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Thread: Aerostitch Questions....

  1. #16
    TravelsWithBarley.com
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    I've had a onesie Stich for ten years now. Best commuter suit ever! But when I'll be on the road for days it stays home and I wear the Rallye 3 suit.

    Out west where the heat is dry the R3 was okay with a wicking layer underneath, but the wind protection on the GSA was too good to allow air up my sleeves unless I alternated holding one hand at a time up for air flow. Back east in high heat and humidity it was barely tolerable when moving, but if traffic was held up by construction or a crash it was absolutely miserable.

    Pete
    '12 R1200GSA for solo rides
    '10 R1200GSA with Hannigan dual sport sidecar for rides with Glenlivet
    '15 Honda CRF250L for exploring places I'm afraid to take the big GSA!
    http://travelswithbarley.com/

  2. #17
    Registered User jnrugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realshelby View Post
    Having owned 2 Aerostich Roadcrafters, I can directly answer some concerns. I had the standard Roadcrafter with liner, and I have the R-3 "light" version. Sold the standard as it was prone to leaks. The R-3 has the new zippers. No leaks. MUCH, MUCH lighter! I thought it would be hard to put on with the armor just stuck in place. No worries, I have yet to knock a piece loose. The R-3 is lighter, the thinner version much lighter. I assume the regular R-3 would be about the same in hot temps, meaning the R-3 design is about 10 degrees happier. Meaning at 85 degrees I can stand it when moving, where the standard suits are hot at 75 in my opinion. Riding behind the RT wind protection means they are too hot for me in high temps. I do run a cooling system ( circulates ice water through a vest ) that allows me to run at higher temps, but my legs get too hot.

    One piece is the only way to go for a commuting suit. Traveling....well there are good points about a two piece. I run two piece suits also.

    Putting them on with boots is the only way I have ever done it!

    90 degrees is too hot on a faired bike to use them. If you have to unzip them to stay cool, they are not protecting.

    Zippers are two way. No problem unzipping to use the restroom. Of course, once you get used to putting them on, they come off and on so quick you might jump out of it anyway.

    What are the good points of a 2 piece suit?
    I looked at the Klim suits at Max's and the combo cost more than a one piece 'stitch as the 2 piece 'stitches do if I recall correctly.

  3. #18
    Registered User jnrugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenfiddich View Post
    I've had a onesie Stich for ten years now. Best commuter suit ever! But when I'll be on the road for days it stays home and I wear the Rallye 3 suit.

    Out west where the heat is dry the R3 was okay with a wicking layer underneath, but the wind protection on the GSA was too good to allow air up my sleeves unless I alternated holding one hand at a time up for air flow. Back east in high heat and humidity it was barely tolerable when moving, but if traffic was held up by construction or a crash it was absolutely miserable.

    Pete
    I have a 1150RT and when the weather is bad I am glad for the protection.
    When it's Bloomburg hot not so much, but the electric windshield helps the upper body.
    Looking at a GSA I never thought the wind protection was that good.
    A GS for the next ride has been considered, but don't want to give up the wind protection.
    May have to reconsider.

  4. #19
    Addicted to windshields Realshelby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnrugg View Post
    What are the good points of a 2 piece suit?
    I looked at the Klim suits at Max's and the combo cost more than a one piece 'stitch as the 2 piece 'stitches do if I recall correctly.
    Two piece suits allow you to remove the jacket. When at fuel stops, or going into a store to pick up some stuff, or into a restaurant that is nice. Pants don't look quite as alien to other people when you go inside! In warm temps I wear shorts and weird socks with my boots so keeping pants on is less frightening to children! Two piece suits can at times be more comfortable, but not always.

    I like having both types, there are times when one is simply the better choice. If I were commuting again a one piece would be my only suit for that.

    There are those that swear a non mesh suit is comfortable at 100 degrees. Swear that mesh is the wrong choice. Let them get stopped in traffic, or get into slow traffic for while in 90 degree weather and then explain that theory to me. There is NO one suit does it all. I have different gear for different situations. I just got back from North Carolina. I rode up in my mesh kevlar Motoport two piece. Rode in the R-3 Aerostich one piece most of the time up there. It was in the 70's to low 80's and raining some. Stich is perfect for that. Mesh kevlar for the return trip, with my ice water cooling vest in use most of the time.

  5. #20
    Registered User jnrugg's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the comments and experiences.
    I do have a mesh jacket & pants for Bloomburg days, no rain liners.
    So I think I will go ahead with the R3 suit.

    Any options that are must have or very nice to have?

  6. #21
    Registered User mylanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realshelby View Post
    . . . One piece is the only way to go for a commuting suit. Traveling....well there are good points about a two piece. I run two piece suits also.

    Putting them on with boots is the only way I have ever done it!

    90 degrees is too hot on a faired bike to use them. If you have to unzip them to stay cool, they are not protecting.

    Zippers are two way. No problem unzipping to use the restroom. Of course, once you get used to putting them on, they come off and on so quick you might jump out of it anyway. . .

    Two piece suits allow you to remove the jacket. When at fuel stops, or going into a store to pick up some stuff, or into a restaurant that is nice. Pants don't look quite as alien to other people when you go inside! In warm temps I wear shorts and weird socks with my boots so keeping pants on is less frightening to children! Two piece suits can at times be more comfortable, but not always.

    I like having both types, there are times when one is simply the better choice. If I were commuting again a one piece would be my only suit for that.

    There are those that swear a non mesh suit is comfortable at 100 degrees. Swear that mesh is the wrong choice. Let them get stopped in traffic, or get into slow traffic for while in 90 degree weather and then explain that theory to me. There is NO one suit does it all. I have different gear for different situations. . . .
    +1
    I would add that regardless of what I'm wearing, I would rather be hot and sweaty (keeping hydrated, of course) than potentially lose my skin.
    2012 F650GS

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