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Thread: How does it feel, satisfying your hunger to tour

  1. #1

    How does it feel, satisfying your hunger to tour

    What is it about going on a long, multi-day tour that makes us want to keep going back? For me, I see daily life as doing what you need to do to survive, we work, we go about doing our chores, or running around doing what others expect of us for various reasons, and all the while, deep inside, we feel like something isn't being satisfied. Like a tiny hunger that won't go away. Money doesn't fix it, love doesn't even fix it. But when I get on the road and know that I have several days of free adventure and exploration, just me, nothing expected of me. I don't need to be anywhere, do anything I don't want to do. It is 100% free time, just for me to go wherever I want, drift wherever the wind blows me, and survive on only what I can carry. That is when that tiny hunger feels fulfilled. Satisfied. I am at true inner peace with myself and my life. A feeling of euphoria sometimes wells up from deep within while on the road on such a trip and I find myself grinning like an idiot while screaming down the road. Good thing that helmet is on and nobody can see what's really going on there or they might commit me!
    DSCN1919.jpg

  2. #2
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    I did two trips this summer that were on my post-retirement ride list that included some incredible sights. Yet, I did not find them as satisfying as I had thought I would. They were "bucket list" rides that most people would love to do. But I realized that staying in a motel alone, was not my idea of a great time, not when my wife of 42 years was at home. (No, she won't ride.) I covered a lot of miles and had some great experiences, but unless I'm with some other people who I can share the experience with, it leaves me feeling still empty. We'll see what next summer's trip is like. I'm already planning a trip up to Banff and Jasper next July with two other buddies.

    We each find our fulfillment in different ways. As much as I love riding, I realized that I was looking forward to the fall. Most of my prison ministries take a break during the summer months. But with September, I started back into them again and that's what really gives me the enjoyment.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

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    Trip

    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    I did two trips this summer that were on my post-retirement ride list that included some incredible sights. Yet, I did not find them as satisfying as I had thought I would. They were "bucket list" rides that most people would love to do. But I realized that staying in a motel alone, was not my idea of a great time, not when my wife of 42 years was at home. (No, she won't ride.) I covered a lot of miles and had some great experiences, but unless I'm with some other people who I can share the experience with, it leaves me feeling still empty. We'll see what next summer's trip is like. I'm already planning a trip up to Banff and Jasper next July with two other buddies.

    We each find our fulfillment in different ways. As much as I love riding, I realized that I was looking forward to the fall. Most of my prison ministries take a break during the summer months. But with September, I started back into them again and that's what really gives me the enjoyment.

    Chris
    Let your wife pick the destination and drive Pull a trailer and bike you won't get as much riding as you like but happy wife happy life

  4. #4
    Registered User wkuwiz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 179212 View Post
    Let your wife pick the destination and drive Pull a trailer and bike you won't get as much riding as you like but happy wife happy life
    Or, the alternative is to have her ride her own bike with you! Enjoy!
    IMG_4937.jpg
    CW
    2001 RT, '06 F650GS Dakar, '14 1200RT
    Lots of tires and fluids!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    ...We each find our fulfillment in different ways. As much as I love riding, I realized that I was looking forward to the fall. Most of my prison ministries take a break during the summer months. But with September, I started back into them again and that's what really gives me the enjoyment.

    Chris
    I appreciate the suggestions. I really do. I wish. But my wife has sat on each bike I've owned...once...on the center stand...with the engine off. Chuckle...I envy those of you who have wives who will ride with you.

    But where I really find my fulfillment is in serving God, whether it is in church during the week, or in the prison. And...I get to be with my wife. It's a win-win. And since I ride my bike everywhere, rain or shine...it is a win-win-win.

    I have to admit the last hours of my SS1000 going west on I-90 across Eastern Washington weren't as bad as I thought they would be. I just sat back, pointed the bike at the Cascades and marveled at the beauty of God's Creation. The miles went by very quickly. Unfortunately, I still had to get across Snoqualmie Pass, through construction at night after about 900 miles of riding and with rain coming on. But that earlier part was the best part of the trip for me.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  6. #6
    Left Coast Rider
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    I've done more riding this year than I have in the past 5 years since I decided to "call it a day" and stopped working. Several overnight trips, a couple of 4 dayers, and one 8 day multi-thousand kilometer trip. Those plus a 7 day solo car trip to a family event.

    I do agree with daboo when he says he didn't / doesn't enjoy staying in a hotel alone. I felt the same way the first time I set off on my own. In fact, I came home early from that first trip. The thing is, I tried to do it all at once - planned a multi-day trip to places I had never been. What I should have done was do a couple of over-nighters, then a couple of 3 day rides, and then perhaps a 5 day ride, you know, worked myself into it. What I find now is that not only do I enjoy travelling alone, I find I meet people much more easily than I did before and those are the most interesting parts of my trips. Of course I much prefer to ride with up to three other riders but now, if I feel like going somewhere, I don't let the lack of someone to share the ride hold me back.

