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Thread: Garmin Basecamp / GPS / Google Maps

  1. #16
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    Thanks for the suggestions. That's what forums are all about...helping each other.

    I'm finding a block in making this work. It's a personal thing, I think. By the time I can zoom in to see the detail maps...I can't see anything more than my own neighborhood. Ugh.

    So I set up a test scenario from my home to the Duval library. Hmmm...it took me on a less twisty road than if I just let my 590LM handle it. It also took me into a road that is often stop-n-go, rather than moving traffic.

    I'll look into this more...but I'm thinking there are better alternatives.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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  2. #17
    IBA# 5819 61996's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daboo View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. That's what forums are all about...helping each other.

    I'm finding a block in making this work. It's a personal thing, I think. By the time I can zoom in to see the detail maps...I can't see anything more than my own neighborhood. Ugh.

    So I set up a test scenario from my home to the Duval library. Hmmm...it took me on a less twisty road than if I just let my 590LM handle it. It also took me into a road that is often stop-n-go, rather than moving traffic.

    I'll look into this more...but I'm thinking there are better alternatives.

    Chris
    Ah...OK. No biggie.
    Once BC is open and you have your route displayed, in the bottom left pane, double click on the route. That will open another dialog box.
    Across the top of that new box, click on "Route options". From there you can set up profiles for how you would like BC to calculate your route.
    Theres quite a number of different scenarios.

    Part 2) Once BC is open and your route is displayed, go to that left pane again and this time right click on the route and select "show on map".
    That should zoom you out to see a snapshot of the entire route.
    Generally, pressing the letter Z on your keyboard, you should be able to zoom in and out by using either the right or left mouse buttons.

    Hope this helps.

    Joe
    “Fate whispers to the warrior, 'You can not withstand the storm.'
    The warrior whispers back, 'I am the storm.'

  3. #18
    At the moment I really hate basecamp and I'm trying to love it so much...
    My problem with it is that (I live in UK) the UK maps installed on the device show up in the map options, but the US maps (which I purchased from garmin) are loaded on the SD card.
    Unless the Nav V is plugged into the pc I can't use the US maps for planning (well I can but it just draws straight lines between points), which is a pain to say the least.
    All I'd like it to do is acknowledge that I've got the US maps so I can use its functionality.
    Any suggestions (part from chucking it...which I have been close to) how to get the basecamp to have the US map in the options drop down would be gratefully received.

    Derek
    Derek, current bike R1200RT LE (2017)
    Previous bikes, Honda Pan European, Kawasaki GT 750, Kawasaki GPZ 550, a bunch of kids and a Gilera 125

  4. #19
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Just like on your GPS, in Basecamp you have to tell it to display higher detail on the maps. I think the default is quite low so this may be why you are not seeing much of the roads displayed.

    I've come to learn how to work with Basecamp enough to get done what I need to do, but I'm far from enjoying it. I really dislike the way it organizes and saves the data. To be able to have a route or track as an individual file, one must export it first which seems ridiculous. Plus it will always clutter the screen with every single track and route that is in a file list. You have to keep creating new "lists" to separate the individual files. Trying to save a list on a remote cloud to access and modify on different computers is a whole new level of crazy.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2019 F850GSA

  5. #20
    Registered User mylanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 61996 View Post
    . . .here is another excellent resource:http://www.newenglandriders.org/Learn_BaseCamp_PC.pdf
    Trust me when I say that once you get the hang of it you'll find its a very powerful program and you'll not go back. The key is once you learn the basics, just keep using it and it will all fall into place. I use it exclusively.

    But in answer to your original question, here is a link to a program that many use to convert to .gpx: http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/

    Good luck!
    +1

    BUT, beware of using Google Maps and converting. See thread: https://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread...ons&highlight= Garmin could not guarantee that it wasn't this conversion from Google that caused failure of the unit due to some type of software corruption. Has anyone else encountered this? Anyone have insight?
    2012 F650GS

  6. #21
    Kein Nasebohrer RBEmerson's Avatar
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    I agree that BC is an acquired taste. As software, it sux. It's complex in ways that inhibit its use. I wish I could remember who to credit for a break-through on understanding how BC handles waypoints internally. I'll take a stab at providing BC satori (Zen enlightenment): (hint: it's long and probably needs to be read a few times and tried on BC, but it will explain the machinery hidden inside BC, the stuff that does all the work. The UI with the draw-a-route, etc. tools isn't discussed here)

