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Thread: Motorcycle Dolly

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by jagarra View Post
    Sterob,

    Just to reiterate my warning:

    When I was taking my Concours off the style dolly you chose, I had the same bad dolly issue yesterday. After I flipped the lever to lift up the front end then went back to do the rear, the front would flip down as soon as the rear was engaged. Went to the front to engage, soon as I did the rear flipped down on the wheels.

    Gets really scary when you lift the weight off the side stand to upright the bike and the wheels are down on either end, the rack tries to shoot out from underneath flipping bike into you. So be careful when locking and unloading the dolly, I had to go back and forth a few times till I managed to get them to stay lifted.
    I have had this thing for about 2 months and I have the same issue of the ends flipping when you flip the other end. When I unload it, I flip open the side with the front wheel and take the bike off and not worry about it. When I get the bike off, I turn it around and flip both ends down. My garage floor is slippery with a coating. Where the leading edge (front wheel) is, I place a rubber matt (tool drawer liner) under the foot to keep it from sliding when I try and load the bike.

    I try and load the bike by walking it on. Just rolling. With the bags, it's a little heavy in the rear. On Saturday, I tried goosing it on with the throttle and I'm not so good at low speed stuff. The front wheel went over the front stop bar and tipped over. It was a challenge righting the bike, because it's heavy (and only a naked) and I was worried the dolly would shoot out sideways. It didn't but I need to be more careful.

  2. #17
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    I realize that you've already made your decision, but if for some reason those dollys don't work out, I favor the Park‒n‒Move. It goes under your center stand. I hit an obstacle when moving the bike around on it once and the center stand collapsed. I was able to catch the bike and keep it from falling, but now I secure the center stand with a racheting strap and I check for obstructions before I move the bike.

    It helps to get the bike onto the center stand if you elevate the front wheel a bit. I use a stack of magazines I place on the ground when I pull into the garage. I have one edge tapered and then duct taped the stack into a solid unit. I ride up on it when I pull in.

    PNM_Standard_Shot2.jpg

    pnm-3-inch-1.jpg

  3. #18
    Gerard jagarra's Avatar
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    Those center stand dollies work pretty good, I have the cheaper version for my R90 and it works OK. The issue I have with that style is that you have to get the bike up on it and you have changed your fulcrum length when you place a stand underneath the center stand, so it becomes so much harder to get the bike up on the new platform.

    I am using the side stand dolly primarily because it's easier to get the bike on it. Maybe a modification is in order for the front flapper of the HF unit, either drill a hole so a screw or bolt can be stuck in side when raised so it can't flip or bend the arm so that the flapper can rotate just a bit further. I am thinking that it is not rotating far enough when raised to get past the center of the fulcrum.
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  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by beemerdood View Post
    I realize that you've already made your decision, but if for some reason those dollys don't work out, I favor the Park‒n‒Move. It goes under your center stand. I hit an obstacle when moving the bike around on it once and the center stand collapsed. I was able to catch the bike and keep it from falling, but now I secure the center stand with a racheting strap and I check for obstructions before I move the bike.

    It helps to get the bike onto the center stand if you elevate the front wheel a bit. I use a stack of magazines I place on the ground when I pull into the garage. I have one edge tapered and then duct taped the stack into a solid unit. I ride up on it when I pull in.

    PNM_Standard_Shot2.jpg

    pnm-3-inch-1.jpg
    I just got one of these for moving my bikes around in the off-season storage unit. In addition to the mounting difficulties that Jag describes, my ‘84 RT really exceeds the device’s 500-lb weight rating. Probably because of this, it wasn’t really very easy to move the bike around once it was on the thing, even on smooth concrete. I’ll use it for my Vespa P200, which is only half the weight of the RT.

