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Thread: New bikes age fast

  1. #61
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExGMan View Post
    At age 73 I also was starting to be concerned about what seemed to be the increasing difficulty I was having moving my RT around with muscle power. In the Fall of 2017, I had a talk with a personal trainer at the YMCA to which I belong in Boston. She created a list of nine exercises which I have been doing about 3X a week for a few months now. They're all on CYBEX weight machines. I have almost doubled the weights I'm using in the four months since I started. I took the RT out twice in late February for a total of about 100 miles of riding. Everything I did on the bike which required muscle power was substantially easier, leading me to conclude I'd really let myself go. I try to perform the routine every other day when I'm in Boston.
    That is GREAT advice! I retired a year ago at 61 and just joined a gym for just that reason. Keeping in shape is more and more important as we age.
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2012 R1200GSA Magma Red!
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

  2. #62
    Is this thread about "New Bikes Age Fast" or Old Guys Age Fast? I somehow lost track.

    p.s. I plan to tour this summer on a new G310GS.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by gsinnc View Post
    Pretty sure most of us don't "expect" to drop our bikes but it can happen to any of us and is at time totally out of our control. Loose gravel, oil, anti-freeze, rainy slick gas stations all can result in a drop and it happens to the best most careful riders.

    I too am 6'3" tall and have ridden over 20K on Harley Ultra Limiteds. There have been times when getting that sucker off the side stand was a big effort on a slight slope. Not so with any of my BMW's but weight is well weight.

    Hope your luck continues and you have many safe and happy miles.
    Thanks Ed. I'm completely aware of these things, which is why I can say w/ confidence I'll likely not drop the bike as I've committed to keeping up the habits required to succeed. Now if suddenly become dizzy or faint, all bets are off of course, but that would be true on an F800GT or an R1200RT. If I ever drop the bike it will not be the end of anyone's world, including my own. I'm certain plenty of riders don't commit to what it takes. Moreover, it will not be brute strength the prevents a drop since I have no brute strength outside of reasonably strong legs--it's 100% technique and committing to it, and that is a conscious choice.

    Here's a hypothetical for you Ed: if someone walked up to you and said, 'I'll give you 1000 to 1 odds you will drop your RT sometime during the next 100K miles. If you don't drop the bike, I'll give you $100,000. If you do drop the bike, you give me $100.' Would you take the bet? If so, would it change in any way how you manage low speed riding? IOW, do you always commit to maximizing risk reduction for dropping your bike?

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Is this thread about "New Bikes Age Fast" or Old Guys Age Fast? I somehow lost track.

    p.s. I plan to tour this summer on a new G310GS.

  5. #65
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpbmw1953 View Post
    Thanks Ed. I'm completely aware of these things, which is why I can say w/ confidence I'll likely not drop the bike as I've committed to keeping up the habits required to succeed. Now if suddenly become dizzy or faint, all bets are off of course, but that would be true on an F800GT or an R1200RT. If I ever drop the bike it will not be the end of anyone's world, including my own. I'm certain plenty of riders don't commit to what it takes. Moreover, it will not be brute strength the prevents a drop since I have no brute strength outside of reasonably strong legs--it's 100% technique and committing to it, and that is a conscious choice.

    Here's a hypothetical for you Ed: if someone walked up to you and said, 'I'll give you 1000 to 1 odds you will drop your RT sometime during the next 100K miles. If you don't drop the bike, I'll give you $100,000. If you do drop the bike, you give me $100.' Would you take the bet? If so, would it change in any way how you manage low speed riding? IOW, do you always commit to maximizing risk reduction for dropping your bike?
    Without a doubt! You bet I do. Where I park, what gas pump I pull up to, how I part at a gas pump, what toll lane I enter, how I enter the toll lane, where in the lane I plant my foot, and on and on. BUT ... I still know it is possible to drop my bike at any time. No matter how careful. I have seen it happen in my short 25 years of riding. And by some very skilled riders. You can only plan so much but there is always something you don't plan for.

    It is similar to the saying about having a bike accident ... there are those who have had one and those who will (or something like that)
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2012 R1200GSA Magma Red!
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by gsinnc View Post
    Without a doubt! You bet I do. Where I park, what gas pump I pull up to, how I part at a gas pump, what toll lane I enter, how I enter the toll lane, where in the lane I plant my foot, and on and on. BUT ... I still know it is possible to drop my bike at any time. No matter how careful. I have seen it happen in my short 25 years of riding. And by some very skilled riders. You can only plan so much but there is always something you don't plan for.

    It is similar to the saying about having a bike accident ... there are those who have had one and those who will (or something like that)
    I know it sounds like I don't, like I'm way too overconfident, but I understand it, completely. It will, of course, be the unexpected that leads to a drop. I only make the comments publicly to give me something to try to aim for.

    I dropped the F800GT on the first day of using new riding boots w/ a tall toe box for my diabetic hammer toes: it caused me to manifest a significant drop risk that had existed all along but that I never recognized, and that never materialized until I had the new boots. So those things happen, the unexpected, unforeseen risks. So does this relate to curb weight? Nope, I dropped the 470lb machine as just as I would have the 604lb machine, and very likely a 350lb machine as well were this event to happen as it did to me. That drop caused me learn more about low speed management techniques, and as well practicing them always when riding.

    Moreover, I couldn't get the 470lb bike back upright w/o help, and that was after attempting the push it up w/ my legs using the butt on seat trick. At 6'4" and with F800GT virtually flat on the garage floor, I could not get my knees into the best position to help walk it up. I think we can agree that more weight doesn't add much except more weight but in reality is a relatively minor issue at 604lbs, for me, at 6'4" tall, even w/ very marginal upper body strength. I also exercise regularly as well, but the nature of sarcopenia is that at best you can only slow down progressive muscle wasting. I think when RT literally becomes too heavy to move around the garage, which it will if I live that long, it will likely be the end of my riding days. So I'll leave it with how I started it: the only bike that will pry me off of RTW is a substantially lighter version of it (comfort/tech/perf), which does not exist in any machines currently offered.
    Last edited by ncpbmw1953; 03-13-2018 at 06:58 PM.

