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Thread: Picking Up an Adventure Bike Alone

  1. #1
    Registered User boltgunner's Avatar
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    Picking Up an Adventure Bike Alone

    I came across a neat tool I thought I would share...

    https://www.advmotorrad.com/index.php?route=common/home

    Dustriders Motorcycle Hoist

  2. #2
    FUKENGRUVEN SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    Learning this is cheaper and quicker.

    http://www.pinkribbonrides.com/dropped.html
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  3. #3
    IBA# 5819 61996's Avatar
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    Thats the way I did it...

    20160814_161517.jpg
    “Fate whispers to the warrior, 'You can not withstand the storm.'
    The warrior whispers back, 'I am the storm.'

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    Learning this is cheaper and quicker.

    http://www.pinkribbonrides.com/dropped.html
    Is Skert still around? I haven't seen her in several years. She is a hoot and was inspirational for me when I was getting started. However, she jokingly told me one time that I was just too little to ride a motorcycle!
    Last edited by shortythorne; 09-07-2016 at 01:14 AM.
    Gail Thorne
    2017 F700GS

  5. #5
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortythorne View Post
    Is Skert still around? I haven't seen her in several years. She is a hoot and was inspirational for me when I was getting started. However, she jokingly told me one time that I was just too little to ride a motorcycle!
    Watched her silence a group of snarky men some years back...I had seen her demo before and they were doubtful a woman could pick up an RT....sure got quiet


    Oh, on the OP and the product, My luck it would be on the dirt side of the bike wedged against where I had it tied to a sidecase
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  6. #6
    Registered User boltgunner's Avatar
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    They state that you should pack it where you can get to it regardless of which side is down. As for me, I am up in years, and the three times I stood up my GS without help or a hoist, it was darn near a dead heat.

    Here is another bit of intel...
    https://www.advmotorrad.com/Media/Du...s%20Review.pdf

  7. #7
    IMO, he greatest problem with "adventure" bikes is the fact that they are overloaded. Not being heavy enough from the factory, some people empty the Touratech catalog on them and put on guards that guard the guards. Then they pack it like a mule with every item that they might even possibly need. The load is usually tall and aft. I've never seen Skert lift one of these capsized elephants.

    You are not properly packed when there is nothing else that you can add, but when there is nothing else that you can leave behind. Unload it. Upright it (remember, Skert can do it). Reload it. Be more careful next time.
    Lee A. Dickinson - Danielsville, GA USA
    MOA 80364 | RA 29650 | ABC 3480 | IBA 8914
    1992 R100RS - 1993 K1100RS - 2013 R1200GS

  8. #8
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerphile View Post
    IMO, he greatest problem with "adventure" bikes is the fact that they are overloaded. Not being heavy enough from the factory, some people empty the Touratech catalog on them and put on guards that guard the guards. Then they pack it like a mule with every item that they might even possibly need. The load is usually tall and aft. I've never seen Skert lift one of these capsized elephants.

    You are not properly packed when there is nothing else that you can add, but when there is nothing else that you can leave behind. Unload it. Upright it (remember, Skert can do it). Reload it. Be more careful next time.
    I pack quite a bit on my GS; camping gear, fishing gear, cooking gear and food for several days, water, tools, safety and survival gear, etc. I don't carry anything I don't need or anything that may not be needed to manage self sufficiently alone in remote areas and what I do carry has been carefully selected for minimalism where practical. The first thing to do when the bikes goes horizontal is shut it off then do nothing. Take a pause, relax a bit, think about it, have a bit of water, maybe a snack. Now unload everything that can be taken off the bike. Usually the only thing left on is the tank bag (mine is a minimalist size) and the pannier that is on the low side (since the bike is probably resting on it). Now take another break and then get at lifting the bike by whatever means suits you and the situation. Put it all back together, ride, repeat.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  9. #9
    A good friend of mine let her big ole BMW tip over onto the right side while in the garage . She lives alone, so there was no one around to help, and us girls like to be independent so she wrestled around with the bike for what seemed like an eternity (not much space, so forget all the correct lifting procedures). She was absolutely exhausted, so she quit, went in the house for a break and tried again and was able to get the bike upright....however, she had forgotten to put the side stand down and over it went again .
    Gail Thorne
    2017 F700GS

  10. #10
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    I kinda hate it when the Damned thing takes a nap. It seems they all do it
    If you can-
    Realize its down.....and it's no big deal (for the most part).
    Put the bike in a gear and, lock the front brake if you can.
    Deploy the side-stand ifnin' it's the side that's it's being lifted to.
    Get yourself in a comfortable position for your lift, this may require the addition of the small handlebar "web" straps in odd places so your arms and legs work best.
    Give it a lift using the procedures outlined in many of the videos on line.



    Hate to mention, like the center stand- the more practice the easier it gets.

    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
    Mod Squad
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  11. #11
    Registered User boltgunner's Avatar
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    Sometimes I think a rugged little trailer makes better sense when it comes to lugging all the stuff...OK, you can pile on me now.

  12. #12
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boltgunner View Post
    Sometimes I think a rugged little trailer makes better sense when it comes to lugging all the stuff...OK, you can pile on me now.
    Not a pile on, but an observation...if you are not two up and need a trailer to haul your adventure bike goodies...you have way too much stuff
    Could not imagine going off the pavement with stuff dragging behind me...but for those that do it...well, OK.

    images-5.jpeg

    too much?
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  13. #13
    Registered User boltgunner's Avatar
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    That's just nuts! Buy a convertible!

  14. #14
    bmw2003gs jeffryasmith's Avatar
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    Cool Thanks for the reference

    I remember reading this in MOA but couldn't find it. Thanks for the reference. I am usually out there alone, and picking up my fully loaded F650GS can be troublesome depending on the situation. One time I had to wait until some folks came by to help because I was just too exhausted to pick it up one more time that day.
    bmw2003gs in Harrisburg

  15. #15
    Registered User crucian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcmxcivrs View Post
    I pack quite a bit on my GS; camping gear, fishing gear, cooking gear and food for several days, water, tools, safety and survival gear, etc. I don't carry anything I don't need or anything that may not be needed to manage self sufficiently alone in remote areas and what I do carry has been carefully selected for minimalism where practical. The first thing to do when the bikes goes horizontal is shut it off then do nothing.
    In a jam, a pregnant pause gives birth inspired solutions. Take what you believe in and depending on how it works out, believe in something better next time. This comment comes from a guy whose GSA is named Bessie and my steering commands consist of Gee and Haw.

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