    One last thing: I am extraordinarily fortunate to have a wife who used to ride and who understands what riding means to me.

  7. #7
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    Yeah, I'm fortunate too to have a wife that understands what riding means to me. She doesn't give me any grief at all, and in fact encourages me.

    I'm used to doing long day trips. Ten, sometimes 12 hours away. I'll usually head off to somewhere like Mt. Baker and do a couple hours of hiking, then head home. My first multi-week trip this summer was with a fellow on a Goldwing. We got along fine and it was good to ride with him. I was home for about a week and a half before heading out to Spearfish, SD. The time seemed too short and I really would've liked to have spent another week at home before heading out like that.

    I guess I'm just not like the OP, richardus, who made it sound so wonderful. Sorry to have hijacked your thread, Richard. I'll go retire to the sidelines and lurk.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  8. #8
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    To answer the question: WONDERFUL.

    Since I retired I've done multiple solo trips around the US, Canada and Europe (with one other rider part of the time.) I've found I really enjoy the solo experience.

    Having no one to answer to, no one to worry about makes for a liberating experience to me. The other part of the solo experience is - people talk to you. It's actually unusual to stop - even just for gas - and not have someone come over to chat. Sometimes they spot the NJ plate and ask how I got there, sometimes they own a bike, or owned one, or their dad owned one. Sometimes they're simply curious about the old dude riding alone in a space-suit so far from home. Solo riding lets me choose where I go, where I stop, where I sleep, where I eat - it sounds selfish, but it really makes for me - a great trip.

    Ted Simon and I were sitting on my back porch during one of his "man who came to dinner" visits.. we were drinking some good British beer (there actually is such a thing..) and he asked me if I rode in a group or alone, and which I liked. At that time - it was pretty much a mix. I'd done a few 1,500 mile trips with other people, but no real extended trips. Ted said he liked riding alone. He said (direct quote): "I like it because I don't have to be Ted Simon, I can be whoever I want to be.." and he was absolutely right. Since then - cross-country and back isn't a biggie, Nova Scotia is a short jaunt, head to New Orleans? Sure.. Circle a Great Lake or two? Yup. I've grown to really enjoy my extended solo trips on the bike. I am lucky enough to have a wife who doesn't object - she has said I come back in a much better mood after a long ride. And I think she's right.

    My hints to making a go of long solo rides: (1) Make every day an adventure - find something interesting to explore. Worlds biggest ball of aluminum foil? That's worth a days ride.. (2) Have no set time/destination to be anywhere. (3) Make motel reservations no further than 1 day in advance (and I usually make them around 3PM the same day). (4) Be open to others. (5) Say Hello and smile a lot. (6) Stop when you want to - not because you have to. (7) Share the ride - Facebook is great for doing a spontaneous sort of "blog" of a trip like this. A few photos, a bit of description and your friends will join in the ride - virtually. (8) Try new food (I'm sometimes guilty of having the same waffle breakfast and Subway lunch - gotta try to break that habit..) Dinner is never at a chain if I can help it (I think I ate at Cracker-Barrel once on my last 30 day ride..) (9) Don't avoid large cities - take them on head-on. They are really not all that hard to ride in safely, and business class hotel rooms are chump change on a Saturday night. (10) Go out of your way to talk to other riders. You'd be surprised at the good info you can get that way.. (11) Ignore the warnings that the "next state is awful" or "it's too dangerous over there.." - they're always overblown in my experience. (12) Avoid interstates if at all possible. There are almost always parallel roads, or the "old road".. take those, they're a world more interesting, and there aren't the convoys of trucks on them. (13)* Finally - do it NOW. No one is promised tomorrow..

    And keep the rubber side down.. thinking now about next spring's trip...

    BTW - Richardus - I noticed your photo.. this one is from Border-Inn, at the state line of Nevada/Utah - on the "Loneliest Road" - Rt 50:

    IMG_20170611_105937916.jpg

    That BMW maxi-scooter had NY plates on it..

