far. Pick a dealership. Get to know them and let them know you!! They won't last if all we do is use Amazon, or eBay, or Moto Bins.

    There are other good ones we have used over the years and while traveling: NOTE: Every single dealership has some fans and some detractors. The best dealership in the world has at least one person that is unhappy with them.

    Max is superb. BMW of Grand Junction is excellent. Mac's in Clarkston Washington and BMW of Grand Junction, CO have been excellent for us. My big point is give these guys a chance to be excellent, expect it, and they often are.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 10-11-2018 at 05:03 AM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  3. #48
    The Big Red One sgtbill's Avatar
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    A Norm Jones story

    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Engle Motors in Kansas City (since 1956), with a comment that said that making people happy was their business model. I didn't write it but it describes Mike Jones, his late father Norman Jones and his son Adam Jones and the whole staff to a T. Bet on it.
    When I returned to the US with my first BMW motorcycle back in 1982 I was stationed at Ft Riley Kansas and had the pleasure of riding with a larger-than-life rider named William Boniface "Jack the Ripper" Rippert. Jack was a fixture at rallys in the early to mid eighties. He told me a story about hitting a deer in Colorado on a ride. He ended up in the hospital and the bike was heavily damaged. Norman Jones brought a truck to Colorado and picked up Jack's bike, got him some percodan, and brought him home. That's customer focus.
    sgtbill
    Duty First!
    86 K100RS EML & 79 R100S
    2007 F800ST & 2014 F800GS & 2014 F700GS

  4. #49
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    I've posted this before, but ...

    Previously our dealership in Albuquerque was a multi line dealership and the 2nd longest standing BMW dealership in the USA. They couldn't be trusted to do an oil change correctly.

    Now the BMW motorcycle franchise is owned by the local BMW auto dealer and it's imho one of the best dealerships in the USA. This dealership has locations for both cars and bikes in both Albuquerque and Santa Fe.

    I'm pretty certain the key to success in BMW motorcycle dealerships is combination with BMW car dealerships. It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands. No generators and jet skis at BMW dealers that interest me.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  5. #50
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    I've posted this before, but ...

    Previously our dealership in Albuquerque was a multi line dealership and the 2nd longest standing BMW dealership in the USA. They couldn't be trusted to do an oil change correctly.

    Now the BMW motorcycle franchise is owned by the local BMW auto dealer and it's imho one of the best dealerships in the USA. This dealership has locations for both cars and bikes in both Albuquerque and Santa Fe.

    I'm pretty certain the key to success in BMW motorcycle dealerships is combination with BMW car dealerships. It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands. No generators and jet skis at BMW dealers that interest me.
    That's really interesting. Back in 1982 I moved back to Vancouver BC from Alberta where I had been working in summer and riding to Mexico in winters. The only BMW bike dealer was Vancouver BMW which was a car dealer first but had a motorcycle division in the same building. Two full time mechanics and a parts guy. They did very well and delivered good service under the ownership and management of the car dealership. When that ended one of the mechanics eventually opened another BMW dealership for motorcycles only after running his own small bike shop for several years. BMW demands on inventory, paint schemes, floor space... killed the small dealership and a big one opened. Prices went way up and and the service level went way down. Today they won't look at a BMW motorcycle that unless it is less than 10 years old, carry next to zero parts inventory and nothing for airheads. You can order it from a warehouse across the country or wait for the next ship from the motherland. Things really went downhill IMHO.

    Luckily we still have an independant (same mechanic who opened a small shop way back when...) and they stock airhead parts and will work on ANY BMW motorcycle although their main expertise is still airheads, Urals and Royal Enfield bikes now. So things changed a lot up here for BMW but not necessarily for the better with these BIG dealerships.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  6. #51
    Knight-Errant 1957mpd's Avatar
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    The Owner's Footsteps...

