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Thread: Tire pressure sensor replacement cost.

  1. #1

    Question Tire pressure sensor replacement cost.

    My 2008 R1200R tire pressure sensors battery's are getting weak and failing, what should I expect to pay at a dealer to have them changed out.
    I have a complete tire removal shop and can change them myself but I have no way of updating the on board system after installing them. I do not
    mind paying 3 to 4 hundred dollars to have them replaced at a authorized dealer but that is my limit. So can I replace them myself and them take it to a dealer
    to activate them and save money. I am 71 years old and not rich.
    Please advise
    Thanks Raleigh Conquest Lebanon TN
    PS will travel to save money.

  2. #2
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum.
    The rear sensor costs $234 and the front is $222.
    The dealer may not charge much to activate them but it would be best to call and ask.
    If you know someone with a GS911 they may be able to activate them.
    Lee
    2016 R1200RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  3. #3
    I had to bring my bike to the dealer to hook up the service computer to recognize the TPS after replacing the batteries on the TPS units.


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    gone.

  4. #4
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    Raleigh since you have your own tire changer, I would suggest YouTubing TPM battery change, 90 minutes labor will probably save you 3-400 dollars(price of a set of tires)

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bmwclub343 View Post
    I had to bring my bike to the dealer to hook up the service computer to recognize the TPS after replacing the batteries on the TPS units.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I have heard (second hand) that it will reset once you get the bike up and going over 30 mph, or you can reset it with a GS911. I haven't done this myself so FWIW.
    Lee A. Dickinson - Danielsville, GA USA
    Airheads #3480 | Iron Butt Assn. #8914
    1992 R100RS - 1993 K1100RS - 2013 R1200GS

  6. #6
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    BMW uses 433 MHz sensors. There are many options in the market that can spoof the original sensor's ID. No reprogramming needed for the bike itself. For example:

    https://www.amazon.com/Autel-MX-Sens.../dp/B015GY1Y8G

    https://www.amazon.com/Schrader-3350.../dp/B00TPVZNUW

  7. #7
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerphile View Post
    I have heard (second hand) that it will reset once you get the bike up and going over 30 mph, or you can reset it with a GS911. I haven't done this myself so FWIW.
    I have changed three sets in the last year and have not had luck with either.
    The new sensors are recognized, but will not activate with rapid air loss method with GS911.
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

    Be decisive, right or wrong.The road of life is paved with
    flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision~unknown

  8. #8
    On YouTube I found several videos related to replacement of BMW motorcycle TPMS. On one there is a mention of a necessary tool to activate the sensor (EL-50448 TPMS reset tool for 433 MHz), said to be available on Ebay and Amazon. Link to video -

    https://youtu.be/xAiJy4ZC-u4


    I found on Amazon the unit shown in the video (about $17)

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=AD1TREM6UBR13
    Last edited by robsryder; 04-12-2018 at 03:51 PM.

  9. #9

    Tire pressure sensor replacement cost.

    When I acquired my current 2009 R1200RT one of the things it lacked compared to the previous one was TPMS (RDC in BMW language).

    I happen to use a Garmin 395LM GPS the bike; Garmin makes tire pressure transmitters that replace the valve caps.
    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/131744

    They are compatible with the Garmin 390LM/590LM-series motorcycle GPS units; I think I paid $120 for a pair after some online shopping.

    You can set the pressure range limits on the GPS unit for alarms.

    Setup was easy.


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  10. #10
    Knight-Errant 1957mpd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerphile View Post
    Several people have had good luck removing the potting in the center of the unit and replacing the old battery with a new CR2032 battery with solder tabs. Repot it with hot melt glue or epoxy. $10 plus your time. The computer seems to reset on its own.
    I just love this. Even if it doesn't/didn't work, I admire the I WILL DO THIS MYSELF attitude. What's the worst that happen? - you wind up going to the dealer/independent and paying the pro.
    "Soló el que ensaya lo absurdo es capaz de conquistar lo imposible." Miguel de Unamuno 1905

    Mark - Las Cruces, NM - '17 R1200 GSA

  11. #11
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1957mpd View Post
    I just love this. Even if it doesn't/didn't work, I admire the I WILL DO THIS MYSELF attitude. What's the worst that happen? - you wind up going to the dealer/independent and paying the pro.
    These sensors live in a very severe environment. Vibration, bigger hits, temperature extremes, etc.

    It could very well be that the life of the rest of the components is about finished near the same time the battery is expended.

    In any event, the harsh environment precludes an easily changed battery ... it needs to be and is fairly permanently mounted.

