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Thread: Speed Bleeder

  1. #16
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    Funny... we knew that 12 posts ago.
    Well, at least now confirmed. It sure would be nice if they could update their website.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  2. #17
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojoman View Post
    I only bleed in the winter when it is too cold to ride.
    I got the correct information from the people at www.speedbleeder.com
    Make sure you get the stainless steel even though it is twice as much. They will never corrode.

    2017 R1200GSW

    Front……right SB8125L, left SB6100
    Rear…….SB1010S
    Thanks for supplying the part numbers

    I'll update the tag cloud

    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  3. #18
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    Ya but we knew it for a 2016 not a 2017. Now we know they are the same. Always pays to make sure before one makes the monetary commitment and orders.

  4. #19

    Smile Expensive and Worth it?

    Several comments on the BMWLT Forum saying or suggesting they wouldn't use them if they had it to do over again. The stainless steel bleeders are $15 each. If you add bags and tubes and dust covers, I would have over $100 plus shipping in two sets (6 total) for my two rides. INSTEAD I'm going with the recommendation of several on the LT Forum, to just order and use the tubes/bags with the factory valves, and the key is to keep the bag higher than the caliper, so air can't go down through the expelled fluid. Sounds plausible to me, and way less expensive.
    TGR

  5. #20
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    I installed the steel ones on my 15RT a year ago, no corrosion issue what so ever
    It now takes all of 15 minutes to completely flush both the front brakes and the rear one, if I remember the cost was about $60 including the bag, to do over wouldn’t waste the money on the bag, length of plastic tubing and a12oz water bottle works just as well

  6. #21
    Knight-Errant 1957mpd's Avatar
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    Thanks Guys

    'Cuz of this thread I ordered a stainless set for the new GSA. Won't need a flush for two years, but when it does, I'm ready!

    Mark
    "Soló el que ensaya lo absurdo es capaz de conquistar lo imposible." Miguel de Unamuno 1905

    Mark - Las Cruces, NM - '10 K1300S and '17 R1200 GSA

  7. #22
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    I have he steel ones for 3 years, no problem and I've had them on other bikes too. At $7.00 each money well spent. I also like the bleeder bag, if you have ever kicked, knock or just pulled the hose a little to much you'd understand.

    Jay

  8. #23
    I've had speed bleeders, but I prefer vacuum bleeding. I can position myself at the brake reservoir and refill fluid as it flows into the vacuum canister. When I am happy with the amount purged, I close the nipple and turn off the pump. I use the larger canister pneumatic air - brake fluid - oil extractor because the little collectors tied inline to the manual pumps are a PITA to keep upright and sealed. I have found the device useful for a variety of other shop procedures including fluid clean-ups. The pneumatic (air-powered) pump can also be used to suck the old brake fluid out of the reservoir before you start purging. That way you have less old fluid to flush through the system and you don't need a syringe to empty it.

    vac pump.jpg

    Past that, even using the old "pump the brake" methodology, the brake levers and the bleed fittings are usually within one person's reach.
    Lee A. Dickinson - Danielsville, GA USA
    Airheads #3480 | Iron Butt Assn. #8914
    1976 R75/6 - 1992 R100RS - 1993 K1100RS - 2013 R1200GS

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