    There is a line in the movie "Bottle Shock" this thread reminds me of. The vineyard owner, played by actor Bill Pullman, says to his intern, "A vineyard's best fertilizer is the owner's footsteps." (The line is actually older than the screenplay, written by Hungarian-born writer Eleanor Perenyl b. 1920). But I think it's true of most successful small businesses. It has been decades since I've bought a car or a motorcycle from a franchise where I could not talk to the owner. My money, my rules.
    "Soló el que ensaya lo absurdo es capaz de conquistar lo imposible." Miguel de Unamuno 1905

    Mark - Las Cruces, NM - '10 K1300S and '17 R1200 GSA

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    I've posted this before, but ...

    Previously our dealership in Albuquerque was a multi line dealership and the 2nd longest standing BMW dealership in the USA. They couldn't be trusted to do an oil change correctly.

    Now the BMW motorcycle franchise is owned by the local BMW auto dealer and it's imho one of the best dealerships in the USA. This dealership has locations for both cars and bikes in both Albuquerque and Santa Fe.

    I'm pretty certain the key to success in BMW motorcycle dealerships is combination with BMW car dealerships. It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands. No generators and jet skis at BMW dealers that interest me.
    interesting perspective. I cannot recall ever being in a BMW combo dealership (cars & bikes) that I liked. Most of the time I feel like the motorcycle customer is ignored or shunted to the other side where "the toys" are sold. The car guys seemed pretty snooty. Just my impression.
    Royce
    On the coast of Kansas
    2012 F800ST

  8. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands. No generators and jet skis at BMW dealers that interest me.
    Not sure how much German “culture” is left in BMW, considering they are actively marketing bikes and engines sourced from 3rd parties in India, China, and Taiwan, but it makes a person somehow feel better to pay more than they really need to for a thing or service, that’s up to them.

    I’d rather put tile in my own garage than pay to have it installed at the dealers.

    I look for value in a transaction, shop at businesses that provide it, and remain unimpressed with the BMW corporate driven merchandising environment.
    -I just wanna ride on my motor sickle-

  9. #54
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    I've posted this before, but ...

    Previously our dealership in Albuquerque was a multi line dealership and the 2nd longest standing BMW dealership in the USA. They couldn't be trusted to do an oil change correctly.

    Now the BMW motorcycle franchise is owned by the local BMW auto dealer and it's imho one of the best dealerships in the USA. This dealership has locations for both cars and bikes in both Albuquerque and Santa Fe.

    I'm pretty certain the key to success in BMW motorcycle dealerships is combination with BMW car dealerships. It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands. No generators and jet skis at BMW dealers that interest me.
    That's really quite a strong assertion, suggesting your local dealer is one of the best in the USA. I am quite curious to know how many other BMW dealerships you have shopped at and had your vehicles serviced at in order to come to this conclusion? 10, 20, 30?

    "It's really the BMW/German culture that counts, and frankly it's completely apples/oranges when comparing to price-driven selling to kids, which imho describes most other brands."

    Yup, it's the German culture, technology and engineering that interests me when I shop for a vehicle. Price just isn't all that important. I recently had to replace the automatic transmission in my 2008 BMW 323, mileage of only 145kkm. Imagine my surprise when I discovered the transmission isn't made or even designed by BMW or even a German manufacturer like Getrag. My fine German car came with a GM transmission. It seems that in order to keep the profit margins up, the lower end 328 and 323, e90 series had to be build with outsourced crappy GM transmissions. Only the higher end 330 models at the time had the real BMW decent transmissions installed. Yup, it's that German culture and lack of price driven sales that keep me coming back to BMW products! Well at least my R80 and 1150RS have a German designed and built transmission.

  10. #55
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    BMW transmissions alright, by way of Getrag. In the words of one pundit; “Getrag—they manufacture excuses and transmissions”. Or words to that effect...
    😊
    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST — 1984 R80 G/S PD — 1993 R100GS — 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C — 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  11. #56
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacque Jacque Shellacque View Post
    That's really quite a strong assertion, suggesting your local dealer is one of the best in the USA. I am quite curious to know how many other BMW dealerships you have shopped at and had your vehicles serviced at in order to come to this conclusion? 10, 20, 30?
    You pick one ... it's not better than mine.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

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