  5. #20
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    FWIW- a half century of rigging has me look at this device and I would pass on it. I guess it would be the difference between stopping on two wheels and stopping on four wheels. It’s not that I think that it is a bad idea, I just see everything needing to be “just right” for it to work well.
    Add the fact that the center-stand folds and I would rather see the long ramp or channel style with two sets of wheels.
    As always, YMMV.
    OM
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  6. #21
    Registered User caseyc's Avatar
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    Had a lead on one of these for pretty cheap locally, but just missed it. I did some research, and it appears really slick, although a bit expensive. Especially if you need multiple.

    https://www.condor-lift.com/index.ph...product_id=100
    Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagarra View Post
    Those center stand dollies work pretty good, I have the cheaper version for my R90 and it works OK. The issue I have with that style is that you have to get the bike up on it and you have changed your fulcrum length when you place a stand underneath the center stand, so it becomes so much harder to get the bike up on the new platform.
    As I mentioned, this is easily handled by simply raising the front wheel a bit. I wrote, "It helps to get the bike onto the center stand if you elevate the front wheel a bit. I use a stack of magazines I place on the ground when I pull into the garage. I have one edge tapered and then duct taped the stack into a solid unit. I ride up on it when I pull in."

    Quote Originally Posted by jagarra View Post
    I am using the side stand dolly primarily because it's easier to get the bike on it.
    I had to place the end of my channel type loader against the wall to keep it from skittering away when I pushed the bike onto the ramp. In my set up, the wall is not always available. And when the bike is on the sidestand it takes up more floor space, than when on the centerstand.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by khittner View Post
    I just got one of these for moving my bikes around in the off-season storage unit. In addition to the mounting difficulties that Jag describes, my ‘84 RT really exceeds the device’s 500-lb weight rating.


    You're mistaken. The website gives the Park‒n‒Move a weight capacity of 1,100 pounds.

    I know people who use them for full dress HD's that easily exceed that when loaded. None of them report any issues. Your "84 RT"" is nowhere near "exceed[ing] this device's weight rating."

    Quote Originally Posted by khittner View Post
    Probably because of this, it wasn’t really very easy to move the bike around once it was on the thing, even on smooth concrete.
    Sometimes I park on a covered, outdoor, cement slab and when the wind blows hard, it moves it moves the bike around on the Park‒n‒Move unless I lock the wheels on it. It sounds as if you've either gotten sand in the bearings or our definitions of "smooth concrete" vary widely. I've moved mine onto the 'poorly laid,' paving stone, parking pad, that my wife uses, to take some photos. While it certainly didn't move smoothly over the rough surface, it was doable and I never felt that the bike was going to tip or slide off the surface of the device. Take a look in the shadow area of this photo to see the detail (and roughness of the surface) in the paving stones.

    BMW R1200RT 09 (2).jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by khittner View Post
    I’ll use it for my Vespa P200, which is only half the weight of the RT.
    The Park‒n‒Move will easily hold either bike and if there was a way to put one on top of the other, you STILL would not exceed its weight limit.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    FWIW- a half century of rigging
    I've done a bit of rigging myself. Forty years of owning my own sailboats, and helping others with both new boats and replacing existing rigging on older boats. I also spent quite a bit of time rock climbing, rigging climbing and rappel anchors and pendulums.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    has me look at this device and I would pass on it. I guess it would be the difference between stopping on two wheels and stopping on four wheels.
    All of these devices have four wheels, so I guess I'm not understanding what this refers to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    It’s not that I think that it is a bad idea, I just see everything needing to be “just right” for it to work well.
    Again, not understanding what you're talking about. Perhaps if you'd give some examples of 'things not being right so it doesn't work well' I'd get it.

