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Thread: Motorcycle camping food choices

  1. #16
    Fastman Fastman's Avatar
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    I love my fresh brewed coffee in the mornings and bought an Aeropress coffee maker that I use daily in the house and on the road ... think inverted French press. I also found a hand grinder that perfectly slips inside the Aeropress. I carry lots of beans and grind just what I need for a cup. I use an MSR dragonfly stove ~15 years ago and itís still going strong. Itís a bit noisy, but I like that I can control the flame from simmer to full blow torch.

    Iíve done the dehydrated meals and still carry 1 or 2 with me, but prefer to shop for a rib-eye and veggies for dinner. Breakfast is sometimes ground sausage, eggs and shredded cheese cooked together in a non-stick skillet.


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    Fastman
    '86 R65, '96 R1100RS, '04 K1200RS, '13 K1300S 30th Anniversary - SOLD
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  2. #17
    BMW Motorcycle Owners rdalland's Avatar
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    I prefer freshly prepared food, but always have a freeze dried meal along just in case. I like the Jetboil system...



    ...paired with a good cooler.



    No fuel worries with this canister.

    ride what you've got; enjoy the ride!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - BMWMOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  3. #18
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    I've been using the same little "Ebay" stove that Daboo pictured above. So far, one fuel canister has lasted through about ten days of camping, used for morning and evening meals and coffee. It still feels/sounds like it is about 1/3 full? I suppose I should buy a second one just to compare new vs empty weight. They are pretty easy to find at any store that carries camping gear. If you are traveling in areas sufficiently civilized to get to a grocery store every couple of days, you will not have any trouble finding a new canister.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  4. #19
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Isobutane/propane canisters are available almost anywhereóWalmart, sporting goods stores, hardware stores and so on, and a lot of campground stores handle them as well. Easy enough to pick up a spare as youíre riding by. And pick up a collapsible or folding wind shield even if the stove you select has one built in, as even with a built-in shield wind will dramatically reduce efficiency of the stove. And stability of your chosen stove is key, for both safety and functionality.

    I used to use white gas or multi-fuel stoves, but white gas is a PITA to find on the road and itís not always easy to extract gasoline from a fuel-injected bike. And the achilles heel of those stoves is the generator tube, which even with twice-yearly doses of carb cleaner mixed in with the fuel can get gummed up and inefficient.

    For camping rides I carry a Jetboil, an Aeropress, a small non-stick skillet, a small stainless steel pot (about a quart), a thrift-store melamine plate, a few utensils and condiment containers. Thatís enough gear to make a meal out of whatever Iíve packed or picked up along the way. Everything but the plate goes into a small stuff sack.

    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST -- 1988 R100GS "Bee"-- 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C -- 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  5. #20
    Fortes fortuna iuvat
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    Quote Originally Posted by richardus View Post

    Several posters have referred to the jetboil system. So I looked at those on Amazon as well. Looks like a cool little cooker, but I still
    have some concerns. When I went out east on my 8 day trip to Gaspe I took a simple bunsen burner on a small propane tank system,
    and found it not very practical. It takes forever to heat up stuff with it and literally an hour to boil water, because of too much air getting
    under the pot, even when it's not windy. Plus the propane takes up room and is probably a nasty fire hazard storing that in the bike.
    The jet boils seem more efficient that way, with wind guards and a closed pot to contain the heat, but it looks like you need to purchase
    special fuel for them, and what happens when that fuel runs out and there isn't anywhere around that sells them? When you go to remote
    areas it's hard to keep supplied on this specialty stuff. Either that or deliberately overstock on those fuel cells, which takes up valuable room.
    Name:  71sQ+9er1IL._SL1500_.jpg
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    !
    Further to my last post the jet boil that I've used for about the last 10 years is the same as in your photo. The flame is adjustable and the fuel cartridge stores inside the unit. Fuel is propane-butane and can be found in most camping stores. It is a high quality compact unit and gets an A+ from me FWIW.

  6. #21
    RK Ryder
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    This group certainly puts me to shame with creativity when it comes to eating on the road. I carry a Jet Boil and use it for coffee and oatmeal. I also have fruit for breakfast. Other than that, I tend to eat the rest of the meals at restaurants.

