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Thread: 12000 mile service questions

  1. #1

    12000 mile service questions

    Ok, I realize this stuff may have been answered in numerous previous posts....but any help will be appreciated.

    I just acquired a 2004 r1100s with 15500 miles on it, I recognize that I need to either get the 12000 mile major service performed, or do it myself?

    I mechanical enough that I've changed fluids and flushed brake systems in the past, and I have tools, but here is my question;

    from the BMW maintenance schedule it appears these are the things that physically need to be done (not visually checked, which I can definitely do)

    - Reading fault codes
    - Changing engine oil
    - Changing gearbox oil
    - Changing rear wheel drive oil **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles or 2 years, so I'd likely perform)
    - Changing fuel filter **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles...so do I need to do this?)
    - Clean and grease battery terminals
    - Replace air filter
    - flush front and rear brakes
    - change clutch fluid ****(this is noted as every 4 years so I'd likely do it)
    - Replace belt for generator **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles...so do I need to do this?)
    - replace spark plugs
    - adjust valve clearances

    Dealer has quoted me $750 for this major service, but cannot get to it for 3 weeks....Realistically I can't see parts and materials costing more than $200, but I don't want to deal with the fuel filter change since it involves removing the whole tank and think that replacement belt for the generator may be a bit much for me.

    Any thoughts on this stuff?

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by larrydk View Post
    Ok, I realize this stuff may have been answered in numerous previous posts....but any help will be appreciated.

    I just acquired a 2004 r1100s with 15500 miles on it, I recognize that I need to either get the 12000 mile major service performed, or do it myself?

    I mechanical enough that I've changed fluids and flushed brake systems in the past, and I have tools, but here is my question;

    from the BMW maintenance schedule it appears these are the things that physically need to be done (not visually checked, which I can definitely do)

    - Reading fault codes
    - Changing engine oil
    - Changing gearbox oil
    - Changing rear wheel drive oil **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles or 2 years, so I'd likely perform)
    - Changing fuel filter **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles...so do I need to do this?)
    - Clean and grease battery terminals
    - Replace air filter
    - flush front and rear brakes
    - change clutch fluid ****(this is noted as every 4 years so I'd likely do it)
    - Replace belt for generator **** (this is noted as every 24,000 miles...so do I need to do this?)
    - replace spark plugs
    - adjust valve clearances

    Dealer has quoted me $750 for this major service, but cannot get to it for 3 weeks....Realistically I can't see parts and materials costing more than $200, but I don't want to deal with the fuel filter change since it involves removing the whole tank and think that replacement belt for the generator may be a bit much for me.

    Any thoughts on this stuff?

    Thanks
    My thoughts from a longtime 2004 R1150RT owner (currently at 100k)

    Get a GS911 and read your own fault codes. You're not likely to find any but it does help in troubleshooting any issues that arise
    Changing engine oil and filter is straightforward. Recommended interval is every 6k with filter. Best of luck if you want to start an "oil recommendation" thread. LOL.
    Gearbox and final drive changes are every 12k I believe. They're so simple that I do mine every 6k with the engine oil.
    Air filter, no brainer
    There's lots of online tutorials on brake flushes for these servo assisted bikes. I believe BMW recommends semi-annual changes now. It's foolish not to, as servo modules are very, very expensive.
    Clutch fluid, do it annually. Very simple.
    Valve clearances. Check and adjust. Only slightly more work than an Airhead because you have 4 valves/head. Once set, I've actually had to adjust mine maybe three times in 100,000 miles. Its more of an inspection for me now.
    Bottom line, learn to do most of this yourself. It's enjoyable, bonds you with your bike, makes your more self reliant should something happen on a ride and of course, much, much cheaper.

    my $.02

  3. #3
    Left Coast Rider
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    What RPGR90S said, PLUS....

    - If you still have the original rubber brake hoses, change them NOW and install a set of braided steel lines. Your can make your own choice of supplier. Spiegler makes an excellent product.
    - Should you change a 14 year old alternator belt? I'd say yes. Simple to do.

    Congrats on the new-to-you bike! Take care of it and it will take care of you.
    Last edited by BC1100S; 05-12-2018 at 01:32 AM.

  4. #4
    Gerard jagarra's Avatar
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    While you are saving money over the dealer charge for this service, invest in a minivac unit to aid in the bleed and flushing of the brake system. Change the brake lines as recommended. The 1100 abs system is easier to bleed than the one used in the 1150. Pretty straight forward and easy to do.
    1994 R1100RS-(5/93)-,1974 R90/6 built 9/73,--1964 Triumph T100--1986 Concours

  5. #5

    maintenance

    Thanks for the replies.

