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Thread: Riding around the Sequoias

  1. #1
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    Riding around the Sequoias

    I'm an East Coaster that wants to ride around the native areas of the Sequoias for 2-5 days +- in mid May.
    I'd welcome any advice on that area.
    Been keeping a Bike in the Pacific NW and gonna bring home for major servicing.

    Riding Two up and motels/hotels.
    I/we are flexible day to day according to the wind direction.
    Been keeping a Bike in the Pacific NW and gonna bring home for major servicing.

    Any advice (general to detailed) will be appreciated pertaining to the Sequoias areas:

    Nice roads
    Paved roads (with short excursions on dirt roads cause you may not see much if you don't).
    Lodging moderate to mid range
    Eateries/local foods
    Being around nice people

    Etc.

    I only remember a teeny bit from a 1975 trip on a '72 R60/5 with an Avon Fairing.
    Luckily I am still gawking on two wheels.

    Thanks,
    Charlie

  2. #2
    Hi Charlie,

    The Sequoia's cover a big area? It might help knowing where you are coming from and where you would like to end up? Are you mostly looking to ride the road to do your sight seeing or do you want to get off the bike and do some hiking?

    John

  3. #3
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    Generally coming from N or NW and heading toward S/SE (Utah and maybe Santa Fe to visit a friend ) but nothing definite. Just riding near and wanted to see nice forest since I know they are near where my general direction may be.
    We don't hike but can picnic and nap with the best of 'em in peaceful places. We also like small towns and places that have benches on "Main St" however small.
    Basically, we'll just be riding thru slowly and don't like answering the question "Did you go this way or to this place" with "No, I didn't know about that". It happens.
    I can stop more in a 200 mi day than anybody riding solo should be allowed too.

    Thanks John,

    Charlie

  4. #4
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    Starting from the Pacific NW is sort of general. But assuming you want to maximize time on fun roads and less on the superslab, I'd buzz down I-5 to Grants Pass, OR then take 199 to Crescent City, CA. Once you crest over into CA you'll start encountering the redwoods on some nice pavement. South on 101 will take you through, or close to, many redwood groves. One of the highly recommended roads down that way is Hwy 36 that intersects 101 just south of Fortuna and goes eastward to Red Bluff. I've not encountered 36 yet, but it's somewhat legendary out here.

    On your way towards Utah you could go up through Lassen, or try the Feather River Highway, both ultimately lead you through Reno...
    Bill Johnston

  5. #5
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    Last year I did some of those areas and need to look into your suggestions on the other roads. Even if I need to backtrack.

    Highlights last year were:

    A slow days ride up the Rogue River to Agness, OR to mail a Postcard.

    The small Redwood Grove, 5 mi. +- (on a easy dirt road in the dry), East of Cresent City. There I stayed in the Curly Redwood Lodge, a 50's era local motel that was built entirely from 1 tree. All 57,000 board feet.
    Basic, Friendly and Affordable.

    There was a good road, Rt 1, from Leggett, CA toward the Coast and South to Fort Bragg where a East direction took me again (last visit was 40+ yrs ago) to Chico and North to Lassen, that was closed due to snow, again. The thru road doesn't open till July, on average, maybe. Worth going as far as you can go on either end of the Park though.

    I had a very nice ride from Weed, Ca over to Callahan and Etna and up a nice Valley to Yreka, w/ Mt Shasta dominating the rear view mirror. Thanks to Butler maps for that one.
    That was also the first time I ever saw wildlife, deer, standing in a creek/river and drinking, as I look over every bridge I ever cross.

    All those places are very entertaining to country folk (me) from the East Coast where I'm from.

    Hence the desire to ride around or through the Sequoias.

    Keep 'em coming.
    Charlie
    Last edited by 72r60/7; 02-23-2017 at 01:14 PM. Reason: Clarifying sentence

  6. #6
    Charlie, Hwy-36 is a great motorcycle ride! Fortuna to Red Bluff. Or the other way around. Good places to stay in Fortuna. Don't miss the Eel River Brewing Co. for good food and of course beer.

    It is hard to say which way to go? I have done rides where I have followed most of the river roads from I-5 To Hwy-1/101 and back in both Oregon and California. (not at one time) I like them all. I don't care for the heat so I stay along the coast as much as possible or in the higher elevations. It is pretty country.

    Hwy-89 cuts across the Sierra from Mt. Shasta to Hwy-88. It takes you around part of Lake Tahoe. Pulls you away from the redwoods but you trade that in for some large conifers.

    Are you looking to drop south of Mendocino? South of San Francisco?

    John

  7. #7
    3 Red Bricks
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    You need to be clearer on what you are looking for.

    Coastal Redwoods (tallest trees in the world) are like the name implies, found along the northern coastal range of California.