    However, when arriving at a rally, I'll go to a local grocery store and buy fruit, eggs, bacon, yogurt and ice. I don't trust the stability of the Jet Boil with a frying pan, so I take along a small grill. As well, any food not being eaten, gets stored in my collapsible cooler. Having a small, one wheel trailer makes carrying this gear easy.


    Quote Originally Posted by jandhumphreyme View Post
    For coffee I use a cone drip filter holder over my coffee cup. The downside to this is my filter holder is molded plastic and inconvenient to pack, but makes a very nice cup of joe.
    I grind coffee beans at home, but when on the road, I grind enough for carrying on the trip. I'm not that much of a coffee purist.

    In a soft kid's lunch box, I pack my coffee mug, inside my beer mug (of course with no handles). The bag coffee sits inside the coffee mug. The Jet Boil lays beside the beer mug and the molded plastic and inconvenient filter used to go into another case. However in the last couple of years, I have been using a stainless steel, collapsible filter holder. It now sits under the Jet Boil and mugs. Not as sturdy as the plastic version, but when folded flat, much easier to pack. I got this at MEC in Canada. There must be something equivalent in the US camping outlets.
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    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
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  7. #22
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richardus View Post
    I see a lot of reference to dehydrated food, which sounds to me like a special buy unless you live near some good outfitter stores.
    Available at Walmart...
    My fleet: 2015 R1200GS, 2017 Toyota Prius Prime (plug-in hybrid)

  8. #23
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider View Post
    ... snip ...
    I used to use white gas or multi-fuel stoves, but white gas is a PITA to find on the road and itís not always easy to extract gasoline from a fuel-injected bike. And the achilles heel of those stoves is the generator tube, which even with twice-yearly doses of carb cleaner mixed in with the fuel can get gummed up and inefficient.
    ... snip ... DG
    Agreed. Most of my trips with the bike kit are extended weekends. If I need to refuel extracting gas was difficult but there is a workaround. When the quick connect fuel lines were a recall item on my R1150R I ended up with an extra set. I have a spare chunk of fuel line with proper end on it and keep it with my small tool kit under the seat. I connect it to the line to pump my tank out for storage or repair. Not my favorite option on the road but it is a way to fill a multi-fuel tank when I need to.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider View Post
    Isobutane/propane canisters are available almost anywhereóWalmart, sporting goods stores, hardware stores and so on, and a lot of campground stores handle them as well. Easy enough to pick up a spare as youíre riding by. And pick up a collapsible or folding wind shield even if the stove you select has one built in, as even with a built-in shield wind will dramatically reduce efficiency of the stove. And stability of your chosen stove is key, for both safety and functionality.

    I used to use white gas or multi-fuel stoves, but white gas is a PITA to find on the road and itís not always easy to extract gasoline from a fuel-injected bike. And the achilles heel of those stoves is the generator tube, which even with twice-yearly doses of carb cleaner mixed in with the fuel can get gummed up and inefficient.

    For camping rides I carry a Jetboil, an Aeropress, a small non-stick skillet, a small stainless steel pot (about a quart), a thrift-store melamine plate, a few utensils and condiment containers. Thatís enough gear to make a meal out of whatever Iíve packed or picked up along the way. Everything but the plate goes into a small stuff sack.

    Best,
    DG
    My wife and I could not find an Isobutane/propane cannister in Stanley, Idaho while exploring the area in Aug 2017- mecca of backpacking, mountain biking and rafting. We are going back to a MSR white gas stove. I'm putting a spigot off the Safari tank on my ktm 690. If on the GSA - will just carry two liter bottles of gas.








    ktm 690

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tincup View Post
    My wife and I could not find an Isobutane/propane cannister in Stanley, Idaho while exploring the area in Aug 2017- mecca of backpacking, mountain biking and rafting. We are going back to a MSR white gas stove. I'm putting a spigot off the Safari tank on my ktm 690. If on the GSA - will just carry two liter bottles of gas. ktm 690
    Per Bing facts on Stanley, Idaho
    Stanley is a town in Custer County, Idaho, United States. The population was 63 at the 2010 census; down from 100 in 2000.
    I'm surprised you couldn't fine a butane canister in a town of 63.

