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Thread: Telelever vs Telescopic Front Suspension

  1. #16
    Roger L--that was a good link. Lots to consider about Telelever vs upside down forks.

  2. #17
    Registered User zenwhipper's Avatar
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    I've noticed no differences good or bad between my '15 RT (telelever) and my prior telescopic forks.
    “I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.”- Mark Twain
    Past bikes: 2001 Kawa ZR750S, 2002 VFR, 2006 V-Strom, 2008 FJR

  3. #18
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    I found this article on Cycle World's website. It implies that the reduced "stiction" of non-telescopic forks such as girder and Hossack (Telelever) have better braking response since the front tire can follow road irregularities better:

    https://www.cycleworld.com/honda-pat...ont-suspension
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  4. #19
    Registered User CABNFVR's Avatar
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    Once we had a Ducati and a K1200RS at the same time. Both were great bikes, but vastly different. A friend asked me how the Ducati handled. This was my response.

    If you are riding hard and hit a pebble mid turn the Ducati will tell you, "You just ran over a 7 sided rock measuring 3/8" x 3/4". You hit the second largest side. The pebble was thrown to the right and was not impacted by the rear tire. No other pebbles were impacted in this turn."

    The RS went through a similar turn at similar speed and hit a similar small rock. The RS said, "What rock?"
    "Have BMW. Will Travel"

  5. #20
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anyname View Post
    I found this article on Cycle World's website. It implies that the reduced "stiction" of non-telescopic forks such as girder and Hossack (Telelever) have better braking response since the front tire can follow road irregularities better:

    https://www.cycleworld.com/honda-pat...ont-suspension
    In addition to stiction problems, telescopic fork travel used by brake dive is travel not available to handle road irregularities, which is the primary purpose of the suspension.

    Programming telescopic ESA to increase compression damping can reduce (actually, slow down) dive, but this also makes the ride harsh.

    In contrast, a Telelever style fork controls brake dive through simple geometry. There is a little bit of dive engineered into it just so it "feels" like it is braking, but it could have been designed to stay completely level, or even rise. Keeping the bike level also helps keep weight on the rear wheel to assist with braking.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    In addition to stiction problems, telescopic fork travel used by brake dive is travel not available to handle road irregularities, which is the primary purpose of the suspension.

    Programming telescopic ESA to increase compression damping can reduce (actually, slow down) dive, but this also makes the ride harsh.

    In contrast, a Telelever style fork controls brake dive through simple geometry. There is a little bit of dive engineered into it just so it "feels" like it is braking, but it could have been designed to stay completely level, or even rise. Keeping the bike level also helps keep weight on the rear wheel to assist with braking.
    In fact, during testing of the initial design there was felt to be insufficient dive so they altered the geometry to deliberately allow some dive.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    ... Keeping the bike level also helps keep weight on the rear wheel to assist with braking.
    With a few exceptions, most of the braking force on a motorcycle is on the front wheel.

    For the OP...why not take a test ride? Most BMW dealers encourage test or demo rides on their bikes. Decide for yourself what you like for the feel, or don't like.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  8. #23
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    pro tele

    I'm in agreement w/pro telelever folks I haven't done a back to back ,but . I really enjoy going up a bituminous MX section &afterward hearing the comments of the telescopic fork folks . I've bikes w/telescopic forks & can appreciate the differences.That said you'll have to pry my tele-lever,you know the rest !

  9. #24
    Left Coast Rider
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    I have bikes with all three currently-available forks on them - telelever, duolever, and telescopic.

    Of the three the telescopic works best for me. Next is the duolever, and then the telelever. Those are MY preferences for a variety of reasons - road feel being the primary reason. YMMV

  10. #25
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    My opinion only.

    All of us are human, and the day may come when you overcook a turn and have to do something to slow down. Even worse, something else may make you have to do something to slow down mid-corner.

    A telelever bike has less dive, so you can straighten up, brake aggressively, and then lean it over and loose less ground clearance on the transitions. I feel more comfortable with less dive. Race and sport bikes can take advantage of the change in suspension geometry from dive to corner better. The assumption is you will never have unplanned occurrences making you have to change speeds or lines, or even if you do, the slightly faster lap time is all that matters. That is NEVER a concern in my street riding, not crashing is. I do not understand how dive is an advantage to not crashing.

    I will admit, it probably took me at least 20K smiles to become comfortable with the telelever feel, I hated it at first. I am a believer now. YMMV

    Rod

  11. #26
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    Hmm...it took you 20,000 miles to get used to the feeling of the telelever suspension...and you hated it till then? Yet this is good? A positive???

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  12. #27
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    Change is both a curse and a blessing.

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