    All (and this is the big point) data is common in a collection(the topmost part of the data organization). That is, if a particular route is laid out with waypoints, those waypoints can be accessed by all existing routes and any routes to come. If a route is laid out from Pittsburgh, PA to Indianapolis, IN with waypoint Sandusky in OH (major props for anyone who can explain why "sooner or later, everybody has to go through Sandusky" - it's bike related). Later, a route is laid out from Columbus, OH to Cincinnati, OH, via Sandusky. An attempt to create the waypoint Sandusky fails - "Invalid Input". Why? Waypoint Sandusky already exists in the collection's route PGH-Indy. Copy Sandusky and paste it in the list of waypoints in Col-Cin, and that route can use the waypoint. Again, if a waypoint exists in one route, any route can use that waypoint. And here's where the program turns to near trash...

    The collection has a list of routes. Each route has its own unique waypoints - no name duplication (can't do that anyway), although common locations (the intersection of Market St and Broad St, for example) with different names are allowed. So far, so good.

    A route is being laid out, using parts of a set of roads used in a couple of existing route. But the user doesn't know which route has which waypoints. "I know waypoint Sandusky exists in a route. How do I find out which one?" There is no 'show me the route with Sandusky' command - there is no "list all waypoints and where they're used" command or menu item. (It doesn't help to know that BC, to function, must know the answer to the question. It just gives you the stinkeye and won't do it)

    There is one bit of hope. Click on the blue folder immediately under the word Library on the leftmost (route list) window. Every route in the collection is displayed on the map. With their waypoints. Move the map to the area where waypoint Sandusky is. Zoom in until the waypoint is easy to see. Put the cursor on the waypoint and right click. In the pop-up window, click Open. In the properties window (name of the waypoint in the upper left corner) is a tab marked References. Click on it and... OMG a list of which routes use Sandusky!

    Yes, the process is that indirect and annoying. BTW "Invalid Input" is about as misleading a warning as any warning ever seen. What it means is "This name exists - copy and use it, or pick a unique name".

    If you know about relational databases, BC should look familiar. For those who don't, BC will continue to be a PITA.

    There are any number of other gripes, flaws, and stupidities in BC. But...

    I'm going to spend a week in the Alps this summer. I was there last summer. I don't know all the secret roads, but I do know some passes I want to see. I've built a set of routes that tie them and some other places of interest together. For example, the trip from Munich, DEU to Mittenwald, DEU (Google and Maps are your friend here) is laid out with no slabbing and some stops along the way. Or Mittenwald to Andermatt, CH - that needs some slabbing (long trip, short day) and two passes (Sattelegg and Ibergeregg). Much as I'd like to do some "where's this road go?" riding, there just isn't space for that. BC lets me build a route by hand, adding waypoints to avoid autobahns, etc., and gives me a hint about time needed (pass speeds average about 30 MPH but BC is clueless about that) as well as the distance. And I can upload it to my Zumo 660.

    Executive summary: BC, overall, has a miserable user interface that makes an even worse work flow. Once the user understands that the collection is really a relational database, and that's applied to routes and waypoints, there is some hope of getting clever with BC. Regardless of how routes are built, they can be uploaded to the 660 and used as needed. The advantage over Maps/Waze is if cell phone connectivity is lost (riding in the hinterlands) the GPS still knows the way.

    - - - -
    For the die-hard who's still here...

    I created a list (I'm assuming you've figured out working with folders and lists) inside a folder called Alps Trip. The list is called Everything (really). All of the routes are built using this list. That means the list contains all of the waypoints used by all the routes.

    There's a route containing waypoint PGH, PA-OH Border, OH-IN Border, and Indy. Time to add Sandusky. Double click on the route on the map. A pop-up window shows a list of the waypoints in the route. At the very right, at about the middle of the right margin, are four icons: grey up-arrow, green +, grey down-arrow, and a clock - ignore the clock. Click once on the line with IN-OH Border. Click once on the green +. A pop-up with a list with all of the waypoints in Everything shows up. Type something like "Sand" and waypoint Sandusky is marked. Double click it and the waypoint is added to the route. If you want to change order of waypoints, click on a waypoint, and use the up and down arrows to re-position it. Close the window with the route's waypoints, and BC will recompute the route, using the new waypoint(s). (Why Stateside routes got into my Alps Routes folder is a mystery)

