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Thread: I Screwed Up. Suggestions?

  1. #16
    If I have an "iffy" head on a fastener - hex, Allen, Torx, or Phillips - a small dab of valve grinding compound often helps things grip. I haven't hand lapped valves in 25 years but still have a bit of grinding compound among the stuff on the shelf.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  2. #17
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nrpetersen View Post
    I have found that having anything that resembles an antiseize (such as oil, grease, paint etc) on a Phillips driver will greatly enhance the tendency to cam out/strip out. I would assume a shallow hex key or similar would do the same. This is the sort of thing where the user gets only one chance - better make it a good one. Those fairing screws have a super shallow hex socket in them which makes them potentially marginal in a corrosive application.

    Of course grit helps too according to others though I have not used it.
    Good points, thanks.
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  3. #18
    Curmudgeon nrpetersen's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    The not widely recognized effect of paint as an anti-seize is left over from aircraft experience, where say a wing tank cover is held with a lot of painted #8-32 structural screws that haven't been out of their holes for many years. What a mess when the Phillips screwdriver cams out and there is no easy access to the back side for nut plate replacement. It becomes one of those cases where there's a lot of work generated if the first try misses.
    Retired w 2005 K1200LT, 2000 R1100RT, & 1975 R90/6

  4. #19
    Registered User K7GLE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Have seen a lot of aftermarket stainless screws gall/sieze in clips and threaded wells of 1100's.
    They also tend to cross-thread because they have squared-off tips rather than the slightly tapered tips found on the OEM parts, and so are harder to get started fairly. Not a big deal on the ones that go into the spring nuts, which can be replaced, but a real stinker in the blind holes on the tank.
    - Glenn
    2000 R1100RT (current)
    1982 R100RT (traded)
    1970 BSA A65T, 1969 Honda CB350, 1967 Honda CB160 all fondly remembered

  5. #20
    Curmudgeon nrpetersen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K7GLE View Post
    They also tend to cross-thread because they have squared-off tips rather than the slightly tapered tips found on the OEM parts, and so are harder to get started fairly. Not a big deal on the ones that go into the spring nuts, which can be replaced, but a real stinker in the blind holes on the tank.
    The screw tip can be made conical by holding a corresponding metric nut tightly in a vise grip and guiding the screw rotation with an appropriate tool/key. This allows you to address a grinding wheel to get the desired cone end. Polish the end and thread entries then with the wire wheel. Those blind tank threads are especially critical and need a conical screw end.
    Retired w 2005 K1200LT, 2000 R1100RT, & 1975 R90/6

  6. #21
    Registered User jsouth's Avatar
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    Stock screws (or screws modified to be rounded on the end) are vital. However, even with stock screws, on the screws that thread into the tank I find that it helps to avoid ANY misalignment of tupperware and threaded hole. I look at the alignment and press or pull on the tupperware with one hand until there is perfect alignment BEFORE inserting the screw, and hold it there until the screw is threaded in. If the tupperware is not aligned well (and it never is to start with) there are off-center pressures applied to the screw that will strip out or cross thread the threaded hole in the tank.
    2000 BMW R1100RS | Past bikes: 97 Suzuki GS500E, 82 Suzuki GS1100E, 07 Suzuki V-Strom 650

  7. #22
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    It's all in the way you hold your tongue...........
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  8. #23
    Registered User K7GLE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSAddict View Post
    It's all in the way you hold your tongue...........
    At the risk of mentioning something everyone already knows: I used to tell my son, when starting anything with threads (screws, jar lids, etc) to turn them backwards until you feel the "click" when the threads line up.
    - Glenn
    2000 R1100RT (current)
    1982 R100RT (traded)
    1970 BSA A65T, 1969 Honda CB350, 1967 Honda CB160 all fondly remembered

  9. #24
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K7GLE View Post
    At the risk of mentioning something everyone already knows: I used to tell my son, when starting anything with threads (screws, jar lids, etc) to turn them backwards until you feel the "click" when the threads line up.
    Especially applies to threads in plastic parts.
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  10. #25
    Curmudgeon nrpetersen's Avatar
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    I also made a hex driver for fairing screws by cutting the end off a large old screwdriver. I sawed the end off the appropriate fairing screw hex key to get a length of hex stock, then drilled the end of the old screwdriver 1/8 inch dia by plenty deep & hammered the metric hex key into the end of the screwdriver.

    Having a long handled driver that can be pushed on & that will hold a fairing screw in desired alignment really helps. It is the one tool I take with me on my R1100RT. Of course there are commercial equivalents but the extra length really helps. Otherwise it becomes agonizing to drive and align things with only the metric factory/tool kit hex key.
    Retired w 2005 K1200LT, 2000 R1100RT, & 1975 R90/6

  11. #26
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nrpetersen View Post
    I also made a hex driver for fairing screws by cutting the end off a large old screwdriver. I sawed the end off the appropriate fairing screw hex key to get a length of hex stock, then drilled the end of the old screwdriver 1/8 inch dia by plenty deep & hammered the metric hex key into the end of the screwdriver.

    Having a long handled driver that can be pushed on & that will hold a fairing screw in desired alignment really helps. It is the one tool I take with me on my R1100RT. Of course there are commercial equivalents but the extra length really helps. Otherwise it becomes agonizing to drive and align things with only the metric factory/tool kit hex key.
    That's just too much work for me... I have a couple of these one of which is left in the glove box of my 1100RT at all times. Never an issue with angles or over torquing which happens with ratchets and other tools easily if not careful. This tool is around 8 bucks on eBay and maybe even cheaper at your FLAPS or tool vendor.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  12. #27
    Registered User K7GLE's Avatar
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    Ditto - and one in the garage toolbox, and that other one around here somewhere that I just had a minute ago...

    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    I have a couple of these one of which is left in the glove box of my 1100RT at all times.
    - Glenn
    2000 R1100RT (current)
    1982 R100RT (traded)
    1970 BSA A65T, 1969 Honda CB350, 1967 Honda CB160 all fondly remembered

  13. #28
    I have a fairly complete set of those ball-end drivers. I also have a rather complete set of T handle drivers with a straight-cut end. For starting fasteners I prefer the straight cut drivers because that eliminates most any tendency to wobble. Once started the ball end drivers are wonderful, as they are for removing fasteners.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  14. #29
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Torex fasteners make things much easier. My FJR uses allen head fasteners for the body work and I have replaced most with torex fasteners; made things much easier. I truly dislike allen head hardware.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl's MT Outpost
    2017 R1200GSA & 2013 FJR

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I have a fairly complete set of those ball-end drivers. I also have a rather complete set of T handle drivers with a straight-cut end. For starting fasteners I prefer the straight cut drivers because that eliminates most any tendency to wobble. Once started the ball end drivers are wonderful, as they are for removing fasteners.
    I have a full set of the Wera Ball end drivers. I would be lost without them.
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