    Never got to meet the chap riding it - wish I had - I'm sure it's a great story..

    border inn1.jpg

    border inn2.jpg

    * 13 was fixed.. it used to be the 2nd 12..
    Last edited by deilenberger; 10-11-2017 at 01:28 AM. Reason: Fixed numbering
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  9. #9

    Great responses

    Im loving the responses from you guys. True everyone has a different appetite for their own personal fulfillment. I also agree that it's important to make yourself stop. At anything that
    seems even remotely interesting. Most of us are "programmed" to get where we are going, get the job done as soon as possible. We need to practice having all the time in the world, more
    difficult than it sounds. Often I will get on the bike and see an interesting road, or spot that could warrant a stop but I hesitate or pass it by only because I "havent ridden long enough". I need to break that habit. There are no rules. Nobody said you have to do X number of miles before a stop is warranted. Who cares if you have only been riding ten minutes? Stop, take pictures. It's the journey, not the destination. And yes maybe you have a long way to go that day, but no hotel or campground is going to deny you simply because you were a few hours later than expected. And I promise if you do it this way, you will be less fatigued at the end of your day's journey. In this pic I stopped in a small native town called Mindemoya on Manitoulin Island for no other reason than I saw a sign that said "milkshakes" and it was super hot out. I ended up not only meeting, talking to and seeing interesting people (including what Im convinced was the REAL Minniehaha) but created a memory that I still think about all the time. It's the simple moments when you weren't really doing anything that special that are the most easily remembered, and end up being the most special, for some reason!
    FB_IMG_1506274283356.jpg
    I feel... ageless when I ride. I don't feel like an old guy ever when riding. My body doesn't feel it either. I don't feel young, I don't feel old. I just feel like... me.
    I too, am blessed with a wife that lets me do what I enjoy. And even though she has gone on a few tours with me, it's not really her thing. So she lets me go on these
    trips with best wishes. Wife approved.

    Deilenburger: I thought that was your scooter at first lol. I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one with this crazy idea! After just getting back from a 3500km trip on mine, I can
    honestly say it performed reliably, and nothing feels cooler than passing a truck and six cars at once with it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    To answer the question: WONDERFUL.

    Since I retired I've done multiple solo trips around the US, Canada and Europe (with one other rider part of the time.) I've found I really enjoy the solo experience.

    Having no one to answer to, no one to worry about makes for a liberating experience to me. The other part of the solo experience is - people talk to you. It's actually unusual to stop - even just for gas - and not have someone come over to chat. Sometimes they spot the NJ plate and ask how I got there, sometimes they own a bike, or owned one, or their dad owned one. Sometimes they're simply curious about the old dude riding alone in a space-suit so far from home. Solo riding lets me choose where I go, where I stop, where I sleep, where I eat - it sounds selfish, but it really makes for me - a great trip.

    Ted Simon and I were sitting on my back porch during one of his "man who came to dinner" visits.. we were drinking some good British beer (there actually is such a thing..) and he asked me if I rode in a group or alone, and which I liked. At that time - it was pretty much a mix. I'd done a few 1,500 mile trips with other people, but no real extended trips. Ted said he liked riding alone. He said (direct quote): "I like it because I don't have to be Ted Simon, I can be whoever I want to be.." and he was absolutely right. Since then - cross-country and back isn't a biggie, Nova Scotia is a short jaunt, head to New Orleans? Sure.. Circle a Great Lake or two? Yup. I've grown to really enjoy my extended solo trips on the bike. I am lucky enough to have a wife who doesn't object - she has said I come back in a much better mood after a long ride. And I think she's right.

    My hints to making a go of long solo rides: (1) Make every day an adventure - find something interesting to explore. Worlds biggest ball of aluminum foil? That's worth a days ride.. (2) Have no set time/destination to be anywhere. (3) Make motel reservations no further than 1 day in advance (and I usually make them around 3PM the same day). (4) Be open to others. (5) Say Hello and smile a lot. (6) Stop when you want to - not because you have to. (7) Share the ride - Facebook is great for doing a spontaneous sort of "blog" of a trip like this. A few photos, a bit of description and your friends will join in the ride - virtually. (8) Try new food (I'm sometimes guilty of having the same waffle breakfast and Subway lunch - gotta try to break that habit..) Dinner is never at a chain if I can help it (I think I ate at Cracker-Barrel once on my last 30 day ride..) (9) Don't avoid large cities - take them on head-on. They are really not all that hard to ride in safely, and business class hotel rooms are chump change on a Saturday night. (10) Go out of your way to talk to other riders. You'd be surprised at the good info you can get that way.. (11) Ignore the warnings that the "next state is awful" or "it's too dangerous over there.." - they're always overblown in my experience. (12) Avoid interstates if at all possible. There are almost always parallel roads, or the "old road".. take those, they're a world more interesting, and there aren't the convoys of trucks on them. (12) Finally - do it NOW. No one is promised tomorrow..

    And keep the rubber side down.. thinking now about next spring's trip...
    Spot on, Don. Your 12 (actually 13) points are exactly what I try to do. Okay, I don't log onto Facebook while traveling, but I sometimes put up pics and comments as soon as I get back. And your comments about Ted Simon -- Ted has spent several nights at our house. A better houseguest would be hard to find. I've kept in touch w/Ted ever since I first met him, back in the late '90's. A "Ted" anecdote -- just before Ted left on his second trip around the world, the telephone rang. My wife answered. The voice on the other end said, "I'll be coming through Birmingham, and I wonder if you have room for me." My wife answered, "Sure! When should we expect you?" "Next Tuesday, about 3pm" "Great! By the way, who is this?" "Oh, it's Ted Simon!" "Great, see you Tuesday". She never missed a beat, even though she didn't have a clue who she was talking to.