    Here's where Everything makes life easy. When I decide to create a new route, and find I'll go near Sattelegg, I ask for the waypoint for Sattelegg, and insert it in the route, just as I did with Sandusky. Here's where things get really interesting. I've got seven routes for the seven days I'll be riding. I've got a couple hundred waypoints (honest). I want to KISS and have only the route and its waypoints in list Day 1. Right click on Alps Routes folder (right now it only contains list Everything) and create a list called Day 1. Open up Everything and scroll down to the route Munich-Mittenwald. Click on it. Use CTL+C to put a copy in the clipboard. Go back to list Day 1 which, right now, is empty. Here comes the magic... Click in the empty list space and use CTL+V to paste Munich-Mittenwald into Day 1. Not only does route Munich-Mittenwald show up in list Day 1, but so do all of the waypoints it uses! Create Day 2, Day 3, etc. with each day's routing, and I have each route and all of its waypoints listed in one place. Better still, I look at waypoint Sattelegg and decide to call it Satteleggpass. I change the name seen in list Day 1. Not only does route Day 1 now use a waypoint called Satteleggpass, so does every other route in the collection. If there are three possible routes going over Sattelegg, the waypoint originally called Sattelegg is now called Satteleggpass in all three routes, even though it was changed in only one route, and it'll be changed in the list with all routes' waypoints: list Everything. Shazam!!
    Last edited by RBEmerson; 05-03-2017 at 04:38 AM. Reason: Editing, always editing
    Some people are wise. Some people are otherwise.

  7. #22
    Registered User Mark H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by britabroad View Post
    At the moment I really hate basecamp and I'm trying to love it so much...
    My problem with it is that (I live in UK) the UK maps installed on the device show up in the map options, but the US maps (which I purchased from garmin) are loaded on the SD card.
    Unless the Nav V is plugged into the pc I can't use the US maps for planning (well I can but it just draws straight lines between points), which is a pain to say the least.
    All I'd like it to do is acknowledge that I've got the US maps so I can use its functionality.
    Any suggestions (part from chucking it...which I have been close to) how to get the basecamp to have the US map in the options drop down would be gratefully received.

    Derek
    Derek,

    I had a similar problem. I purchased the Nav V and it came without any maps.
    So I went to the Garmin shop and purchased the AU and US maps and they come on separate Micro SD Cards. So either way, I needed to have the right card inserted into the Nav V and then the Nav V had to be connected to the laptop via the USB cable.

    I found that you can load the data from the SD card onto a USB thumb drive (memory stick) and now all I need to do is plug the USB stick into the laptop, start Basecamp and it automatically looks to the USB device (as if it is the NAV V).
    Because the data on this and the SD card are the same, when I've finished planning my trip, I stop using the USB thumb drive, plug the NAV V in (which has the correct SD card installed), and upload my routes. The route data and other information like waypoints etc. should be stored in Basecamp (on your computer) - not on the USB thumb drive.
    NOTE: This is not a way to copy the maps for use on other GPS devices. The map data for use in a GPS is locked to the unique code of the SD Card.

    Like a lot of people have said, BC is a challenging piece of software, but once you know how to use it, it is a great tool and has worked perfectly perfectly for me with the BMW Nav V.
    I use a combination of Google Maps (to start the investigation process with maps and street view), then I move to Basecamp, and then upload to the Nav V.

    I've often thought it may be worth creating a how to for this process. In a former life I was a software trainer and content developer, so I have a very clear appreciation for how software can be challenging to learn. Most people are overwhelmed by the enormity of what is presented and are quickly disheartened by a clunky application, particularly when the software is as unintuitive as Basecamp is.
    My approach is never to learn (or teach) any more about an application or process than the user needs to know. Certainly not initially, and then at some point down the track, if the student is willing, able and most importantly interested, you can delve deeper into an application or investigate alternate processes.

    In the case of Basecamp - the basics of planning a route with a start point, a finish point, any number of stops along the way and a selection of preferred roads to ride in between, is actually not a complex process. It is however not obvious and therefore it is easily forgotten if you don't do it often. That's why a simple "How To" cheat sheet is invaluable.
    Mark Hubble
    2015 - R1200GS Black Storm Metallic
    Sydney, AUSTRALIA

  8. #23

    Video tutorial

    If it helps I just put together this quick video tutorial on using basecamp...

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