    There is nothing near Stanley, ID except mountains, forests and streams.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder
    John 14:6

  11. #26
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tincup View Post
    My wife and I could not find an Isobutane/propane cannister in Stanley, Idaho while exploring the area in Aug 2017- mecca of backpacking, mountain biking and rafting. We are going back to a MSR white gas stove. I'm putting a spigot off the Safari tank on my ktm 690. If on the GSA - will just carry two liter bottles of gas.
    Well, if youíre going to pack fuel it would seem just as easy to pack an extra canister for the Jetboil...
    Best,

    DG (whistling while wandering off...)
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST -- 1988 R100GS "Bee"-- 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C -- 2010 K1300GT
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  12. #27
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    I use the MSR Reactor stove. It is similar to the jet boil but was less expensive and it uses the more common larger size fuel canisters. I also have a campfire grill that I can utilize providing no fire bans are in place. I carry a small set of nesting pots in addition to the stoves pot. I have a Pelican case that is my entire camp cooking outfit and food stowage. The tough well sealed Pelican case serves double as being bear resistant (not officially rated as such, but I expect it would provide plenty of resistance to any bears efforts). I use a combination of dried foods like instant potatoes, minute rice, dehydrated veggies and backpacking meals as well as some canned goods like vegetables and meats. I mix my own bannock bread mix and make up a bit to cook at night saving half to have with my breakfast. Breakfast consists of porridge, coffee and juice from crystals. A few condiments supplement the flavours; peanut butter, honey, mustard, soy sauce and spices. About the only fresh food I will enjoy is fish freshly caught from the lake or stream by which I camped and occasionally some berries that happen to be in season. Shopping daily for fresh groceries does not work so well for me since I am usually well away from civilization. Lunch is just a few handfuls of trail mix and jerky usually. The other major need is clean water and for that I use a combination of chlorine tablets for general use and a Katadyn pump filter to refill my Camel Back bladder.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  13. #28
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcmxcivrs View Post
    I use the MSR Reactor stove. It is similar to the jet boil but was less expensive and it uses the more common larger size fuel canisters.
    My Jet Boil is usually attached to the larger size fuel canister. I have been carrying two of these for the last two years and the first one has yet to become empty. However, I tend to use mine just for breakfasts (coffee, oatmeal, eggs, bacon) and occasionally for an afternoon stop on the road for either coffee or tea.

    After this thread, I'm going to try to be more innovative with preparing suppers and then the larger canister will definitely have a shorter life.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Niagara Riders #298 & Knights of the Roundel #333

  14. #29
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcmxcivrs View Post
    I use the MSR Reactor stove. It is similar to the jet boil but was less expensive and it uses the more common larger size fuel canisters. I also have a campfire grill that I can utilize providing no fire bans are in place. I carry a small set of nesting pots in addition to the stoves pot. I have a Pelican case that is my entire camp cooking outfit and food stowage. The tough well sealed Pelican case serves double as being bear resistant (not officially rated as such, but I expect it would provide plenty of resistance to any bears efforts). I use a combination of dried foods like instant potatoes, minute rice, dehydrated veggies and backpacking meals as well as some canned goods like vegetables and meats. I mix my own bannock bread mix and make up a bit to cook at night saving half to have with my breakfast. Breakfast consists of porridge, coffee and juice from crystals. A few condiments supplement the flavours; peanut butter, honey, mustard, soy sauce and spices. About the only fresh food I will enjoy is fish freshly caught from the lake or stream by which I camped and occasionally some berries that happen to be in season. Shopping daily for fresh groceries does not work so well for me since I am usually well away from civilization. Lunch is just a few handfuls of trail mix and jerky usually. The other major need is clean water and for that I use a combination of chlorine tablets for general use and a Katadyn pump filter to refill my Camel Back bladder.
    That MSR Reactor is a fantastic stove. If I were buying a new stove, that is exactly what I would get. During an early spring Mt. Rainier climb a couple of years ago, one of my climbing buddies had one of those. We were melting snow for water (at around 11,000 feet) and his MSR Reactor melted the snow far more quickly than my other buddies Jet Boil...it wasn't even close.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by powwow View Post
    That MSR Reactor is a fantastic stove. If I were buying a new stove, that is exactly what I would get. During an early spring Mt. Rainier climb a couple of years ago, one of my climbing buddies had one of those. We were melting snow for water (at around 11,000 feet) and his MSR Reactor melted the snow far more quickly than my other buddies Jet Boil...it wasn't even close.
    Can it be turned down low for actual slow cooking? Boiling water fast is nice, but the ability to cook a pork chop slowly is more important to me.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

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