    No automotive manufacturer anywhere has authorized or provided technician training for changing the batteries. This is, after all, a safety system.

    I'm fairly certain wheel rim mounted sensors and am more sure the spoke mounted sensors do not correspond to anything used elsewhere ... that is, not much aftermarket.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  12. #12
    Knight-Errant 1957mpd's Avatar
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    Upon reflection, I recognize the merit of Kent's observations. He is correct: tinkering with "safety" technology is attended by some risk. But in this case, my risk analysis includes consideration of what BMW charges to replace TPM sensors. $400+ so a computer scold can alert me to a tire losing air pressure makes me nostalgic for the simplicity of my /6 and /7 bikes. Fortunately, the replacement interval for TPM sensors is infrequent. During their expected lifespan, I will spend more on brake fluid flushing every two years.
    "Soló el que ensaya lo absurdo es capaz de conquistar lo imposible." Miguel de Unamuno 1905

    Mark - Las Cruces, NM - '17 R1200 GSA

  13. #13
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    I tend to look at things like TPMS with a less appreciative view than some people. This is the first bike I've had with TPMS and with the exception of my wife's new Prius, it is the only vehicle I've owned in my life with TPMS. An accurate tire pressure gauge has always been something I've valued. And being able to get down on the floor to check my tire pressure is still something I can handle.

    But I can appreciate the value of TPMS. And I'll probably appreciate it far more as I get older yet. While my tire pressure gauge will still stay accurate if I can keep it from being abused...my knees and hips may value TPMS far more in coming years.

    On the other hand, I tend to look at the cost of parts and ask why? The TPMS system BMW sells isn't that much different in technology or reliability than that offered by other companies. Just a quick 30 second search on Amazon shows me that I can get an AC Delco sensor for $17. Earlier in this thread it says that if I get one of the AC Delco sensors that transmits on a particular frequency...it is compatible with the TPMS used by BMW.

    So what causes the high cost of the BMW sensor? Could it be the letters "BMW"? "Bring More Wallet"?

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  14. #14
    Registered User jandhumphreyme's Avatar
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    I agree with Chris, I can appreciate it, but didn't want it or need it. The 10x markup is what gets me really infuriated. I understand business markups, appreciate profit and want business's to make a profit, after all that's where good wages, benefits, and research money comes from, but there is a limit to my understanding. Their is NOTHING special about these sensors to justify their cost, BMW sure didn't invent them nor do they manufacture them, so give us a little break please.
    So often times it happens that we live our lives in chains
    And we never even know we have the key

  15. #15
    Paying $60 to $120 per year for 5-10 years use of a TPMS sensor until it fails from the depletion of a $2 CR2032 cell is crazy. Declaring it a safety feature does not erase this. Suggesting that everything else in the sensor was about to die anyway is conjecture. TPMS was mandated in "light vehicles" by the TREAD Act which was formulated in response to multiple fatalities with Ford Explorers running underinflated Firestone tires. It was not mandated to motorcycles or trucks over 10,000 lbs. gross. Singing the safety song, the NHTSA rules that a dealer or repair shop may not return a vehicle to the customer if the "safety system" has been rendered inoperable. Then dealers, even some motorcycle dealers, either smelling profit or claiming fear of a $10,000 fine tell the customer that they are "required by law" to fix inoperative sensors when found. This is regardless of the fact that the TREAD Act does not apply to motorcycles and even though the NHTSA has ruled that if the sensors were "inoperable when presented" that returning the vehicle would not be considered rendering them inoperable. The dealer needs only to confirm and document that the system was "inoperable when presented" to avoid the fine. Since there is no aftermarket replacement that works with the BMW electronics, that will be about $600 including breaking down and re-fitting both tires. BMW says their sensors are good to 187 miles per hour. I'd hate to use an Amazon replacement and have it quit working at 160 miles per hour just as I ran over a nail.

    And all of this costs less than brake fluid flushes? What is the limit of a BMW rider's sense of humor? This is already way past mine, so I do not have TPMS and do my own brake fluid flushes for a couple of bucks with a GS911 and some DOT4 from the local auto parts store. How did we escape death on these things before the advent of ABS, TPMS, ASC , and DTC? The old slash 5 looks more like genius with each passing year.
    Last edited by beemerphile; 04-18-2018 at 12:19 PM.
    Lee A. Dickinson - Danielsville, GA USA
    Airheads #3480 | Iron Butt Assn. #8914
    1992 R100RS - 1993 K1100RS - 2013 R1200GS

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