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Thread: Giant Equifax data breach- 143 million people could be affected

  1. #16
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 71243 View Post

    I talked to my bank & credit card company. They said that they are aware , and basically no need to worry . The C/C company added an additional security code while we spoke.

    I'll call investments tomorrow......Not much else we can do?...
    There is much more you can, and should, do. Start by contacting all your financial services, including banks, CC cards, investments, pension services, SSA, etc. and set up 2-factor authentication for any accounts you hold. If someone uses your leaked info to get into an account via social engineering you'll get a code popping up on your phone. Freeze your credit at all three of the credit services. Sign up for TransUnion's free monitoring service, NOT Equifax's service; they dropped the ball initially then sat on the breach until their C-level folks could offload their shares, do you really want to trust them for monitoring?

    This breach contains the golden eggs of identity theft information on everyone whose info was compromised, and the threat from this breach will carry on for decades. Citizens whose data was compromised will have to deal with the hassles of increased security on everything they do financially for the rest of their lives. There is no excuse for a breach such as this, whether it arises from technical incompetence or lack of employee training/monitoring/oversight and Equifax deserves every lawsuit and judgement against them.

    Don't wait until you see the camel's nose in the tent via weird charges showing up on your CC, or new cards or accounts appearing on your free credit reports that you should be requesting and saving now, as a baseline, and every four months in a rotation between the three credit bureaus. Don't wait for that new iPhone shipment or billing notice or the note from the appraisal service on your new mortgage or HELOC loan, be proactive.
    https://www.annualcreditreport.com/index.action

    Best,
    DG
    Last edited by GTRider; 09-12-2017 at 12:22 PM. Reason: Typo
    DGerber
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  2. #17
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    My local news provided a website that you can use to check if you're vulnerable. It's an https secure site and you have to enter the last 6 of your SSN.

    https://equifaxsecurity2017.com

    Click on the potential impact link.
    I did that and happily it informed me that I am not involved in this data breach.

    I also have used credit monitoring through Experian, and have used it for several years. The last two times I applied for vehicle loans, I was notified that an application for a loan in my name had been detected. My experience is that credit monitoring is a good service to have.

    Harry
    My fleet: 2015 R1200GS, 2017 Toyota Prius Prime (plug-in hybrid)

  3. #18
    Actually, being allowed to collect this information is criminal, and doing it ought to be a felony. And losing it ought to bear absolute liability with no defense. Maybe $100,000 per person might compensate for inconvenience and any loss ought to be paid for double. Then they might not collect it and certainly might protect it. If affected I will enthusiastically join a class action lawsuit. I have no business relationship with these clowns. They compiled my information without my permission.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  4. #19
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Actually, being allowed to collect this information is criminal, and doing it ought to be a felony. And losing it ought to bear absolute liability with no defense. Maybe $100,000 per person might compensate for inconvenience and any loss ought to be paid for double. Then they might not collect it and certainly might protect it. If affected I will enthusiastically join a class action lawsuit. I have no business relationship with these clowns. They compiled my information without my permission.
    You can also blame the regulators.
    By accepting a credit card, loan, mortgage or other credit instruments- a borrower or card 💳 holder accepts the terms or cannot participate.
    It's unfortunately way too late.
    From Discover-
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  5. #20
    I used the link Kurt provided...Thank you Kurt...and found that I was also not involved.
    That said ....can we even trust that? It is after all the same company. I still made many phone calls & will for sure keep an even closer eye on all my statements.

    I agree with Paul...IMO it is criminal activity and these execs should be prosecuted along with the company itself.

    30-40 days before reporting, then bailing themselves out !...No excuse.
    Ron Prior {AMA member ,MOA member}
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  6. #21
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    It may serve a a good reminder to those who may use credit. I actually don't know anyone (else) that reads those "warnings" such as I posted.......They all have 'em.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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  7. #22
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    It may serve a a good reminder to those who may use credit. I actually don't know anyone (else) that reads those "warnings" such as I posted.......They all have 'em.
    OM
    And all those card agencies and the banks behind them ignored all that accumulated data anyway by giving totally unverified loans to anyone with a heartbeat in the build-up to the crash of 2008-2009. And, they are playing the sub-prime loan game again only this time with vehicle loans, so be ready for that as it is coming down the pipeline just as surely as it did with housing in 2008.

    Gee, do ya think Harvey and Irma destroyed any financed vehicles? Have a wild guess how many of them are not covered for flood insurance (check your own policy...) and will go into default? Hhmmm.....