    Giant Sequoias (most massive trees in the world) are found in several groves along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountains in eastern California mostly south of Yosemite, with the most significant grove being the Giant Forrest in Sequoia National Park, with five of the ten most massive trees in the world.

    So northwest Calif. for the tallest (Coastal Redwoods) and southeast Calif. for the most massive (Giant Sequoia) (up to 33 ft. diameter).




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  8. #8
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    If you want coastal redwoods, take 101 from the Oregon border south to Humbolt county. Get off at Avenue of the Giants (31 miles of old 101 that parallels the new 101). It takes you through the heart of some of the best old growth redwoods. Free Brochure/map available at north and south ends at side of road. http://avenueofthegiants.net/wp-cont...hureAndMap.pdf

    Take side trip on Mattole Rd. to Rockefeller Grove. Short .5 mile loop walk to Giant Tree.

    Stop at Founders Grove and take short walk (.6 mile loop) past Dyerville Giant 370' fallen redwood.

    There are a couple drive thru trees that for $6 you can get your picture in the tree.

    Great road!!! Stop in one of the small villages along the Avenue of the Giants for either you meal or pick up food for a picnic among the Giants.


    Last edited by 98lee; 02-24-2017 at 03:44 AM.
    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

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  9. #9
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    Should the title have read "Riding around the Sequoia TREES" or "Riding around where the Sequoia trees ARE" instead of "Riding around the Sequoias"

    Hence the desire to ride around or through the Sequoias.
    Sorry, I can't be more specific than that.

    several groves along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountains in eastern California mostly south of Yosemite,
    I have a Butler map of N. California. Perhaps I should just get a Butler map of Central and/or S. California also.

    Charlie

  10. #10
    Well you are correct 98lee on knowing what Sequoia trees Charles is looking for? They are a ways apart. People throw that tree name (Sequoia) around for both types of trees and I get locked in on the type I live in around on the coast of California. Which would be more on the southern end of the Coastal Redwood range. For what it is worth, here is why some are confused.

    The botanical name: Sequoia Semperviren- Coastal Redwoods are indeed on the coast of mostly California. There are some in southern Oregon.
    The botanical name: Sequoiadendron giganteom- Giant Sequoia are the trees in the Sierra Mountains.

    For many people the terms get screwed up as to what they are referring to? It is easy to do when compared together.

    My Dad was a State Forester and literally grew millions of Redwoods and many other species of trees for reforestation. Both kinds of Redwoods hold their own beauty.......

    John

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the clarification John. I was referring to the Sequoia of the Sierras as I thought Redwoods were referred to Coastal Redwoods as their native range was limited to 30 +- miles within the Pacific Coast. Appearently an erroneous oversimplification for the uninformed.

    You posted as I was just headed to my most prized book "Native Trees of North America" to see if I knew what I was talking about or just been riding too long with my mouth open.
    Charlie
    Last edited by 72r60/7; 02-24-2017 at 04:20 AM. Reason: Spelling

  12. #12
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    Charlie,

    Like John explained, there are a couple species of trees that are technically "Sequoias".

    But the tallest ones along the coast are commonly called "Coastal Redwoods" and the slightly shorter but much larger diameter ones in parts of the south western Sierra Nevada range are commonly called "Giant Sequoia or just Sequoia".

    So which ones are you looking to ride through? You can do both if you want to ride that far south before heading back up to Utah. They are both amazing and definitely worth it!



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    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 72r60/7 View Post
    Thanks for the clarification John. I was referring to the Sequoia of the Sierras as I thought Redwoods were referred to Coastal Redwoods as their native range was limited to 30 +- miles within the Pacific Coast. Appearently an erroneous oversimplification for the uninformed.

    You posted as I was just headed to my most prized book "Native Trees of North America" to see if I knew what I was talking about or just been riding to long with my mouth open.
    Charlie
    Normally, I would suggest Mariposa Grove inside the southern gate of Yosemite, but it is closed until late 2017 for restoration work. The millions of visitors to the grove have been hard on the shallow roots of these giants, so they are doing work to the trails to minimize the impact.

    There are less than 80 groves (some with as few as a dozen mature trees) in California. For the best experience, head for Sequoia National Park (you do have your National Park Senior Pass, right?).



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
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  14. #14
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    Looking for just the (Giant) Sequoia of the Sierra Nevada this trip, Lee.
    Should have used the Latin names.

    Thanks to all for staying until I got back on track.

    Charlie

  15. #15
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    Mid May may be a problem if the winter storms keep up for a few more weeks like we've been having. The Sequoias are at higher elevations and the snow might not be melted by mid May this year. Check road conditions and access before your trip.

    https://www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvis...uoiagroves.htm

    If at all possible, see the General Sherman tree, the largest tree in the world.


    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
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