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Thread: RS to GS

  1. #1

    RS to GS

    Hi everyone. I’m looking for opinions from anyone one who went from the new R1200RS to a R1200GS. I’ve been riding my RS for about two years and really looking at a GS for a bit more upright riding position. I would definitely want the low frame version. What would you quantify as the differences? Is it more comfy for long rides? Handling differences etc.

    Thanks for any advice.

    Steve

  2. #2
    Registered User
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    There are quite a few places that rent GSs. That would give you a long test ride.

    Cheers, Ken
    2015 R1200GS

  3. #3
    Yes, I'm planning on doing that if I can. I agree that's the best way to do it. But also looking for long term feedback. I know from experience that it can take months of riding before you really start to feel what you like or don't like about a bike.

  4. #4
    Addicted to curves azgman's Avatar
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    I looked at the new RS but decided on a GS instead. I found the seating position better, the suspension "better", (more travel and an ESA front shock), and the bars and windshield better. I have the low suspension model, but with the standard seat and I just love the bike. 600 mile days are no issue, extreme lean angles are no issue, and I find it more comfortable than my 2007 RT was. Best of luck with your decision.
    MOA #107139
    RA #28511

  5. #5
    Registered User 915e's Avatar
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    I can't speak for the RS but had similar bikes as fas as riding position or posture is concerned in my younger days. I am on my second GS and find them to be way more comfortable being able to sit more upright and having more room. I did make two "ergonomic" changes by installing Moose foot pegs and 25mm Hornig handle bar risers; I am 6'2" and those changes made both my 2008 and now 2013 GS a perfect fit.

    The GS is definitely a tall bike (but you make adjustments or buy one with the low suspension if needed) but will lean and handle like a sports bike, especially if you put some street oriented tires on. Mine currently has Heidenau K60's and it still corners fairly well but I already bought a different set of tires (kind of hate to remove tires with only about 2K miles on them).

    Like other say, drive a GS for a day or so and see how you like it.
    One of the “Quiet Professionals”

    13 BMW R1200GS LC, 17 Ram EcoDiesel, 12 BMW 128iC (wife's).

  6. #6
    Thank you for the feedback. I was able to take a short demo ride on a GS a few weeks ago when the BMW demo truck was at a dealer. The ride was short and they put me on a standard GS and I could only manage my tip toes on the ground. That alone made it very uncomfortable for me. I'll have to try a much longer ride before I can make a decision. I have sat on a few low suspension GS's at my dealer and they feel much better.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootersteve77 View Post
    Yes, I'm planning on doing that if I can. I agree that's the best way to do it. But also looking for long term feedback. I know from experience that it can take months of riding before you really start to feel what you like or don't like about a bike.
    Before I bought my GS I had short test rides on an RT and a GS. I found the RT to be significantly less comfortable because the riding position required me to bend my knees farther. So I bought the GS and have been happy with it - over 20k so far. Only comfort mods so far are a taller windshield and a Sargent seat, which is an improvement over the stock seat.

    I can flat foot a GS with the seat in the high position. It sounds like you may have the opposite problem. An extended test ride on a lowered GS is a great excuse to go ride somewhere fun for a day or two.

    Cheers, Ken
    2015 R1200GS

  8. #8
    Registered User wbrownell9's Avatar
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    I have a wethead GSA low and love it. Traded from an RT (not RS). Transmissions are the same but the GS final drive is lower so you'll have higher RPMs for any given speed. If you ride by speed, it'll be thirstier. If you ride by RPM it'll slow you down, which suited me fine. The GSA with OEM panniers is as aerodynamic as a barn door, so that plus the lower final drive means it's about 5% thirstier than my RT. Over the last 90,000 miles I've averaged 45.25 mpg (that's odometer miles divided by pump gallons. The onboard computer is about 3% optimistic)
    2016 R1200 GSA

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by wbrownell9 View Post
    I have a wethead GSA low and love it. Traded from an RT (not RS). Transmissions are the same but the GS final drive is lower so you'll have higher RPMs for any given speed. If you ride by speed, it'll be thirstier. If you ride by RPM it'll slow you down, which suited me fine. The GSA with OEM panniers is as aerodynamic as a barn door, so that plus the lower final drive means it's about 5% thirstier than my RT. Over the last 90,000 miles I've averaged 45.25 mpg (that's odometer miles divided by pump gallons. The onboard computer is about 3% optimistic)
    I was wondering about the final drive ratio. So it revs a bit higher as I suspected. I don't mind the gas milage hit and judging by the miles that GS riders rack up by the tens of thousands, it's obviously not impacting cruising comfort :-)

    Yes, the low frame is a must for me. Not crazy about the huge square panniers, but it's part of the look of the bike, which I think is very cool. I really want the comfort of the RT, but I like the purposeful look of the GS better. Interesting that some find the GS more comfortable than the RT.

  10. #10
    Registered User 915e's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootersteve77 View Post
    I was wondering about the final drive ratio. So it revs a bit higher as I suspected. I don't mind the gas milage hit and judging by the miles that GS riders rack up by the tens of thousands, it's obviously not impacting cruising comfort :-)

    Yes, the low frame is a must for me. Not crazy about the huge square panniers, but it's part of the look of the bike, which I think is very cool. I really want the comfort of the RT, but I like the purposeful look of the GS better. Interesting that some find the GS more comfortable than the RT.
    You can always take the paniers off if you don't use them. It will also getting on/off the bike much easier.
    One of the “Quiet Professionals”

    13 BMW R1200GS LC, 17 Ram EcoDiesel, 12 BMW 128iC (wife's).

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by 915e View Post
    You can always take the paniers off if you don't use them. It will also getting on/off the bike much easier.
    Well, I'm a pack rat and always seem to have at least one of them filled with, rain gear, flat tire kit, first aid kit, phone charger, etc etc etc... the other side gets my helmet when parked, and let's not forget living in South Florida a dry towel and t-shirt are a nice thing to have after the inevitable downpour in the summer.

  12. #12
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shootersteve77 View Post
    Not crazy about the huge square panniers, .
    The hot dog boxes look better in black.

    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

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