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Thread: 1970 R75/5 #2970531 Restoration

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmo1131 View Post
    You stated the bike is a "70", but do my eyes deceive me... . but is that a Long Wheel Base swing arm? On a '70 it should not be. But an LWB swing arm would be in keeping with the grab rail. I'm curious, what's the underside of the seat pan look like?
    Hi Lew, It looks like SWB swing arm to me.
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  2. #17

    You can also tell by looking at the rear shocks

    A short wheel base bike has the upper shock mounts right up to the down section of the rear sub frame and the shock will sit pretty much at a 90 degree angle. If it had a SWB sub frame but a LWB swing arm the angle of the shock is noticeable.

    I do believe the toaster tank is a curry toaster tank repainted white, I have one out in the shop along with a set of curry fenders. I have a '73 LWB with 9,000 on the clock that was rescued from under a house, I got it with no fenders or tank but everything else completely intact and the motor spins free with compression. I just started messing with it but can't decide on a restoration, clean up and running or just get it running and move it along.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69zeff65 View Post
    I have a '73 LWB with 9,000 on the clock that was rescued from under a house, I got it with no fenders or tank but everything else completely intact and the motor spins free with compression. I just started messing with it but can't decide on a restoration, clean up and running or just get it running and move it along.
    Very cool! Those are hard decisions but really a 'good problem' to have. Post some pics, would love to see it. Whatever you choose its got a great story ... 'Under-a-house find' hehe.

  4. #19
    Airmarshal-IL James.A's Avatar
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    My recommendation would be to get a baseline servicing completed, get it running and enjoy. I own an un-restored, original 1973 R75/5 for my daily rider. These /5's are wonderful motorbikes when you learn to handle and adapt to some of the primitive limitations. I see your bike has the original silver-turned-to-gold intake tubes, a fine and rare detail. If it has the 64/32/9&10 Bing carburetors, you have a well sorted machine on your hands. It's a thing of beauty. I am sure Lew would agree.

    Ah,...I see it has the 2 screw dome topped Bing carbs. You will have no trouble with them, but not original in the purist sense. I recently bought a 1971 R75/5 with those carbs. They can be made to run just fine on your 750. If the bike has had regular service, they are almost certainly well sorted.
    1973 R75/5

  5. #20

    Interesting and it made me think a little.

    Quote Originally Posted by tko11 View Post
    Very cool! Those are hard decisions but really a 'good problem' to have. Post some pics, would love to see it. Whatever you choose its got a great story ... 'Under-a-house find' hehe.
    The suggestion that I post a couple pictures of the R 75/5 in its current state made me think a little about the bike pictures I like to see posted. Its nice to see super clean original bikes, restored ones, the different colors, and of course the enjoyed bike that shows its history of enjoyment and service.

    One of my favorite posts here has been Brooke Reams and his documentation of his projects, I cannot even come close to duplicating his educational value.

    I really like the "barn find" and "rescue" pictures and short stories about the find and rescue efforts. I'll make some time this weekend to get a few snap shots of it and post them.

    Interesting, I found an answer to a question I didn't know had been bugging me for a while.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by James.A View Post
    My recommendation would be to get a baseline servicing completed, get it running and enjoy. I own an un-restored, original 1973 R75/5 for my daily rider. These /5's are wonderful motorbikes when you learn to handle and adapt to some of the primitive limitations. I see your bike has the original silver-turned-to-gold intake tubes, a fine and rare detail. If it has the 64/32/9&10 Bing carburetors, you have a well sorted machine on your hands. It's a thing of beauty. I am sure Lew would agree.

    Ah,...I see it has the 2 screw dome topped Bing carbs. You will have no trouble with them, but not original in the purist sense. I recently bought a 1971 R75/5 with those carbs. They can be made to run just fine on your 750. If the bike has had regular service, they are almost certainly well sorted.
    Hi James, thanks for the post. I didn't realize the original silver turned-to-gold intake tubes were a desirable thing .... I learned something already. So do you think my carbs are not original to the bike? I must say you are all having an influence on my approach to this machine. Thinking .....

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69zeff65 View Post
    The suggestion that I post a couple pictures of the R 75/5 in its current state made me think a little about the bike pictures I like to see posted. Its nice to see super clean original bikes, restored ones, the different colors, and of course the enjoyed bike that shows its history of enjoyment and service.

    One of my favorite posts here has been Brooke Reams and his documentation of his projects, I cannot even come close to duplicating his educational value.

    I really like the "barn find" and "rescue" pictures and short stories about the find and rescue efforts. I'll make some time this weekend to get a few snap shots of it and post them.

    Interesting, I found an answer to a question I didn't know had been bugging me for a while.

    Great .... looking forward to your post!!!

  8. #23
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    A few questions

    Does anyone know if the rubber surrounding the tool tray is available somewhere? And the seat hinges .... is the original finish cad plated?
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  9. #24
    Registered User jagarra's Avatar
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    Available from dealer 02 52 53 1 230 398 GASKET $15.00
    1994 R1100RS-(5/93)-,1974 R90/6 built 9/73,--1964 Triumph T100--1986 Concours

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tko11 View Post
    So do you think my carbs are not original to the bike?
    According to the Bing book, the carbs look like Type 64-3 which James pointed out has two screws to hold the dome onto the carb body. The original would have been Type 64 with four screws. The carb numbers would give it away. James said 64/32/9 or /10 would in the right range...could also be /1-/2 or /3-/4. If it's much bigger, then the carbs are for another model. Not to say they won't work provide the internals are set up to resemble /5 carb settings.
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  11. #26
    FWIW I have 2970304 I think. A few hundred earlier, made in November '69.

    My future brother in law and I were going to buy this bike together to fix and flip, back in '04, and I decided I wanted to keep it so I bought it. It was running on one cylinder, and the owner said he rode with his daughter up and down the street every now and then. I think he never knew how it felt with both cylinders firing, because by the look of the LH carb it had been a LONG time since it had atomized fuel. The transmission was stuck in one gear, the seat was trash, and I'm sure the tires were also. No pinstripes on the tank, so I guess it was a repaint.

    I fixed the trans, overhauled the carbs, did whatever else I needed to do and it was a very nice runner. 2.91 final, extra heavy flywheel and a few other details give it away as a very early bike. It now has a 5-speed and I'd like to swap in a later clutch and starter, but it's just not a priority.

    Years later, some guys were doing some utility work at the bottom of our yard and I was talking to them about the motorcycles they saw around. Yeah, their buddy had a BMW that he might want to sell. What's his name? Oh, he doesn't have that bike any more, it's up in my garage.

    It's a super pleasant bike to ride at around 70~75 MPH. Glassy smooth. And it cleans up very nicely. I don't want to restore it further.

    OK, hijack off. I just have a weakness for these.

    Anton Largiader 72724
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  12. #27
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    Super nice Anton. Thanks for sharing!

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagarra View Post
    Available from dealer 02 52 53 1 230 398 GASKET $15.00
    Many thanks!

  14. #29
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    Here's what I found on the carbs.
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  15. #30
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    BMW could easily have folded on motorcycle development and production back in the late 1960's. My hats off to that small group of engineers and design team that did the fine work to to bring the /5 into being. We have the bikes we now have due to their diligence to keep it going. Thx much Guys.

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