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...ts-are-soaring

    Best,
    DG
    DGerber
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  8. #23
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Yeah, I didn't think I had done business with them and I suppose I could wait until/if I get a letter in the mail. But I don't think there's much harm...knock wood!
    You don't do business directly with Equifax. They collect information (you have no choice in this) and provide it to anyone you get a credit card or a loan from. They also sell your information to all of the clowns who send you pre-approved credit applications. Those are really swell since all someone needs to do is grab one and fill it in to steal your identity.

    The prudent thing to do is to go to each of the credit agencies and get them to lock down your credit so that no one (including you) can get credit in your name. You will be asked to have passwords so that you can release credit information when you wish.

    I found all this out when researching "Life Lock". I found that their service was essentially useless, but that the locking of your credit is effective and, depending on your state, may even be free. At most it will cost $10 or $15 per agency.
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  9. #24
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Interesting.....I was wondering if anyone had experience with LifeLock
    OM
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  10. #25
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Someone Made a Fake Equifax Site. Then Equifax Linked to It.


    From the New York Times-

    People create fake versions of big companies’ websites all the time, usually for phishing purposes. But the companies do not usually link to them by mistake.

    Equifax, however, did just that after Nick Sweeting, a software engineer, created an imitation of equifaxsecurity2017.com, Equifax’s page about the security breach that may have exposed 143 million Americans’ personal information. Several posts from the company’s Twitter account directed consumers to Mr. Sweeting’s version, securityequifax2017.com. They were deleted after the mistake was publicized.



    More here- https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/20/b...e-website.html

    A bunch of lazy, unregulated, seemingly unpublishable, clowns.

    OM
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  11. #26
    Registered User powwow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    Someone Made a Fake Equifax Site. Then Equifax Linked to It.


    From the New York Times-

    People create fake versions of big companies’ websites all the time, usually for phishing purposes. But the companies do not usually link to them by mistake.

    Equifax, however, did just that after Nick Sweeting, a software engineer, created an imitation of equifaxsecurity2017.com, Equifax’s page about the security breach that may have exposed 143 million Americans’ personal information. Several posts from the company’s Twitter account directed consumers to Mr. Sweeting’s version, securityequifax2017.com. They were deleted after the mistake was publicized.



    More here- https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/20/b...e-website.html

    A bunch of lazy, unregulated, seemingly unpublishable, clowns.

    OM
    So true...Equifax, what a bunch of sleezy business people. When I did my credit freeze with Equifax, the first thing they do is try to get you to sign up for the credit monitoring service at $4.99 for the first month and $24.99 per month after that. WTF...they lose my information, then try to get me to pay for them to protect it.

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by powwow View Post
    So true...Equifax, what a bunch of sleezy business people. When I did my credit freeze with Equifax, the first thing they do is try to get you to sign up for the credit monitoring service at $4.99 for the first month and $24.99 per month after that. WTF...they lose my information, then try to get me to pay for them to protect it.
    The lawsuits will soon bankrupt these crooks. Their operation ought to be illegal but ... (the rest is not approved for this forum).
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  13. #28
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    I put a freeze on my credit. That closes that opportunity for theft.

    chris
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  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    I put a freeze on my credit. That closes that opportunity for theft.

    chris
    Not exactly. They still might raid an existing bank account. They might file for a tax refund using your identity. They might ... and on and on. A freeze on new credit helps but fails to solve the problem.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  15. #30
    Registered User tanker4me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Not exactly. They still might raid an existing bank account. They might file for a tax refund using your identity. They might ... and on and on. A freeze on new credit helps but fails to solve the problem.
    Paul is correct.

    I am not an expert, but I have experienced ID theft.

    Accounts were created before the freeze was initiated that remained active unbeknownst to me till the collection notices started showing up. 18-24 months later!

    4 years into it, I received calls from 2 reputable banks asking if I had applied for credit. TransUnion was called. (the only credit bureau that had someone answer the phone)

    I was told that 3 other banks besides the 2 that called me had made credit inquiries.

    I called all 3.

    The first had a recording stating they were in receivership !

    The second stated they refused credit.

    The third bank called said that a new credit card was approved, and in the process of being issued !!! I informed the person on the phone that there was a freeze on my credit, & that I was only calling because 2 other banks had followed protocol and called me to confirm wether or not I applied for credit, & that TransUnion informed me that your bank had inquired as well. When I asked why I wasn't called for conformation, I was simply told that the card would be cancelled.

    7 years into it got a call from a Police Department stating they arrested a person that was using 400+ identities.

    Limit your exposure.

    DG is correct as well.

    At the very least.

    Get a free credit report yearly.

    If you have anything of importance that requires a password(s), change them every 90-180 days.
    Last edited by tanker4me; 09-23-2017 at 02:18 AM.
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