    To use the device I ride into the area where I plan to park. I place the previously mentioned stack of duct taped magazines on the ground, and pull forward so the front wheel sits on them, then drop the side stand. I place the Park‒n‒Move under the center of the bike so that when I swing the center stand down by hand, it lands squarely on the flat surface of the Park‒n‒Move. I like to leave some clearance on the right side of the stand so that the centerstand lever give clearance to the left rear wheel on the Park‒n‒Move. Then I put the bike on the center stand, attach the ratchet strap, and move it where I want it. I can very easily swivel it around in its own length, something that much more difficult with the channel type devices, because they have the wheels at the ends of the channel while the Park‒n‒Move wheels are centered closely together under the bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    Add the fact that the center-stand folds and I would rather see the long ramp or channel style with two sets of wheels.
    Don't sidestands "fold" too? I only know of one brand whose sidestands lock, HD. Again, I'm not sure why you bring this up? ALL of these devices have "two sets of wheels" right? Not sure what the length of the "ramp" or "channel style" has to do with how well these devices work. When I've tried the channel devices I found them quite cumbersome to turn around. I can stand at the rear of my RT, press down to raise the front wheel and pivot the bike in its own length.

    As I said, the only issue I've had in about 4 years is when I hit an obstruction and the bike came off the centerstand. That's impossible now that I'm using a ratchet strap to keep it from folding.

    Just realized that I sound a bit like a salesperson here. I have no connection to the company at all.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by caseyc View Post
    Had a lead on one of these for pretty cheap locally, but just missed it. I did some research, and it appears really slick, although a bit expensive. Especially if you need multiple.

    https://www.condor-lift.com/index.ph...product_id=100
    I've seen these at some bike shows and they are VERY nice. They have the best locking devices of any of these tools and the large diameter wheels make for very smooth travel, even over some rough surfaces.

    But the PRICE! YIKES!!

  11. #26
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerdood View Post
    I've done a bit of rigging myself. Forty years of owning my own sailboats, and helping others with both new boats and replacing existing rigging on older boats. I also spent quite a bit of time rock climbing, rigging climbing and rappel anchors and pendulums.



    All of these devices have four wheels, so I guess I'm not understanding what this refers to.



    Again, not understanding what you're talking about. Perhaps if you'd give some examples of 'things not being right so it doesn't work well' I'd get it.

    To use the device I ride into the area where I plan to park. I place the previously mentioned stack of duct taped magazines on the ground, and pull forward so the front wheel sits on them, then drop the side stand. I place the Park‒n‒Move under the center of the bike so that when I swing the center stand down by hand, it lands squarely on the flat surface of the Park‒n‒Move. I like to leave some clearance on the right side of the stand so that the centerstand lever give clearance to the left rear wheel on the Park‒n‒Move. Then I put the bike on the center stand, attach the ratchet strap, and move it where I want it. I can very easily swivel it around in its own length, something that much more difficult with the channel type devices, because they have the wheels at the ends of the channel while the Park‒n‒Move wheels are centered closely together under the bike.



    Don't sidestands "fold" too? I only know of one brand whose sidestands lock, HD. Again, I'm not sure why you bring this up? ALL of these devices have "two sets of wheels" right? Not sure what the length of the "ramp" or "channel style" has to do with how well these devices work. When I've tried the channel devices I found them quite cumbersome to turn around. I can stand at the rear of my RT, press down to raise the front wheel and pivot the bike in its own length.

    As I said, the only issue I've had in about 4 years is when I hit an obstruction and the bike came off the centerstand. That's impossible now that I'm using a ratchet strap to keep it from folding.

    Just realized that I sound a bit like a salesperson here. I have no connection to the company at all.
    Glad it's working out for you.
    OM
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    Glad it's working out for you.
    OM
    Some reason you haven't answered the simple direct questions I asked of you?