    It seems pretty straight forward bleeding the front and rear calipers, not as straight forward for the abs circuit. I've read two different articles stating that bleeding the ABS unit is not necessary? Can anyone verify one way or the other?

    Does anyone have a picture tutorial, specifically for the r1100s for brake bleeding.

    Will definitely replace brake lines, but I've read that leading to an ABS fault code?

    In any case, I agree, I enjoy working on my bikes and cars myself, but I get anxiety when I do a different car or bike I haven't done before, but after I've completed I realize just how easy it is to work on some of this stuff.

    As with my first BMW, this forum has proven very helpful, so thanks for the help.

    Larry

  6. #6
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Yes bleeding the ABS is necessary, but a lot of people do it at "every other" bleed. It can be a PITA without specific tools. The "order" of which circuit gets bled may also matter; the ABS isolates not just front & rear but also the "rider's manual input" from "ABS engaged". It's very easy to leave a tiny bubble trapped somewhere, so you don't have full brakes and the light comes on. And you really don't want to go out thinking they feel OK and then suddenly have an "OH-F!" moment, btdt.
    Clutch fluid should be bled too - while it doesn't have to deal with the heat of the brakes, you still don't want it to accumulate water over time.
    Tutorials - Google Jim Von Baden. While many of his vids are for the R1200 bikes, they are still quite useful for other bikes. This forum's "Similar Threads" (down below here) should also point you to more info.

  7. #7

    bleeding brakes

    I'm assembling everything I need for my brake flush....

    I've seen 2 different tutorials, in one the push the brake pistons in and use a dummy block when bleeding the front and rear circuits, in one they do not, they just use the servo to bleed the circuits.

    I assume I have to disconnect the wiring harness from the ABS unit while bleeding it, will this automatically cause an ABS error making the GS911 tool necessary (I want to purchase one, just not at this point in time)

    As usual, thanks

  8. #8
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    If you have the wheels off, use a block to keep the pads in their bores. Not an issue if the wheels (disks) are in place.
    Don't disconnect the harness - when you grab some brake (either front or rear), the little pump motors need to run to push all of their old juice out. This is the "isolation" I mentioned earlier: there is not a direct line from your hand to the bleed outlet.
    But I've heard that the "S" has some specific differences ... dunno if the brakes are different from, for instance, a late '04 RT.

  9. #9
    Registered User
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    Pelican Brothers

    Here.
    http://forums.pelicanparts.com/bmw-r...0s-tech-forum/

    For the Alt belt, remove the 2 large side plastic body panels (don't forget the screws behind the roundel badges, accessible from around the forks underneath). You have to do that to get to the air filter anyway, and now you'll also have access to yanking gas tank, allowing for fuel filter change (don't forget to mark orientation of pump plate before removing from side of tank). Once tank is off, you'll also have easier access to upper bolts for alternator.
    All are easy jobs for a slightly experienced home wrench.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  10. #10
    1998 R1100R SE ABS
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    maintenance info

    I try to do all my own maintenance. There's good maintenance info here -
    http://ibmwr.org/r-tech/oilheads/index.shtml
    http://ibmwr.org/r-tech/oilheads/R11...ce_2-25-02.pdf
    Ed
    1998 R1100R 75th Anniversary Special Edition w/ ABS

  11. #11
    Gerard jagarra's Avatar
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    Here is another great source for factory manuals you can down load.

    https://www.carlsalter.com/bmw-service-manuals.asp
    1994 R1100RS-(5/93)-,1974 R90/6 built 9/73,--1964 Triumph T100--1986 Concours

  12. #12
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by larrydk View Post
    I'm assembling everything I need for my brake flush....

    I've seen 2 different tutorials, in one the push the brake pistons in and use a dummy block when bleeding the front and rear circuits, in one they do not, they just use the servo to bleed the circuits.

    I assume I have to disconnect the wiring harness from the ABS unit while bleeding it, will this automatically cause an ABS error making the GS911 tool necessary (I want to purchase one, just not at this point in time)

    As usual, thanks

    If you do not push back the pads, and insert the blocks, you cannot flush out all the old fluid. Some will remain in the calipers.
    The iABS servos reset on power up. No need for a GS911 to reset an ABS fault. If the fault is present upon power up, such as low brake fluid, or a defective iABS unit, then of course the fault lamp(s) will be lit.
    The wiring harness to the iABS only needs disconnecting when bleeding the iABS unit itself. Many of us do this annually. I do not know BMW's last recommendation frequency for this. I believe it changed a few times over the years.

  13. #13
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    iABS is a yearly flush according to my BMW OE Cd
    '
    Ufda happens..........

    Need your R11xx Hall sensor rewired? PM me.

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