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Thread: stripped oil pan bolts

  1. #1

    stripped oil pan bolts

    I have 4 longer bolts replaced by the previous owner on the oil pan

    sure enough... when I switched location and put a stock bolt into that hole... its stripped.... thus the reason the previous owner put a long one

    once I removed the pan and saw where the bolts mount on flanges... I don't think most of them would benefit from a longer bolt
    I'll need to double check and take it off again... but am betting that the 1 I found stripped already goes into the block in deeper location than the tabs that most of the bolts thread into.

    Anyways.... is there a good thread or article on this
    it make sense to fix these now while the motor is out, rather than later in the chassis after I have an oil leak

    I'm assuming time-serts are preferred... over heli-coils... but would love to see how others have handled this task

    I apologize in that I did use the search feature without success and am asking a question that has probably already been answered, but I was unable to find
    1971 R75/5 (m6x20mm bolt, with 1.0 pitch)

    brant

  2. #2
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Brant -

    Matt Parkhouse covered this in the February 2015 Owners News...unfortunately, the MOA archives only go back to August 2015. Snowbum talks about the issue on this page:

    http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/pangasket.htm

    In his Step-by-Step section in the top half of the page, paragraph number 5 discusses how it's done.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
    Thank you Kurt!

    you are an encyclopedia!

    I decided to go against snowbum's advice.
    in that I just ordered a time sert kit

    over the years, I can't count the number of times a heli-coil gave me problems 5 years after install. Backing out or backing in.
    I've had 1 (car motor/magnesium block) pull a time sert ever.....

    figured I want to keep this one a while... and although it cost more... the time sert will probably last for ever
    (fix it once and then forget about it)

    brant
    Last edited by brant914; 03-06-2018 at 08:18 PM.

  4. #4
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    Time-sert is always my first choice over helicoil in an engine block. I've done hundreds of both. Good luck with your project.

  5. #5
    The PO (previous owner) of this bike was an idiot. I just tested all of the pan bolts with the correct length of bolt/engagement

    5 stripped bolts.
    Good thing there are 5 serts included in a kit!

    Did a little hand polishing while I was thereB6D5AB36-C064-414F-A747-062CC5B313BA.jpg

  6. #6
    Curmudgeon nrpetersen's Avatar
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    And I'll bet they were probably previously tightened with a torque wrench too.

    We Yankees have to be careful of torque wrenches because they are usually made with too-long-a-handle to give good wrench "feel". Those extra long wrench handles and metric threads (which us Yankees are not really familiar with either), and maybe even a published units conversion error make tightening the finer threads of metric fasteners (vs inch) quick to strip out threads in aluminum.
    Retired w 2005 K1200LT, 2000 R1100RT, & 1975 R90/6

  7. #7
    Rally Rat 1074's Avatar
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    My all time record is 12 stripped bolts and I think the gasket was glued on both sides! never had a problem with Heli-Coils. Maybe just luck. Maybe meticulous cleaning and insertion.
    Boxerbruce

  8. #8
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    We Yankees have to be careful of torque wrenches because they are usually made with too-long-a-handle to give good wrench "feel".
    That's why I always use a break-over "inch pound" calibrated wrench on 6mm fasteners.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden
    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner
    1963 Dnepr

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by 1074 View Post
    My all time record is 12 stripped bolts and I think the gasket was glued on both sides! never had a problem with Heli-Coils. Maybe just luck. Maybe meticulous cleaning and insertion.


    12 at once... that has to be a record.


    someone on here is going to yell at me.
    but honestly when something is below 10ft.lbs.
    I'd rather just use the hand-calibration-torque tool
    I hate stripping things

    that said, I'll look up the torque value and use care once my Serts arrive and are installed.

  10. #10
    I recall a post a while back - maybe on this forum - most likely someplace else, where the poster wrote that he had set his torque wrench and stripped the threads on a fastener. Darn! Then he repeated it on a second fastener. After the third try, again stripping threads as he proceeded he rechecked the specifications and discovered that there is a difference between newton meters and foot pounds.

    I commented at the time that I thought he ought to have checked things after the first stripped threads instead of after the third.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  11. #11
    Registered User
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    Oil pan

    It's on the list I have some drips from the oil pan on my slash seven always comforting to have something to look forward to before doing the job.

  12. #12
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Somewhere there was mention of “mechanics feel” when tightening fasteners. I like 1/4” drive on small, 3/8” drive on medium and 1/2” drive on most larger- all ratchet handles.
    I dooooo have a 600ft lb torque wrench for some of the big stuff
    OM
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  13. #13
    I prefer mechanics feel when below 10ft/lbs.

    I will even put a bolt into the vice and use a torque wrench a couple of times to help train my feel
    then move to the item with that muscle memory and torque the pattern of light weight fasteners.

    I don't trust most torque wrenches (the ones I own)... when something is a very low torque rating.

  14. #14
    Registered User jandhumphreyme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brant914 View Post
    I prefer mechanics feel when below 10ft/lbs.

    I will even put a bolt into the vice and use a torque wrench a couple of times to help train my feel
    then move to the item with that muscle memory and torque the pattern of light weight fasteners.

    I don't trust most torque wrenches (the ones I own)... when something is a very low torque rating.
    It's interesting you mention "training my feel". My father in law was an aircraft mechanic during WW2, told me on numerous occasions that's how he was trained by the Navy, repeated practice with a torque wrench on the bench to "train the hand" to feel the correct torque values, of course they used the torque wrench on critical components.
    So often times it happens that we live our lives in chains
    And we never even know we have the key

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by 1074 View Post
    My all time record is 12 stripped bolts and I think the gasket was glued on both sides! never had a problem with Heli-Coils. Maybe just luck. Maybe meticulous cleaning and insertion.
    Ditto. As a machinist I have used literally hundreds of several kinds, and I never had a problem with heli-coils. I always thought the biggest advantage of using heli-coils is that you don't have to enlarge the hole as much as the others. Never stripped one - ever, and never had one move or back out either.
    "The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't change every time congress meets." - Will Rogers

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