    In case you missed them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    It’s not that I think that it is a bad idea, I just see everything needing to be “just right” for it to work well.
    Again, not understanding what you're talking about. Perhaps if you'd give some examples of 'things not being right so it doesn't work well' I'd get it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    Add the fact that the center-stand folds and I would rather see the long ramp or channel style with two sets of wheels.
    Don't sidestands "fold" too? I only know of one brand whose sidestands lock, HD. Again, I'm not sure why you bring this up? ALL of these devices have "two sets of wheels" right? Not sure what the length of the "ramp" or "channel style" has to do with how well these devices work.
    You criticized, quite cryptically, a device that I use and recommended. I'm just trying to find out why.
    Last edited by beemerdood; 09-18-2018 at 10:47 PM. Reason: correct punctuation and HTML

  13. #28
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Dude, it's a bike caddy, is it worth the keystrokes to argue...if it works for ya, so be it.

    I saw the statement about not being a salesman...so it's cool you are a fan.

    I had a bud give me one of those units earlier this year and actually have a GS sitting on it to check it out. My experience is you better be careful pushing/pulling it without extra effort of adding a strap on the centerstand or you will play panic catch as it rolls forward off the stand. The unit I have has the extra arm for the sidestand and I am not going to lean any one of our already lean to far bikes on it, but that's me.

    Adding a strap is a PITA for me, doable, but still a PITA and so not a fan for regular use for me. If I were needing to store a bike for some time...maybe.
    Needing to drive up on a spacer of some sort is also a pain for me...I'll do it on some bikes that have been lowered just to get the wheels off or even on the stand to change tires.

    I am spoiled and folks who know how tight I am for space will chuckle that I am currently using one
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  14. #29
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    I had three Park-n-Moves at one point when I had a small garage. Now with plenty of space I have only one and I use it only infrequently. The Park-n-Move can be quite difficult to load, finicky to move around when loaded and because of the small wheels overly responsive to minor imperfections in the floor. Additionally, as previously mentioned, there is a significant risk of the bike coming off with unpleasant results. I now use the device mainly when I store bikes for friends and I want to get the bike as out of the way as possible. I’d give it a “C” minus for a grade, but I don’t know if the other dollies on the market are any better since I have no experience using them.
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Dude, it's a bike caddy, is it worth the keystrokes to argue...
    Who's "argu[ing]?"

    I thought that this was a discussion forum where one could ask questions, get answers and learn new things. And so, when a member wrote something that wasn't clear to me about a product I've been using for several years, I asked for clarification. When it wasn't forthcoming, I could not figure out why, and so I asked.

    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    I had a bud give me one of those units earlier this year and actually have a GS sitting on it to check it out. My experience is you better be careful pushing/pulling it without extra effort of adding a strap on the centerstand or you will play panic catch as it rolls forward off the stand. The unit I have has the extra arm for the sidestand and I am not going to lean any one of our already lean to far bikes on it, but that's me.
    Now here is some criticism that is clear and is easily understood. The cryptic passage from Omega Man, "… it would be the difference between stopping on two wheels and stopping on four wheels" makes no sense to me and so I asked what he meant.

    A bike can JUST AS EASILY roll off its sidestand! Such criticism applies to both the channel stands and to the Park‒n‒Move.

    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Adding a strap is a PITA for me, doable, but still a PITA and so not a fan for regular use for me.
    Another clear and concise criticism. NOT AT ALL like the comment from Omega Man ‒ "I just see everything needing to be 'just right' for it to work well." He's vague, and I'm unable to tell what he's referring to, so again, I asked. For some mysterious reason, he didn't answer me.

    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Needing to drive up on a spacer of some sort is also a pain for me...I'll do it on some bikes that have been lowered just to get the wheels off or even on the stand to change tires.
    I don't see why this is a PITA. When I leave the house I put the duct tapes magazines on the ground. When I come home I ride up on it. The only hassle is putting it down and picking it back up. But your criticism is AGAIN clear and easy to understand. UNLIKE Omega Man's comment that the long channel models have "two sets of wheels" when the Park‒n‒Move ALSO HAS TWO SETS OF WHEELS.

    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    I am spoiled and folks who know how tight I am for space will chuckle that I am currently using one
    It appears that you too, use them. LOL.

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