  7. #67
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    I guess I'm ageing at the same rate as the last year R68.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I plan to tour this summer on a new G310GS.
    It's interesting how many riders today are convinced they need at least a 700cc bike to travel more than 50 miles from home.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by 43912 View Post
    It's interesting how many riders today are convinced they need at least a 700cc bike to travel more than 50 miles from home.
    A couple of years ago we ran into a young man on a Kawasaki 250 Super Sherpa waiting out a thunderstorm near Grand Junction, CO. He was traveling from New York to California. We talked a bit about the Texas Big Bend where we live anad the Sherpa I owned. . We went to a rally at the Sipapu Ski Area in New Mexivco that coming weekend. On the way home we rolled into Roswell, NM and sure enough there he was. We chatted a bit and we found a motel and he went off to camp. Back home a few days later the phone rang. It was him - exploring Big Bend National Park before he headed west to Presidio and onwards to California.

    So - as far as I am concerned nobody needs 1200 or 1600 or more CCs to travel. It is a mindset, not a requirement.

    My 310 has a wonderful sweet spot at 70 mph and tops out at 90 or so. That is enough to get me to Canada this summer.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 03-14-2018 at 03:14 AM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    My 310 has a wonderful sweet spot at 70 mph and tops out at 90 or so. That is enough to get me to Canada this summer.
    A rider with the screen name of DaBinChe rode his 110cc Elite from California to Hyder, AK, then to New Orleans and on to Jacksonville, FL and then back to California a couple of years ago on the scooter cannonball, camping much of the way. The Honda did OK and apparently so did he!

    Your 310 has more touring capability than most bikes of any size had up to the 60's or so.

    I wonder if smaller/simpler bikes somehow don't seem to age as quickly as the larger more complicated ones?
    Last edited by OldCamper; 03-14-2018 at 02:11 AM.

  11. #71
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    So - as far as I am concerned nobody needs 1200 or 1600 or more CCs to travel. It is a mindset, not a requirement.
    Paul, I wholly agree with you regarding big bikes are not necessarily necessary for long trips.

    In '71 my wife and I took a three month honeymoon. We bought two new massive 49cc Honda mopeds in Edinburgh, Scotland. On those bikes we toured around Scotland, England's Lake District, the west coast, over to France and across the Alps and Pyrenees into Spain, back into France and eventually to London, England. We travelled with very little gear on back roads. It was a blast!
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Niagara Riders & Knights of the Roundel #333

  12. #72
    Registered User gsinnc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    A couple of years ago we ran into a young man on a Kawasaki 250 Super Sherpa waiting out a thunderstorm near Grand Junction, CO. He was traveling from New York to California. We talked a bit about the Texas Big Bend where we live. We went to a rally at the Sipapu Ski Area in New Mexivco that coming weekend. On the way home we rolled into Roswell, NM and sure enough there he was. We chatted a bit and we found a motel and he went off to camp. Back home a few days later the phone rang. It was him - exploring Big Bend National Park before he headed west to Presidio and onwards to California.

    So - as far as I am concerned nobody needs 1200 or 1600 or more CCs to travel. It is a mindset, not a requirement.

    My 310 has a wonderful sweet spot at 70 mph and tops out at 90 or so. That is enough to get me to Canada this summer.
    Well said !!

    And I recall when I started riding a 500cc to 700cc was a mid-size bike. 1100cc's was huge.

    I ran across this one night whey I was cruising the internet for interesting motorcycle stuff. I thought it fascinating and truly the adventure spirit.

    http://singlecylinderpsyche.com
    Ed Apelian
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2012 R1200GSA Magma Red!
    2016 R1200RT- Platinum Bronze

  13. #73
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    Back around '95, was at Performance Plus BMW in Memphis, Tn. on a Saturday afternoon. They just put a new tire on for him. He told me he was generally headed toward the UP of Mich. He was pulling a trailor with a flag. He said he wasn't in any kind of hurry, just meandering about here and there, kinda headed that way. A week later I seen him in up state lower Mich. headed north. U really don't even need a motorcycle at all. A scooter will do just fine.

  14. #74
    About 3 years ago we were camped at the City Park in Chouteau Montana. First we met a guy down from the mountains, in his pickup camper with his dog, doing a resupply run before heading back to the American outback. Next we met a lady from France, riding her bicycle from Minnesota to the west coast. Finally we met a young lady from New York, late of her home country, China on her Vespa scooter. It was a somewhat magical evening as we all five sat around a campfire and exchanged stories and good wishes. Everybody should experience such an evening. It is worth more than a person can imagine.

    Later, the lady on the scooter and her guy friend spent a few days with us here in Texas before heading off for the west coast. We still stay in contact with them.

    There are two key stories here: friends are where you find them; and, 250cc Vespas can conquer the continent. Bet on it!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #75
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barryg View Post
    Back around '95, was at Performance Plus BMW in Memphis, Tn. on a Saturday afternoon. They just put a new tire on for him. He told me he was generally headed toward the UP of Mich. He was pulling a trailor with a flag. He said he wasn't in any kind of hurry, just meandering about here and there, kinda headed that way. A week later I seen him in up state lower Mich. headed north. U really don't even need a motorcycle at all. A scooter will do just fine.
    He was on a Honda Helix scooter. Sorry, I forgot to mention what he was riding.

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