    (And yes, she "lets" me take one or two extended trips each year. Did I mention that I have the best wife in the world?)
    J Goertz
    BMW MOAL
    2015 BMW R1200RT
    2012 Triumph Bonneville SE

  11. #11
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgoertz View Post
    Spot on, Don. Your 12 (actually 13) points are exactly what I try to do. Okay, I don't log onto Facebook while traveling, but I sometimes put up pics and comments as soon as I get back. And your comments about Ted Simon -- Ted has spent several nights at our house. A better houseguest would be hard to find. I've kept in touch w/Ted ever since I first met him, back in the late '90's. A "Ted" anecdote -- just before Ted left on his second trip around the world, the telephone rang. My wife answered. The voice on the other end said, "I'll be coming through Birmingham, and I wonder if you have room for me." My wife answered, "Sure! When should we expect you?" "Next Tuesday, about 3pm" "Great! By the way, who is this?" "Oh, it's Ted Simon!" "Great, see you Tuesday". She never missed a beat, even though she didn't have a clue who she was talking to.

    (And yes, she "lets" me take one or two extended trips each year. Did I mention that I have the best wife in the world?)
    I'll have to fix the numbering..

    I'd really suggest trying Facebook when traveling. You end up having friends in areas you may be passing through making suggestions (some good, some not) of places to stay, things to see, where to eat - and sometimes inviting you to overnight with them. I got to meet people I'd only chatted with on FB or here, when they knew I was passing through their area.

    I usually tried to catch up with FB each evening - I spent 30 days on the road this spring, and 10 days last week (circled Lake Ontario, just'cause..) and never put the TV on in the motels. I'd spend the evening eating - usually around 7PM or so, then looking at Google Maps to decide what direction/road to start out on in the morning, and finally responding to and updating FB. After that and a call to home - I was ready for bed. Once every 5 days or so - I'd squeeze laundry in there somewhere (and do FB while waiting for the laundry to finish.)

    I found I have very little need for paper maps - if I looked at Google Maps the night before and had some idea what direction to start out on. Then I'll watch the compass display on my GPS - and make sure I'm heading in that direction.

    I might have to challenge you on the best wife claim.. I've never heard a complaint about my trips, and have often gotten encouragement in the gifting of travel books and guides for far away places.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  12. #12
    Jeff Wilson life member Jeffsride's Avatar
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    Long trips and vacations were my thing in the 80's and 90's. I did one major trip a year and many rallies. I am in Toronto and I would ride to rallies on a regular basis 1000-1200 km away on a Friday all back roads get to a rally Friday night and on Sunday it was the reverse all back roads but it was different, it was lonely. I was going home to my condo but it felt empty.

    Today (2017) I ride with groups I have found on meetup.com and ride about 500km on a Saturday or maybe a 400km ride on Sunday. I find this very satisfying for my needs.

    During the past 5 years I have gone to half a dozen rallies but they have changed (slowed down) and found them not to be my thing anymore.
    Jeff
    A bad day on the C650 GT scooter is better than the best day at work

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post

    I might have to challenge you on the best wife claim.. I've never heard a complaint about my trips, and have often gotten encouragement in the gifting of travel books and guides for far away places.
    I will challenge you all on that "best wife" issue. Voni lets me come riding with her - all summer!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  14. #14
    Rocky Bow BMW Riders #197 bogthebasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I will challenge you all on that "best wife" issue. Voni lets me come riding with her - all summer!
    Pretty hard to beat that - you are a lucky man indeed.
    Ken Dittrick
    2008 R1200RT (Biarritz Blau)

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  15. #15
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    You can satisfy the hunger to tour? Who knew? How do you do it?

    My season is almost over and I was light this year with miles, about 1/2 what I want, just 10K miles.

    Even at the best, when my season is over I plan the next season and I'm planning on next year already.

    Thing of it is, South, West, East, North or a combination and then there is that damn issue of Redheads. Oh, and Beer.

    If I go south, I can't have good Beer unless it's Rolling Rock and if I leave for longer than a few days, the many, too many Redheads have the need for the 'yoda loving. See the problem?

    Tell me how to satisfy the hunger for road trips. The Redheads will thank you and your Rolling Rock inventory won't get hit, too hard.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case, my baby, fast, fun)
    3xR90/6, two just sold, one for a sidecar. 1983 K100RS (Cafe now)
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